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  • #16
    Gorbag and Canuck 416
    How many weeks does your intensity period last? How many weeks for your low intensity?
    I am also curious about matching the diet macros.

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    • #17
      Originally posted by Vick View Post
      You really can't say the Jones was wrong. His system wasn't perfect, but as this article points out, he made great strides in educating the fitness community. Mentzer was one of the first to discover when you stalled take time off and you will come back even stronger.
      Both Mentzer and Jones were biased extremists in their opinions and they have very few followers, if any, among professional athletes. Their view that you must progress from workout to workout works to a certain degree for newbies or when regaining lost strength, as Jones "proved" on Casey Viator in his infamous Colorado experiment - and it may also work when coming from high volume training when reducing fatigue will give a boost for super-compensation! But the premises behind their theories are still wrong. Other Hit system such as used by Yates or Doggcrapp makes much more sense though IMO… But Jones and Mentzer were right about one important thing; intensity matters, and that going to failure or close to failure is very important from time to time.

      Originally posted by Vick View Post
      I would argue that the principle of periodization has been around since the eighties as "common knowledge". It was starting with the likes of Charlie Francis but many coaches still just beat the crap out of their athletes in the name of building endurance.
      Common knowledge among serious athletes at least, and personally I started to learn about periodization already in 1978 at the age of 15! And when going to “sports school” in 1980 athletes from all kind of sports used both long term and short term periodization. The most common system for a year was to ramp up volume off season, and train yourself down into the cellar so to say – and then after some months little by little reducing volume, and train much more intense before the important competitions. So volume goes down intensity comes up and high intensity contest specific training of short duration replaces high volume…
      "All truth passes through three stages. First, it is ridiculed. Second, it is violently opposed. Third, it is accepted as being self-evident."

      - Schopenhauer

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      • #18
        Originally posted by Vick View Post
        Gorbag and Canuck 416
        How many weeks does your intensity period last? How many weeks for your low intensity?
        I am also curious about matching the diet macros.
        It depends, but I have recently stayed for 7 weeks on very high volume, 5-6 days a week weight training, and right now I am doing 4 days a week for four weeks doing a split for monday, tuesday and fullbody on thursday and saturday, and I plan to reduce to three days a week doing high intensity training similar to Doggcrapp...
        "All truth passes through three stages. First, it is ridiculed. Second, it is violently opposed. Third, it is accepted as being self-evident."

        - Schopenhauer

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        • #19
          I've always done heavy strength training for 4 months, then wrestled for 8 months of the year. This had its own inherent periodization cause your not gonna hit the mat for a couple hours a day 6x/week, plus cut weight, plus expect to make gains in the weights. So this is an 8 month cut 4 month bulk and strengthen cycle I repeated for 15+ years. But now that there is no 8 month cut, and there is no deadline to get as strong as can be before season starts I can appreciate the long view. Both HIT and periodization make sense. HIT proponents would say that periodization is simply working out efficiently for a time then working out inefficiently while you recover. So HIT would claim to just build in the proper amount of rest and recovery rather than work out inefficiently. From a tissue repair and remodeling stand point this makes sense for both groups. High intensity creates the damage and inherent inflammatory response required for growth and low intensity moves blood through the muscles aiding in the healing process. However, I think you can get that low intensity flow going with an active lifestyle just as well (see my stuff earlier). So in the end I could make a case for either AND since muscle/lean mass growth is such a slow process it would be really hard to prove one or the other given individual genetic variance. HIT works for my lifestyle better.... but if I ever get bored I'll switch it up.

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          • #20
            Over the years when I am focusing on training I generally set up my schedule so that periodization takes place in 4 week cycles which last for 3 months. The first three weeks of each 4 week cycle see a weekly build up of intensity and the final 4th week is of very low intensity. Each succeeding week begins at a greater level of intensity than the week before so the third week is the hardest (The beginning of the second week in the cycle is harder than the beginning of the first week in the cycle and so on). I like to completely change up the program every 3 months. I just finished up 3 months of an Old School 70's style bodybuilding routine. There's a list of the exercises, days trained and body parts trained listed in this blog I recently did for Peak Performance -

            http://www.peakperformanceradio.net/...n-saville.html
            Last edited by canuck416; 08-09-2013, 01:56 PM.
            Recent Blog: http://www.peakperformanceradio.net/...y-john-saville

            https://www.facebook.com/PaleoJourne...?ref=bookmarks

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            • #21
              Forgot to talk about the diet macros. Typically I like lots of variety but do it in a structured way. So each week in which I increase intensity I also increase my daily carb grams and slowly decrease my fat, protein stays about the same (pretty much stay on Primal version of Paleo). During the rest week I go strictly old school Paleo, pretty low on the daily carbs (keep below 75 gms) and keep my fat and protein high.
              Last edited by canuck416; 08-09-2013, 02:35 PM.
              Recent Blog: http://www.peakperformanceradio.net/...y-john-saville

              https://www.facebook.com/PaleoJourne...?ref=bookmarks

              Comment


              • #22
                Question to all:
                What is your weekly routine and program? I'm not so much interested in your weight rather than are you going to failure or leaving a few reps on the table. are you going after volume or intensity?

                My exact routine right now is 3 times a week scheduled at least once I get there.

                I do my dynamic stretching walking in from the parking lot.
                TGU 1 rep each side.

                Drop the weight by 5 lbs and do 1 rep each side.

                Deadlift target 1 set of 3 reps, at 95% 1RM followed by 5 reps at 85% 1RM One set does not last long than 10 seconds to minimize lactic acid.

                3 sets of 2 reps torture twists.

                I try not to go to failure, but there are times I push that extra rep... particularly when I know I won't be back on schedule.

                Time Under Load per session: less than 4 minutes

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                • #23
                  I'm still pushing to failure... my program just before I took this past 10 days off was:

                  Workout A
                  Weighted dips to failure
                  drop set to bodyweight dips to failure (no rest between drop sets.... and move from one lift to the next with minimal rest)
                  Weighted chins
                  drop set to unweighted... again to failure for both
                  Leg press to failure
                  Shoulder press to failure

                  Usually shooting for 3-6 reps with a 5/5 sort of cadence.... Upper body stays in the 45-90 second TUL zone and lower is 90-120. For chins I'll usually do 4 reps weighted then 3 unweighted for instance.

                  72-96 hours Rest

                  Workout B

                  On this workout I actually take as much time as needed between sets rather than the no rest thing I do in workout A except when dropsets are involved.

                  Deadlifts 3 sets of 5-10 with increasing weights as my warmups to
                  1x3-5 essentially to failure
                  Dropset to 50lbs less and usually hit 10-12 reps near failure.
                  Overhead Press 3x3-8.... depending on where I'm at.... only the last set is to failure.

                  72-96 hours rest before workout A starts again.

                  I would get through each workout in 20 minutes or less sometimes. Did this routine these past 6 months or so and have made some nice gains, but my deadlift is really stalling out now and I'm feeling more run down for longer periods on my days off. Time to change some things.
                  Last edited by Neckhammer; 08-09-2013, 04:14 PM.

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                  • #24
                    For me its classic progressive resistance - For example in a 5 set 12 rep series I'll initially pick a weight in which I can get 3 sets of 12, 1 set of 10 and 1 set of 8, once I can do 5 sets of 12 I up the weight. Once every couple of weeks I'll pyramid up to 1 rep max on certain lifts - primarily Bench Press, Squats, Deadlifts in other exercises like dips or pull-ups I'll do maximum number of reps at body weight until failure.
                    Recent Blog: http://www.peakperformanceradio.net/...y-john-saville

                    https://www.facebook.com/PaleoJourne...?ref=bookmarks

                    Comment


                    • #25
                      Originally posted by canuck416 View Post
                      For me its classic progressive resistance - For example in a 5 set 12 rep series I'll initially pick a weight in which I can get 3 sets of 12, 1 set of 10 and 1 set of 8, once I can do 5 sets of 12 I up the weight. Once every couple of weeks I'll pyramid up to 1 rep max on certain lifts - primarily Bench Press, Squats, Deadlifts in other exercises like dips or pull-ups I'll do maximum number of reps at body weight until failure.
                      Up until the past month, I did 1 set 5-10 reps to fatigue and went up progressively to fail on my last rep. You work with less weight relatively speaking so that you can get in 5 sets of 12 reps.

                      I chose 1 set, because there is no evidence, showing the multiple sets improve strength. Why do you like 5 sets?

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                      • #26
                        Originally posted by Vick View Post
                        Up until the past month, I did 1 set 5-10 reps to fatigue and went up progressively to fail on my last rep. You work with less weight relatively speaking so that you can get in 5 sets of 12 reps.

                        I chose 1 set, because there is no evidence, showing the multiple sets improve strength. Why do you like 5 sets?
                        Its a body building thing. For me personally I would not get the type of pump, muscle gains or physique shape I am looking for with just one set. Training for basic strength and body building are two different ways of training, depends what your goals are.
                        Recent Blog: http://www.peakperformanceradio.net/...y-john-saville

                        https://www.facebook.com/PaleoJourne...?ref=bookmarks

                        Comment


                        • #27
                          Originally posted by canuck416 View Post
                          Its a body building thing. For me personally I would not get the type of pump, muscle gains or physique shape I am looking for with just one set. Training for basic strength and body building are two different ways of training, depends what your goals are.
                          Thanks. That answer helps many people determine their program based on their goals. For me strength is the number one goal. Strength that allows me to lead an active life. Everything I read leads to upping the intensity and lowering the TUL for strength. This appears to be very important in weight limit sports such as boxing, etc. More reps appears to add to hypertrophy which is not always a good thing at weigh in time.

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                          • #28
                            Originally posted by Vick View Post
                            Thanks. That answer helps many people determine their program based on their goals. For me strength is the number one goal. Strength that allows me to lead an active life. Everything I read leads to upping the intensity and lowering the TUL for strength. This appears to be very important in weight limit sports such as boxing, etc. More reps appears to add to hypertrophy which is not always a good thing at weigh in time.
                            Speaking of weight limit sports you might find this interesting. I use to wrestle in high school and at university, we did strength training similar to your current approach but also added muscle endurance training and circuit weight training once or twice a week. We would build up to ridiculous amounts of reps like 50 reps on the bench at 135 lbs. or 100 squats at 135 lbs. - light weights very high reps.
                            Last edited by canuck416; 08-10-2013, 08:32 AM.
                            Recent Blog: http://www.peakperformanceradio.net/...y-john-saville

                            https://www.facebook.com/PaleoJourne...?ref=bookmarks

                            Comment


                            • #29
                              Oh you were a wrestler too hey canuck? I knew there was a reason I liked you...

                              Comment


                              • #30
                                Originally posted by Neckhammer View Post
                                Oh you were a wrestler too hey canuck? I knew there was a reason I liked you...
                                Yeah, wrestled 148 how about you?

                                It's a great sport, set the foundation for many of my athletic adventures from running to weight training. I remember we used to go for 3 to 6 mile runs several times a week and people use to throw beer bottles at us and call us fags (yeah people used to drink and drive back in the late 60's). We used to have these fund raisers called walk-a-thons to raise money for cancer etc. One was a walk of about 27 miles , the wrestling team said hell we'll just run it! Ha Ha ... when I got home and in the bath tub I totally seized up and my dad had to come in and help me out of the tub!
                                Last edited by canuck416; 08-10-2013, 08:19 PM.
                                Recent Blog: http://www.peakperformanceradio.net/...y-john-saville

                                https://www.facebook.com/PaleoJourne...?ref=bookmarks

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