Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Can you get strong without deadlift?

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Can you get strong without deadlift?

    I hurt my back AGAIN doing deadlift. Is it possible to get strong without it? Or should I just switch to a body-building kind of thing and just go for a nice-looking body and forget about being strong?
    Female, 5'3", 50, Max squat: 202.5lbs. Max deadlift: 225 x 3.

  • #2
    Can you get strong? Yes. Can you get AS strong? Probably not.

    Comment


    • #3
      Being "strong" is always relative, there is nothing magical by deadlift! Deadlifts build muscle all over your body, but you can get the same strenght from other exercises! The only "must" about deadlift is if you want to impress others or yourself with it. Rack pulls from the pins right below the knee cap can be an alternative to regular deadlifts and save the lower back a lot. Monday I pulled 505 for 3 X 4, and my lower back feel OK. If I want to beat up my lower back more, I could just do a few sets of heavy good mornings in addition to the rack pulls...
      "All truth passes through three stages. First, it is ridiculed. Second, it is violently opposed. Third, it is accepted as being self-evident."

      - Schopenhauer

      Comment


      • #4
        I have a friend who hasn't been able to deadlift since January because of a slipped disk. Since then she's added 20+ pounds to her squat, clean, and jerk, and 10 pounds to her strict press. Oh, and she can do strict pull-ups now, too. Not being able to deadlift isn't the end of the world.

        Also, you could try trap bar deadlift, since this uses way more legs than back and will develop strength in largely the same way.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by Mr. Anthony View Post
          Can you get strong? Yes. Can you get AS strong? Probably not.
          Sonofabitch! Stop saying stuff that I'm going to say.

          Comment


          • #6
            I pretty much agree with everyone so far. They are not required, but they are a great exercise. If you keep hurting yourself, there is likely an issue with mobility causing a breakdown in form. Or it could just be bad form. Some people have poor anthropometry for certain lifts. If you have short arms and a long torso/legs, you will have a harder time with conventional deads. You can drop them altogether or try a modification, like trap bar as heatseeker suggested, or rack pulls as Gorbag suggested. You could also try sumo style. These substitutes are great for keeping the muscles involved strong while you sort out your issue with the conventional deadlift (not that you absolutely have to do conventional deads). Here is a good article series from Eric Cressey:

            How to Deadlift: Which Variation is Right for You? - Part 1 | Eric Cressey | High Performance Training, Personal Training
            How to Deadlift: Which Variation is Right for You? - Part 2 (Sumo Deadlift) | Eric Cressey | High Performance Training, Personal Training

            I highly recommend "Becoming A Supple Leopard" for teaching yourself proper form and figuring out and fixing mobility issues. (Becoming a Supple Leopard: The Ultimate Guide to Resolving Pain, Preventing Injury, and Optimizing Athletic Performance: Kelly Starrett, Glen Cordoza: 9781936608584: Amazon.com: Books)

            Comment


            • #7
              Nope. Hang it up. Go back to knitting.

              Heheh. Hope ya know me better than that

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by Neckhammer View Post
                Nope. Hang it up. Go back to knitting.
                Hey now, don't be putting down knitting! Knitters can be strong!
                Life is death. We all take turns. It's sacred to eat during our turn and be eaten when our turn is over. RichMahogany.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by yodiewan View Post
                  I pretty much agree with everyone so far. They are not required, but they are a great exercise. If you keep hurting yourself, there is likely an issue with mobility causing a breakdown in form. Or it could just be bad form. Some people have poor anthropometry for certain lifts. If you have short arms and a long torso/legs, you will have a harder time with conventional deads. You can drop them altogether or try a modification, like trap bar as heatseeker suggested, or rack pulls as Gorbag suggested. You could also try sumo style. These substitutes are great for keeping the muscles involved strong while you sort out your issue with the conventional deadlift (not that you absolutely have to do conventional deads). Here is a good article series from Eric Cressey:

                  How to Deadlift: Which Variation is Right for You? - Part 1 | Eric Cressey | High Performance Training, Personal Training
                  How to Deadlift: Which Variation is Right for You? - Part 2 (Sumo Deadlift) | Eric Cressey | High Performance Training, Personal Training

                  I highly recommend "Becoming A Supple Leopard" for teaching yourself proper form and figuring out and fixing mobility issues. (Becoming a Supple Leopard: The Ultimate Guide to Resolving Pain, Preventing Injury, and Optimizing Athletic Performance: Kelly Starrett, Glen Cordoza: 9781936608584: Amazon.com: Books)
                  +1. And according to Supple Leopard, it migh be form, or how you are setting up and stabilizing by adding torsion to your body. Seems like a great opportunity to explore why the injuries happen, how you can create the ancillary strength and stability needed to DL, etc. Picking up heavy stuff is a good skill to have.

                  Btw, sbhike, you are one of my forum heroes due to your continuous exploration, sensible, well- researched approaches, and willingness to just buckle down and do the hard work. Must Have come from all of that hiking; you can't get from point A to B without a lot of putting one foot in front of the next.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Thank you. I thought I had the form all dialed in. I've got layers of shin bruises to show for it. But somehow it is too easy to slip in the middle of the lift or something. I mean there I am, starting rep 3 when all of a sudden everything just shifted in my whole body, there were three rapid very loud cracking noises in the lower part of my spine, almost like the whole thing was being stretched apart. It was very scary, felt both like relief of some pressure I didn't know I had plus a sickening feeling. It's just too easy to mess up and now I'm afraid.

                    I have long forearms, not short. I suppose I should do the trap bar deadlifts. How much does the trap bar weigh?
                    Female, 5'3", 50, Max squat: 202.5lbs. Max deadlift: 225 x 3.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      You get stronger through progressive resistance increases and by injecting variety into your routines which helps to stimulate your muscles in new and different ways . This is a great time for you to switch up your training and do something new. I encourage you to never do the same routine for more than 6 weeks before changing it.
                      Recent Blog: http://www.peakperformanceradio.net/...y-john-saville

                      https://www.facebook.com/PaleoJourne...?ref=bookmarks

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by canuck416 View Post
                        You get stronger through progressive resistance increases and by injecting variety into your routines which helps to stimulate your muscles in new and different ways . This is a great time for you to switch up your training and do something new. I encourage you to never do the same routine for more than 6 weeks before changing it.
                        Are you saying variety is required to keep gaining strength? Are you also encouraging someone to switch their routine, even if it is working for them, after a 6 week period?

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          The deadlift is probably the best barbell exercise, after the squat, for developing strength and overall health. A strong deadlift helps to increase your grip strength, keep your back surgery free, and improve your posture. It is a very useful lift. I would recommend that you deload, work on form, and continue to deadlift.

                          But...if you really don't want to do it, it's not essential for everybody. Weightlifters hardly ever deadlift, but they are still very strong. If you decide to quit deadlifting, incorporate snatches and clean and jerks into your routine.
                          In matters of style, swim with the current. In matters of principle, stand like a rock.

                          This message has been intercepted by the NSA, the only branch of government that listens.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by sbhikes View Post
                            Thank you. I thought I had the form all dialed in. I've got layers of shin bruises to show for it. But somehow it is too easy to slip in the middle of the lift or something. I mean there I am, starting rep 3 when all of a sudden everything just shifted in my whole body, there were three rapid very loud cracking noises in the lower part of my spine, almost like the whole thing was being stretched apart. It was very scary, felt both like relief of some pressure I didn't know I had plus a sickening feeling. It's just too easy to mess up and now I'm afraid.

                            I have long forearms, not short. I suppose I should do the trap bar deadlifts. How much does the trap bar weigh?
                            Wow. That sounds pretty bad. I'd ditch it. Seriously, sometimes you just gotta ask yourself if its worth it. For whatever reason your body isn't ready to handle this movement with any great degree of load. Do other things. Its fine. Work on getting stronger, then come back and give it a try in a year if you really want to.

                            Hey I don't squat. Call me a sissy boy. I don't give a shit. Strength is the ability to produce force. All things being equal bigger muscles produce more force. Work your muscles and get stronger WITHOUT hurting yourself. How strong you gonna be if you gotta get back surgery cause YOU GOTTA DEAD LIFT BRAH!

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              I love dead lifts and fear them too!! Back injuries can be lifelong...........get well soon!!

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X