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The No-Nonsense Way to Build Strength

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  • The No-Nonsense Way to Build Strength

    If you enjoy complex, time-consuming muscle building routines, this piece is not for you.

    Here are the main points. I'll put a link to the full article at the bottom.

    Based on his own research and that of many others, Dr. Carpinelli lists seven straightforward guidelines which have been shown to work. These recommendations make sense for just about everyone, civilian or military. The simple, research based, no-nonsense guidelines provided by Carpinelli follow: (Parenthetical comments are clarifications.)

    1) Select one or two free weight or machine exercises for each muscle group. (Exercises may be changed from time to time.)

    2) Lifting duration should be consistent with good form throughout each repetition. (Not too slow or too fast)

    3) Range of repetitions can be from 3 to 20, which may vary from exercise to exercise or workout to workout.

    4) Continue each set until it becomes difficult to maintain good form. (The level of effort required for optimal strength gains is unknown.)

    5) Do one set of each exercise. (There is very little evidence to suggest that multiple sets of each exercise are superior to a single set for strength gains.)

    6) Rest long enough between exercises to allow proper form for each exercise. (Donít rush or rest longer than necessary.)

    7) Train each muscle group 1 to 3 times a week, depending on individual recuperation and response.

    * * *
    The Simple, No-Nonsense Way to Build Strength
    Last edited by Vick; 07-08-2013, 02:52 PM.

  • #2
    Machines are boring, and you have to join a gym.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by Vick View Post
      Based on his own research and that of many others, Dr. Carpinelli lists seven straightforward guidelines which have been shown to work. These recommendations make sense for just about everyone, civilian or military. The simple, research based, no-nonsense guidelines provided by Carpinelli follow...
      How was this "research" done?

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      • #4
        Originally posted by quikky View Post
        How was this "research" done?
        You probably could find out by looking here:

        "Dr. Ralph N. Carpinelli, Human Performance Laboratory, Adelphi University, Garden City, NY, has done a critical analysis of a review of strength training in the military. His findings and conclusions are reported in the April, 2013, Journal of Exercise Physiology."

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Neckhammer View Post
          Probably could find out by looking here:

          "Dr. Ralph N. Carpinelli, Human Performance Laboratory, Adelphi University, Garden City, NY, has done a critical analysis of a review of strength training in the military. His findings and conclusions are reported in the April, 2013, Journal of Exercise Physiology."
          I think the burden of explaining the research is with the person presenting its conclusions.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by quikky View Post
            I think the burden of explaining the research is with the person presenting its conclusions.
            huh???

            I think your confusing things. These are recommendations laid out by the researcher himself, so the only way to see how the research was done would be to review it yourself. From the horses mouth so to speak.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Neckhammer View Post
              huh???

              I think your confusing things. These are recommendations laid out by the researcher himself, so the only way to see how the research was done would be to review it yourself. From the horses mouth so to speak.
              Vick, the OP, posted these recommendations for us based on the research. Since he has done that, I presume he is familiar with the research behind these suggestions and can summarize what the research entailed without me reading through the studies.

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              • #8
                Oh, I see. You want Vick to explain it to you.

                I thought perhaps you didn't realize that his entire thing was quoted directly from the researcher.

                Thats fine, but this really does not seem all that daunting of a read if your interested in figuring things out for yourself http://www.asep.org/asep/asep/JEPonl...Carpinelli.pdf
                Last edited by Neckhammer; 07-08-2013, 04:18 PM.

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                • #9
                  [QUOTE=Neckhammer;1246486]Oh, I see. You want Vick to explain it to you.
                  QUOTE]

                  That's ok Neckhammer, I was tempted to post that different exercises were attached to a crown and anchor wheel and he gave it a spin.

                  Besides his own research, he has reviewed the research of others than compared results. The man doesn't sell a program... he has spent his career in the rsearch field.

                  Probably the only point he doesn't cover is make sure you do what you enjoy... otherwise it will have no sticking power.

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                  • #10
                    Can I pick as my "muscle group" the entire body?
                    Female, 5'3", 50, Max squat: 202.5lbs. Max deadlift: 225 x 3.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by sbhikes View Post
                      Can I pick as my "muscle group" the entire body?
                      Only if your doing a clean and press

                      Really I'm trying to think of any other single exercise that does hit everything??? Anyone got another one? Deadlift leaves out the tris and shoulders and chest. Chins and dips leave out the legs. Squats are good, but not gonna count that for chest shoulder or arms. Is the clean and press the only one?
                      Last edited by Neckhammer; 07-08-2013, 05:43 PM.

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                      • #12
                        Just because I'm "that guy," here's a paper that I think makes clear the problematic state of exercise physiology "science"

                        Starting Strength

                        I'm sure Gorbag will have some rude comments and try to discredit Dr. Sullivan for his affiliation with one Mark Rippetoe, but it's worth a read and I highly recommend it. Besides being well-written and damn exhaustive, it's actually quite funny.
                        Last edited by RichMahogany; 07-08-2013, 05:52 PM.
                        The Champagne of Beards

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                        • #13
                          Here is a sample of a study Carp did back in 2004

                          http://www.asep.org/files/OttoV4.pdf

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Neckhammer View Post
                            Only if your doing a clean and press

                            Really I'm trying to think of any other single exercise that does hit everything??? Anyone got another one? Deadlift leaves out the tris and shoulders and chest. Chins and dips leave out the legs. Squats are good, but not gonna count that for chest shoulder or arms. Is the clean and press the only one?
                            If I was allowed only one resistance exercise it would be the Turkish Get up. I think that one covers it all.

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by RichMahogany View Post
                              Just because I'm "that guy," here's a paper that I think makes clear the problematic state of exercise physiology "science"

                              Starting Strength

                              I'm sure Gorbag will have some rude comments and try to discredit Dr. Sullivan for his affiliation with one Mark Rippetoe, but it's worth a read and I highly recommend it. Besides being well-written and damn exhaustive, it's actually quite funny.
                              Cool, this is gonna take a bit of time, but it does indeed look worth checking out.

                              Comment

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