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Cardio vs Strength - Burning Fat

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  • #16
    Originally posted by Allenete View Post
    Could you clarify what you mean here?

    By "sends the calories" do you mean "draws the calories(energy)" from these sources?
    You are correct. But the sneaky part is for you to draw the calories from there, the body has to send them there and store them so that you can draw them from there. Conventional wisdom has taught us we want to burn fat, when in fact we want to burn "carbs" which are stored in our muscle tissues. Therefore we tell the body to store energy in our muscles.

    High intensity exercise tells the body to increase muscle mass to increase storage to prevent fatigue. Cardio tells the body to reduce muscle mass to prevent fatigue.

    We should eat a high ratio of fat and protein and exercise to burn carbs. Conventional wisdom teaches us to eat carbs and burn fat. Just look at the obesity rates and judge for yourself which way is the right way to go.
    Last edited by Vick; 07-02-2013, 05:54 PM.

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    • #17
      Originally posted by Vick View Post
      You are correct. But the sneaky part is for you to draw the calories from there, the body has to send them there and store them so that you can draw them from there. Conventional wisdom has taught us we want to burn fat, when in fact we want to burn "carbs" which are stored in our muscle tissues. Therefore we tell the body to store energy in our muscles.

      High intensity exercise tells the body to increase muscle mass to increase storage to prevent fatigue. Cardio tells the body to reduce muscle mass to prevent fatigue.

      We should eat a high ratio of fat and protein and exercise to burn carbs. Conventional wisdom teaches us to eat carbs and burn fat. Just look at the obesity rates and judge for yourself which way is the right way to go.
      I gotta say....most of the time when people on here breakdown this kind of thing it is pure rubbish....but that was very well done and succinctly put.

      I am a gearhead, so I put it in terms like this: Pretend you are a car and you have 5 speeds. 1st gear is flat ground walking, and burns fat over many hours. 2nd gear is hiking and builds muscle and burns fat faster. Gears 3 and 4 make you skinny/fat and sore. They will make you a diesel truck without the size....but gear 5....that makes you a Ferrari. You have slow, uphill and slow, and full bore with afterburners on. Everything in between isn't good unless intervals.
      "The soul that does not attempt flight; does not notice its chains."

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      • #18
        Originally posted by Allenete View Post
        I just sat in on a Q&S session at my gym, and one of the things mentioned was that while cardio burns fat, it mostly burns the fat that is under your skin, while weight training burns the fat deeper inside. This is the first I've heard if this!

        Any can back that up?
        How/why?
        ...Umm isn't all fat under the skin?

        I know I know Subcutaneous vs. Visceral fat storage. I just had to say it because no one else had yet. Do certain types of exercise burn different types of body fat? Simply as movement for calorie expendature no, but as causation to hormonal adjustments.... Possibly...

        The person you heard was probabably speaking in the simple terms of moving weight or increasing heart rate to burn calories and in this basic equation no. He/she doesn't know what they're talking about. The only way to really adjust the Sub/Vis fat storage is through diet, but lets dig into that a little further.

        Hormones regulate everthing in your body from breathing to hunger to heart rate to muscle growth and fat storage. To dig even further than that, studies have shown that lifting heavy weight increase testosterone levels directly after the exercise programs while steady state cardio increases cortisol levels directly after exercise.

        Testosterone helps manage fat stores on the body by breaking it down and removing it. Cortisol is a stress hormone that causes increased fat storage, specifically in the abdominal area (Insulin in the lower back, estrogen in the chest and hips). Cortisol is a very important hormone because it helps us wake up in the morning, supports our adrenal glands (more hormones), supports the fight or flight system. Basically it helps us to function normally. It's when we have an excess of it that it causes a problem and yes steady state cardio does cause an excess amount to be produced. Testosterone is the same way. It's great when you have just the right amount, but too much causes cancers, liver/kidney damage, blood clots lots of nasties.

        Sorry tangent. To get back to my point. This is way to simple an explaination but when you are lifting weights you are increasing testosterone which will lower body fat. When you are doing cardio, you are increasing cortisol which will increase body fat, but both of these are again more specific to subcutaneous fat... Initially...

        lol more or less confused?

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        • #19
          Originally posted by Vick View Post
          You are correct. But the sneaky part is for you to draw the calories from there, the body has to send them there and store them so that you can draw them from there. Conventional wisdom has taught us we want to burn fat, when in fact we want to burn "carbs" which are stored in our muscle tissues. Therefore we tell the body to store energy in our muscles.

          High intensity exercise tells the body to increase muscle mass to increase storage to prevent fatigue. Cardio tells the body to reduce muscle mass to prevent fatigue.

          We should eat a high ratio of fat and protein and exercise to burn carbs. Conventional wisdom teaches us to eat carbs and burn fat. Just look at the obesity rates and judge for yourself which way is the right way to go.
          Sorry to call you out but this isn't entirely true. Muscles don't store carbs. Carbs are "stored" in the body as fat. When Carbs are being used they are broken down into simple sugars then sent to the muscles for energy. If your goals is weight loss the key is to make sure your body is "storing" less carbs than expending. The idea that "carbs" are directed to the muscles being used is incorrect.

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          • #20
            Originally posted by Iron Will View Post
            Sorry to call you out but this isn't entirely true. Muscles don't store carbs. Carbs are "stored" in the body as fat. When Carbs are being used they are broken down into simple sugars then sent to the muscles for energy. If your goals is weight loss the key is to make sure your body is "storing" less carbs than expending. The idea that "carbs" are directed to the muscles being used is incorrect.
            Well, no, Vick is actually correct. Carbohydrates are stored in muscle cells, they are stored as glycogen. Glycogen is a polysaccharide (a complex carb) that muscles chop up into glucose when quick fuel is needed (like during intense activity). This process is called glycolysis, which is why intense activity is often referred to as glycolytic.

            Carbs are also stored in the liver in this same way.

            It's generally only when the liver and muscles are full of glycogen, and thus unable to store any more, that carbs are converted into fat and then stored as such.

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            • #21
              Originally posted by ciep View Post
              Well, no, Vick is actually correct. Carbohydrates are stored in muscle cells, they are stored as glycogen. Glycogen is a polysaccharide (a complex carb) that muscles chop up into glucose when quick fuel is needed (like during intense activity). This process is called glycolysis, which is why intense activity is often referred to as glycolytic.

              Carbs are also stored in the liver in this same way.

              It's generally only when the liver and muscles are full of glycogen, and thus unable to store any more, that carbs are converted into fat and then stored as such.
              You and I are essentially saying the same thing. Thanks for explaining it more and in more depth.

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              • #22
                Originally posted by ciep View Post
                It's generally only when the liver and muscles are full of glycogen, and thus unable to store any more, that carbs are converted into fat and then stored as such.
                That is very true to a point. However if you exercise at a moderate heart rate, (jogging) then you train the body to draw energy from fat because that is the most efficient for the body. The body adapts by reducing the size of the liver, and reducing muscle mass, so that there is less storage capacity and more storage in fat. So long as the "jogger" maintains a calorie deficit they remain slim... but once they give up jogging then the body doesn't adapt because resting is the same calorie draw. Hence the former jogger turns into an obesity statistic.

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                • #23
                  At the end of the day, it doesn't really matter what you do because body recomposition is based on total daily caloric intake. meaning that you can burn fat doing any exercise but if you are in a caloric surplus, you will gain fat/weight. Check out some of the quick weight loss tips I've written.
                  I am not a bodybuilding/fat loss/strength training "guru" BUT I achieved a lean state with ease after learning the correct way to train and eat and I want to HELP YOU achieve the same.

                  Getting fit is also about managing your mindset:
                  http://getfitmindset.com

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