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  • #61
    Wow, up to around $150 a month? Living in Santa Barbara I can only imagine what it is per month here. They do not post that information on their websites. If you have to ask, you can't afford it is what that means to me.

    I don't think we have a blackiron gym in Santa Barbara. I thought we had one next to the Alano Club but have not been able to find it or any other, except for one that has no staff, just keys they give out. I thought it was too expensive compared to the University for basically the same equipment.

    There's a topic on the Starting Strength forum right now about how some guy said strength training has improved his ability to play the trumpet, specifically hit the high notes without practice. That's both embouchure and breath control.
    Female, 5'3", 50, Max squat: 202.5lbs. Max deadlift: 225 x 3.

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    • #62
      Originally posted by Misabi View Post
      Sure, anyone can access the daily WODs and how to videos, for free directly from the crossfit.com site, or go here for scaled versions of the wod to suit your ability: CrossFit Brand X | Ramona, California | Powered by CrossFit
      Thank you, Misabi. Thios might be a way of giving it a try before committing.

      Originally posted by Goldie View Post
      Crossfit isn't for everyone. Just as paleo/primal has haters, so does Crossfit.

      I do it because it's fun, and makes me better at the other sports I do... ski, snowboard, hike, mountain bike, swim, Lift Heavy Things (like rocks) in my yard. I don't ever intend to compete in anything more than the Crossfit Open, and my workouts help me maintain a fitness level that's much higher than 99% of the rest of the US population. I don't have the genetic gift nor the motivation to be an elite athlete, I just want to be able to do the things I enjoy.
      This is me too. I really have no interest in "pumping iron" for its own sake at this point in my life. BTDT in my 20s. I am just interested in general fitness.

      I do however have reservations about what Zoe said about injuries. I know myself well enough to know that I am competitive and, in the heat of the moment I could very well push to get that last rep done and get hurt.

      The whole idea of timed workouts is not making much sense to me.

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      • #63
        Originally posted by Paleobird View Post
        Thank you, Misabi. Thios might be a way of giving it a try before committing.

        This is me too. I really have no interest in "pumping iron" for its own sake at this point in my life. BTDT in my 20s. I am just interested in general fitness.

        I do however have reservations about what Zoe said about injuries. I know myself well enough to know that I am competitive and, in the heat of the moment I could very well push to get that last rep done and get hurt.

        The whole idea of timed workouts is not making much sense to me.
        I would caution against doing the main site workouts, even scaled, on your own until you know that you are proficient in the movements.

        The idea of timed workouts has it's pros and cons. Fundamentally, it's meant to increase the intensity of the workout. If I do a certain number of reps in 5 minutes compared to doing the same number of reps in 10 minutes, I'm working harder if I do it in 5 minutes. It's also a way to measure progress. We periodically redo workouts as one way to measure progress. Sometimes you do the same workout, but you're able to do it faster. Sometimes you do the same workout, but you're able to do more reps.

        On the negative side, there is the possibility to push too hard and go too fast. Thus, my earlier comment of how people get retarded when I start the clock. I have some athletes that I have watch very closely. You just have to be smart about it. If you know you're competitive, tell your trainer.

        I, too, do CrossFit just for better overall fitness. It has truly been very empowering for me. I had never even touched a barbell before I started CrossFit. Now, I wish I had found it earlier and I'm hoping to come back as an Olympic weightlifter in my next life. ;-) I completed my first (and only) triathlon a couple of years ago. I hated it, but I would never have even entertained the notion before I started CrossFit.

        I'm not saying CrossFit is the only way I would have been able to accomplish these things. However, it is what worked and continues to work for me. Continue to do your research and keep asking questions.

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        • #64
          Originally posted by MathFit View Post
          I would caution against doing the main site workouts, even scaled, on your own until you know that you are proficient in the movements.
          Agreed, I spent a few weeks doing the bodyweight/very light weight equivalents of lifts that I wasn't already used to, as well as working on my form for lifts that were new to me. I personally find it fairly easy to learn by watching, so YouTube was a useful resource, but I also one of the weight lifting trainers at my gym was interested in what I was doing and was happy to help out with the my lifting form for free. He also ended up getting into crossfit too.



          Originally posted by MathFit View Post
          The idea of timed workouts has it's pros and cons. Fundamentally, it's meant to increase the intensity of the workout. If I do a certain number of reps in 5 minutes compared to doing the same number of reps in 10 minutes, I'm working harder if I do it in 5 minutes. It's also a way to measure progress. We periodically redo workouts as one way to measure progress. Sometimes you do the same workout, but you're able to do it faster. Sometimes you do the same workout, but you're able to do more reps.

          On the negative side, there is the possibility to push too hard and go too fast. Thus, my earlier comment of how people get retarded when I start the clock. I have some athletes that I have watch very closely. You just have to be smart about it. If you know you're competitive, tell your trainer.
          Absolutely. What I liked about doing it by myself was that, while I would still push myself to my limits sometimes, I never sacrificed form for better scores and was able to back off without the group pressure of trying to keep up or beat John Smith etc. I do get competitive so that would be a risk for me at a box. I guess it also comes down the culture at the individual box too and the quality of the trainers.
          If you're interested in my (very) occasional updates on how I'm working out and what I'm eating click here.

          Originally posted by tfarny
          If you are new to the PB - please ignore ALL of this stuff, until you've read the book, or at least http://www.marksdailyapple.com/primal-blueprint-101/

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          • #65
            Originally posted by Paleobird View Post
            Thank you, Misabi. Thios might be a way of giving it a try before committing.
            If you're happy not going to a gym and not so fussed about using weights, another alternative could be: http://skievat.blogspot.co.nz/search...7:00-08:00&m=1

            Though she seems to have stopped posting since I used to occasionally do one of her workouts when I couldn't get to the gym, Eva had left the old workouts up and free to use.


            Edit: just found her new website: http://www.evatstrengthandconditioning.com
            Last edited by Misabi; 06-19-2013, 02:16 PM.
            If you're interested in my (very) occasional updates on how I'm working out and what I'm eating click here.

            Originally posted by tfarny
            If you are new to the PB - please ignore ALL of this stuff, until you've read the book, or at least http://www.marksdailyapple.com/primal-blueprint-101/

            Comment


            • #66
              Thanks for asking this question. I've been wondering if I should find a box near me, work on my fitness and then find a box or just work on my own for a while now. This has been very helpful.

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              • #67
                Here are my pros/cons on Crossfit, coming from a 34yo female who was not remotely active before joining 1 year ago.
                Pros:
                - Gave me an introduction into weight lifting. Yes, I shouldn't have felt intimidated by the free weights section at the regular gym I sporadically attended, but I was. I had no idea what I was doing and felt like an idiot when I tried. Now I feel confident I could attend a regular gym and do weights and blend right in.
                - The community. First of all, I am not self-motivated when it comes to working out. I need a class structure, I need that accountability. My SO, on the other hand, does just fine going to the regular gym on his own (which is great, because we really couldn't afford 2 crossfit memberships!). My crossfit also does lots of social events, and I've made some really great friends who help inspire me.
                - I've never had that "exercise high" that I've heard people talk about, but I will say when I complete a WOD that I thought was totally beyond me, I am amazed and proud. Wiped out and disgustingly sweaty, but proud.

                Cons:
                - The cost. It is expensive. Average rates that I have seen are right around $150 a month. My fees are slightly higher, however my gym (can't get into the whole calling it a "box" thing) is strictly month-to-month, no contracts. They also offer a punch card option, which works out to be less if you only attend a couple times a week.
                - The programming can be, shall we say, not as well thought out as I'd like. Some coaches program more to their personal preferences and not necessarily on what would serve the members best as a whole.
                - Getting hurt. It happens. Does it happen more at crossfit than other styles of intense exercise? I don't know. I do agree with other posters that doing Oly lifts for time and in a large quantity is a recipe for pain. That is probably the biggest problem I have with crossfit as a whole. I don't think it is necessary to include those lifts in WODs. Teach them, sure, and let us do them slowly and for low reps for the strength, but don't make me do 15,20,30... snatches for time. I tend to just skip those days.

                As for your specific questions:
                1) Seems like they all vary to a degree. I've visited several crossfits, and while each was clearly doing crossfit WODs, they were all very different. For instance, mine does a 15-20 min guided warm up before getting going, one I visited recently just left everyone to their own devices for the first 20 min of class. Mostly minor stuff like that, but shop around, see which one feels like the best fit.
                2 and 3) Yes, people get competitive and get hurt. They also get sloppy and get hurt. I don't think this is specifically a crossfit phenomenon, although see my point above about Oly lifts in WODs- just avoid those days. Also, do some sort of yoga or stretching regularly.
                4) We have open gym times most days of the week. You can even go in and work on stuff while a class is going, so long as you stay out of their way. That also seems to vary a lot gym to gym.

                I'm not one of those people that thinks crossfit is the only way- I recognize there are many paths to fitness, and this may not even be one of the better ones. But it works for me. It keeps me motivated to go, which is my largest problem regarding exercise.

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                • #68
                  ^^^That "punch card option" sounds like a good idea. That way you would be paying per class not per month. I think that would be more conducive to giving yourself enough r&r in between workouts as opposed to going every single day even if you are in pain just because you already paid an insanely large amount for the month.

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                  • #69
                    I actually did the punch card option for my entire first year- this month was the first month I paid the monthly fee, mainly because I'm actually going often enough to justify it. I am not sure how common that option is though. If not available in your area, maybe see if you can just pay the drop-in fee per class when you attend. You would still more than likely have to complete the beginner course (usually called On-ramp or Elements). I found On-ramp very helpful, especially coming from my limited athletic background. It was nice to learn all the moves with a group of my peers, versus jumping into regular classes and not knowing what I was doing.

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                    • #70
                      As someone that is used to pointing out the problems with CF, mainly due to the ridiculous claims by SOME of its members (judging anything by its idiots is never a good idea, however), I have found that most of its problems can be overcome with small adjustments....you then end up with a hybrid CF routine that is very effective.

                      I.E.
                      "Not enough focus on strength, all met-cons, all high volume". Solution: Incorporate what a lot of competitive CF programmers have done for some time; workouts with a separate strength and conditioning part. I use Outlaw Way, and these are beyond brutal WODS that work.

                      "High injury risk due to timing workouts and poor form". Solution: YouTube each movement with reputable instructors, and practice with very low weight as a warm up before jumping into the actual WOD....as for timing, don't do it every time. Sometimes the work is going to kick your ass to the point that any extra lifts are going to be poor and CNS killers. Accept it and rest awhile. Time yourself as a test (just like with running), not as an every day training method.

                      "High cost". Solution: Punch-card membership, and use it to get your form down. Do them at home if you have the equipment, or at a super cheap GloboGym.

                      "Overtraining". Solution: I do a nasty CF workout twice a week, then 2 days of max-out weights with lots of rest in between (a powerlifting routine) to give my system a break. It's not good at 5x a week. It's very shoulder and knee heavy, so all but very polished oly lifters will cause some pretty severe inflam doing it more, IMO.

                      "Doing this sucks" => (My workout today from Outlaw Way) 12 min to set a one-rep max for power clean and snatch....rest 5 min....then "Helen", which = 400m run at race pace, then 12 70lb kettleball swings, then 12 strict form pull-ups.
                      ^^^ Translation. Spend ten min doing 6-7 one rep maxes of an Olympic lift, likely to the point that you drop the weight due to not being able to do it. Today that was dropping 185lbs from a height of 4 feet (missed the transition) in front of everyone at my gym. It was loud....then run a 5min mile paced 400m, and WHILE you are panting like a dog, do the KBs and pull-ups...THEN do it 2 more times. By round 3, you are doing to be in very severe pain. Look for a man walking around in all black with a sickle in his hand, bc you may think you are dying. That's normal.

                      Solution: Don't do Crossfit. It's very nasty, intense stuff that can and will get you hurt. I always feel like no one should "sorta do" CF, just as they shouldn't halfway do a Smolov squat progression or Ironman training. It is all hard, so you will really need to the whole eye of the tiger on your side to do it. On the other hand, it can make you a pretty rare breed of badass too
                      Last edited by TheyCallMeLazarus; 06-19-2013, 11:18 PM.
                      "The soul that does not attempt flight; does not notice its chains."

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                      • #71
                        PB my main concern for you would be attempting xfit on a keto diet. Once or twice a week may be manageable, but more frequently could get you in trouble. Obviously, I'm sure you're planning on advising any trainer/coach you decide to train with about your medical history and required dietary plan. How they respond could also be a good indicator of the quality of their knowledge and ability.
                        If you're interested in my (very) occasional updates on how I'm working out and what I'm eating click here.

                        Originally posted by tfarny
                        If you are new to the PB - please ignore ALL of this stuff, until you've read the book, or at least http://www.marksdailyapple.com/primal-blueprint-101/

                        Comment


                        • #72
                          I would say the same, Misabi. It uses a lot of glycogen, that work out.

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                          • #73
                            I find Crossfit is best used for conditioning work in place of hill-sprints, prowlers, etc.

                            EDIT: the reason for this is that CF is more convenient for me and I enjoy it, both the workouts and the social aspect. To be clear, I don't think there is anything wrong with sprints/prowlers, etc.

                            I do Wendler 5/3/1 2 or 3 times a week and CF 2 or 3 times a week.

                            I only go to CF sessions that fit in with 5/3/1 i.e. I won't do a WOD targeting shoulders the day before I am due to do presses on Wendler.

                            Being stronger will make you better at doing CF.
                            CF may not make you stronger, but it (or any other GPP method) will make you fitter.
                            Being stronger and fitter is better than being one or the other.

                            P.S. I pay per session (10). It isn't cheap, but it isn't scandalous considering the coaching you get, along with the social aspect. This value is of course dependent on having a decent coach and liking the people at your box...
                            Last edited by maclrc; 06-20-2013, 04:08 AM.

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                            • #74
                              Originally posted by TheyCallMeLazarus View Post
                              Spend ten min doing 6-7 one rep maxes of an Olympic lift, likely to the point that you drop the weight due to not being able to do it. Today that was dropping 185lbs from a height of 4 feet (missed the transition) in front of everyone at my gym. It was loud....then run a 5min mile paced 400m, and WHILE you are panting like a dog, do the KBs and pull-ups...THEN do it 2 more times. By round 3, you are doing to be in very severe pain. Look for a man walking around in all black with a sickle in his hand, bc you may think you are dying. That's normal.

                              Solution: Don't do Crossfit. It's very nasty, intense stuff that can and will get you hurt. I always feel like no one should "sorta do" CF, just as they shouldn't halfway do a Smolov squat progression or Ironman training. It is all hard, so you will really need to the whole eye of the tiger on your side to do it. On the other hand, it can make you a pretty rare breed of badass too
                              Not sure I really want or need to be that rare breed of badass.

                              Originally posted by Misabi View Post
                              PB my main concern for you would be attempting xfit on a keto diet. Once or twice a week may be manageable, but more frequently could get you in trouble. Obviously, I'm sure you're planning on advising any trainer/coach you decide to train with about your medical history and required dietary plan. How they respond could also be a good indicator of the quality of their knowledge and ability.
                              I think twice a week would be plenty for me.

                              Comment


                              • #75
                                You need one more opinion on here like you need a hole in the head

                                I did xfit for about 1.5 years and quit about 3-4 months ago. I'm just about to rejoin (I think...).

                                Why I left.

                                My coach was planning "exercise". This was fine. I went 4-5 days a week, stayed reasonably fit and in shape. My shoulders looked nice in my wedding dress. But after 1.5 years I was frustrated that I was no longer improving in my lifts. This was due to programming not having clear long term goals because it was planned a week at a time.

                                What this means for you:

                                If "exercise" is what you are looking for crossfit is a great way to get it - no matter what box you join. It will cost a lot. If you have disposable income try it out. You may find a great community that adds value to your life. Many people do. Their cultish reputation is true. But within that cult you have lots of happy people

                                If you want linear progression or whatever you want to call it - talk to the person doing the programming. Do they have long term goals? Are they tracking data to see if they are meeting goals? Are members aware of the goals (12 week cycles/8 week cycles, etc)? This is not guaranteed at each box.

                                Do you know how to snatch and clean & jerk? These are difficult lifts that need to be taught. They are useful at developing nearly every level of "fitness". Once you learn these movements you can continue to work on them without a crossfit membership fee if you wanted. Learning these movements would also allow you to follow any of the thousands of crossfit WODs posted on line every day.

                                Nearly all boxes offer drop-in packages - someone else recommended this option and I agree that it may be a good way to test the waters for a little less money.

                                Let us know what you do - I'm curious to hear your thoughts!

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