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  • #31
    Also, I think few, if any, of the top competitive xfitters got as strong as they are through just doing xfit. It looks to me like most come into xfit the beasts who then improve their conditioning to the required to compete. Even then v they are doing a hell of a lot more training than the basic xfit template, so when taking about xfit we need to be clear if we're talking about doing it to get fit/strong or to compete, as to me they are very different things. One could essentially compete in xfit while using other styles of training to prepare for it.
    If you're interested in my (very) occasional updates on how I'm working out and what I'm eating click here.

    Originally posted by tfarny
    If you are new to the PB - please ignore ALL of this stuff, until you've read the book, or at least http://www.marksdailyapple.com/primal-blueprint-101/

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    • #32
      I suppose I will weigh in as well.

      I understand people's bias AGAINST Crossfit (like quikky and Rich). While the gyms will tend to follow the same general outline of the Crossfit methodology, there are definitely less desirable gyms out there. I was in a gym that was run by two different sets of coaches and I had completely different experiences with both of them. I prefer the ones I have now.

      The biggest issue I have seen, injury wise, with Crossfit tends to be men that are in generally good shape but have never really done Olympic lifts before, or have been inactive for a period of time before beginning training. The injuries usually come from ego driven "I can lift more than this person over here" mentality and at a gym where the coaches are not as observant, it can be a bad environment.

      That said, I think Crossfit gyms, in general, have begun to take a more dedicated approach to bettering form of their Olympic lifts. I am looking to get Level 1 Trainer certified myself, but I am going to be attending some USA Weightlifting courses first. At my gym the past two months, we have had guest instruction from a Crossfitter that took three years off to study Oly lifts, for example.

      Bottom line, as with everything, there is good and bad. I love that I can work out in a more bootcamp style atmosphere, but with weights (but I am military). I say bootcamp because of the general group intensity level. You find a good class and you become friends with the people you workout with. You sweat and (if you accidentally knock yourself on a boxjump) you might even bleed a little with them. You get to throw heavy shit around in a (if you go to a good gym) safe environment. I started a year ago and am easily in the best shape of my lift.
      ~All luck is earned in the end.~

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      • #33
        Originally posted by sakura_girl View Post
        I would never do xfit because I wouldn't pay $150/month to be motivated by people when I was self-motivated to begin with. Just my opinion.
        Good Grok! It costs that much? Really?

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        • #34
          But you don't have to go to a xfit box to do xfit..
          If you're interested in my (very) occasional updates on how I'm working out and what I'm eating click here.

          Originally posted by tfarny
          If you are new to the PB - please ignore ALL of this stuff, until you've read the book, or at least http://www.marksdailyapple.com/primal-blueprint-101/

          Comment


          • #35
            Originally posted by Misabi View Post
            But you don't have to go to a xfit box to do xfit..
            You said there was a website? Anybody can get access to that?

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            • #36
              Originally posted by Paleobird View Post
              You said there was a website? Anybody can get access to that?
              Sure, anyone can access the daily WODs and how to videos, for free directly from the crossfit.com site, or go here for scaled versions of the wod to suit your ability: http://crossfitbrandx.com
              If you're interested in my (very) occasional updates on how I'm working out and what I'm eating click here.

              Originally posted by tfarny
              If you are new to the PB - please ignore ALL of this stuff, until you've read the book, or at least http://www.marksdailyapple.com/primal-blueprint-101/

              Comment


              • #37
                I first heard of crossfit as this great website that posted minimalist, military-style WODs that anyone could do, anywhere, with a minimum of equipment.
                Now its a gym franchise mania.

                Funny how complicated simple, zen, primal ideas can get when there's a chance to make money. I think the only simplicity left in Crossfit is the affectation of calling their gyms "boxes."
                Not saying they aren't great places. Just that they've evolved beyond the original idea, as I understood it.

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                • #38
                  First, the only experience of crossfit that I have is pseudo second-hand. I have clients who do crossfit, and I've also connected with the boxes in my area in an attempt to get them to incorporate some postural work/mobility work into their offerings for their clients.

                  I'm basically setting up some opportunities for myself and my practitioners to go in and teach the crew about what we do and how it helps -- starting with such tag lines as "No DownDog, No Snatch." (see that double entendre there? lol Inappropriate Yoga Teacher!).

                  In terms of what I"m seeing in my clients is that there's an overall change in fitness -- they seem to have quick results which plateau within a couple of months (say 3-4) -- their progress in yoga slows down a bit (they get tighter), and then usually there's some kind of shoulder injury or knee soreness that creeps in around this time (might be what causes the plateau).

                  The knee and shoulder injuries take some time to fix, the knee one usually coming out of the hips/improper form in deep body weight squats done in multiple sets for time, while the shoulder injury comes from. . . well usually a postural alignment problem combined with the shoulder-heavy workouts with weights or otherwise.

                  I do not advocate for or against CF, though some things give me -- personally -- some pause based on risk of injury. They often take a lot of strength and flexibilty to do certain moves, which are not 'beginner' moves that usually 'beginners' are doing.

                  Anyway, they do vary in their quality and how they work with you specifically, but it's not an environment or regimen that I -- personally -- would do well in, though I think it's an environment that a lot of people *can* do very well in, and it gives them a lot of support and motivation in their journey.

                  And that, i find particularly valuable. Also, i just like the people. Most of the cross fitters whom I know are just cool people.

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                  • #39
                    And FWIW, most of the injured students that I see are injured from a combination of their postural pattern plus their sport (repetitive motion) which is effectively "poor form" even if the form generally "looks right." Strange, that. Comes from other yoga studios, too, and all kinds of places. Lots of injured people. I attract them. Probably because I'm working on the same thing. And birds of a feather etc.
                    Last edited by zoebird; 06-19-2013, 01:48 AM.

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                    • #40
                      Originally posted by Paleobird View Post
                      I'm considering joining?
                      Originally posted by Misabi View Post
                      Sure, anyone can access the daily WODs and how to videos, for free directly from the crossfit.com site, or go here for scaled versions of the wod to suit your ability: CrossFit Brand X | Ramona, California | Powered by CrossFit
                      Paleobird thanks for starting this thread

                      Misabi that links great
                      When I'd had enough of the grain and starched based 'diabetic eating for health' diet (eating for health, my ass!) my weight was 242.5 lbs. On starting primal- 18th April 2013 weight : 238.1.
                      27th July 2013. weight after 100 days 136.9 weight lost 101.2lb ; that's 105.6lbs since I stopped the 'diabetic eating for health'
                      new journal http://www.marksdailyapple.com/forum...ml#post1264082

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                      • #41
                        I can second what MathFit posted. I'm not a trainer, but I've been Crossfitting for 3 years, and I love it. (Female, currently 56 years old.) I started by doing the WODs posted on crossfit.com by myself, then checked out my local box for more info. For me, working out with a group is much more fun than doing them by myself.

                        I also know how to listen to my body, and don't have the "disadvantage" of testosterone--I push myself, but I don't feel the need to compete against others; I compete against myself. The max number of WODs I'll do in a week is 4. Usually 2 WODs and one day with our Oly coach because I love the Olympic lifts and one day with our powerlifting coach.

                        My box has free Saturday WODs for anyone who wants to show up, and they don't include the technical lifts. You might want to see if any of the boxes near you have something similar.

                        My box has payment options... month to month, 6 month (with a discount), yearly (with more of a discount), and cancel whenever you want. I've seen that different boxes also have other options... pay less for only 2 days/week, etc.

                        Before I found Crossfit, I did the traditional big-box gym type workout, and I found it boring. I think 50% of what I like about Crossfit is the support and encouragement of our trainers and the friends I've made there. We also have social events (paleo BBQs, picnics, pot-lucks) and do fund-raising WODs for charities.

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                        • #42
                          Here's my experience. I'm a 42-year-old female, very short (just under 5 feet tall). About 10 pounds overweight at the first box; about 15 pounds overweight at the second.

                          I tried the first box two years ago; it's about 20 minutes from my house. I did the on-ramp sessions and rocked that for the two weeks. But then for the month that I did classes, I felt overwhelmed. Very crowded classes, so I didn't get a lot of individual attention. I felt a lot of pressure to Do! The! Reps! To be fair, that could have been how I perceived it. I was very insecure. My form was shoddy, and I wound up yanking something in my back. I didn't return.

                          I tried the second box last summer; it's about 15 minutes from my house. For the first month, I felt very encouraged - I wasn't the oldest person there, and while I was slow and had light weights (my best ever deadlift was 105 pounds; at the time, I weighed 110), I felt encouraged to do my best. But during the second month, I started feeling the Come! On! pressure. I came to realize that A) I hate the team race mentality and B) I strongly prefer one-on-one sessions.

                          I'm recovering from ACL surgery (tore it during taekwondo, sigh; 69 days before I hopefully get the all clear to return to TKD, which I miss terribly), so weightlifting hasn't been on the agenda. I'm going to try a bodyweight program, along with continuing my Couch To 5K program (building my endurance to return to TKD, and hey: sprints!). I may contact the owner of the second box and see if she does personal training. But if the bodyweight/HIIT sprint combo works, then I won't bother.
                          F, 44 years old, 111.8 lbs, 4 feet 11.5 inches (yes, that half inch matters!)

                          **1st place sparring, AAU TKD regional qualifier, 2/15/15 - It's damn good to hit like a girl!**

                          **First-ever 5K race 11/28/13: 37 minutes, 18+ seconds, no stopping**

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                          • #43
                            I think it would be cool if more places just offered straight up group weightlifting classes that focused on squats, deadlifts etc. That's the part I enjoy. If I go do that on my own at a gym, without a coach, no way will I push myself to go heavy. I looked for personal trainers, and around here, I didn't find anyone that did that type of lifting, nor were they affordable. My friend used to go to a place around here and pay something god awful like $500 a month to run on a treadmil and do bicep curls and bodyweight squats.

                            http://maggiesfeast.wordpress.com/
                            Check out my blog. Hope to share lots of great recipes and ideas!

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                            • #44
                              Originally posted by TheyCallMeLazarus View Post
                              * Crossfit, P90X, Insanity, other marketed stuff (Very effective, but usually a lack of long-term goal setting. Effective up to elite level)
                              * Elite athlete, bodybuilding, Ultimate diet, IF regimens (Capable of producing elite level definition, power, speed, or whatever is the goal)

                              Now, the reason people trash each other on every Crossfit discussion is because SOME Crossfit adherents like to act as if their regimen is superior to the last group. It's not, period. Keep in mind that most of these programs are very arduous to do, take a lot of patience, and are often highly protected by those that designed them. Crossfit is fine and has it's strengths and pitfalls, but it isn't a superior program to what guys like Martin Berkham, Lyle McDonald,or John Romaniello are putting out there. Same goes for elite coaches at colleges of all disciplines....so long as you recognize that, you will keep your expectations reasonable and not go for the hype portion of its programming.
                              Heh, based on your description, crossfit is actually perfect for me because I'm not at an elite level and am not delusional enough to think that I'll ever get there. So crossfit is effective for someone like me.

                              Originally posted by sakura_girl View Post
                              I would never do xfit because I wouldn't pay $150/month to be motivated by people when I was self-motivated to begin with. Just my opinion.
                              Well, it's not just the motivation. There's also the coaching. But if you already have a lot of athletic experience and don't need any coaching, then it would be less worthwhile for you.

                              I've been working out on my own for years and had no idea what I was doing. I learned on day 1 at crossfit (actually before day 1, I learned during the assessment) that I had been doing pushups wrong. Pushups! Yup. With the proper form, I actually can't do pushups on the floor at all. Not even one. Doing them improperly, I can do 10-15 in a row. Now I do them on a box (incline) with the proper form.

                              Originally posted by Paleobird View Post
                              Good Grok! It costs that much? Really?
                              Depends on the box. I pay $160/month now, and it is super expensive. I'm planning on moving back to the Bay Area soon and was looking at crossfit boxes in Oakland. I found out that Crossfit East Bay is only $71 per month, which is a lot more affordable. Crossfit Oakland, on the other hand, charges $199 with a 12-month contract. Yikes!

                              It's totally worth it though, IMO, if you have a job and can afford it. I just don't buy as many cute but mostly useless dresses anymore. And when I do buy stuff, it's mostly supplements and workout gear. More and more, I'm becoming one of those people who live to workout.

                              My journal

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                              • #45
                                Originally posted by magnolia1973 View Post
                                I think it would be cool if more places just offered straight up group weightlifting classes that focused on squats, deadlifts etc. That's the part I enjoy. If I go do that on my own at a gym, without a coach, no way will I push myself to go heavy. I looked for personal trainers, and around here, I didn't find anyone that did that type of lifting, nor were they affordable. My friend used to go to a place around here and pay something god awful like $500 a month to run on a treadmil and do bicep curls and bodyweight squats.
                                You need to find a good "black iron" gym and hire a trainer there. Or find a good partner and do a program on your own. I think you can search for Starting Strength certified coaches on that website as well.
                                The Champagne of Beards

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