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Is 30 minutes of jogging 4-6 times per week considered chronic cardio?

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  • Is 30 minutes of jogging 4-6 times per week considered chronic cardio?

    I know marathon running and excessively long steady state cardio is considered harmful, but where do you draw the line? Is 30 minutes too much to do on a regular basis? Is there a duration that would be appropriate for a primal lifestyle, or is it the steady unchanging pace that makes jogging any significant distance a poor exercise choice overall?

    Personally I enjoy jogging, although I've never really been in shape to go more than 30-45 minutes most of my life anyway. I find it gives me time to think and reflect, I suppose a long daily walk would provide the same time for introspection though.

    Thanks for any advice or perspective you guys can provide!
    __________________________________________________ _____________________________
    Eureka5280: M / 38 / 235lbs / Goal: 180lbs

    Diet: Currently experimenting with higher carb (Peat-esque) primal with emphasis on beef, dairy, seafood, sugar and a bit of starch on lifting days.

    Activities: Started Stronglifts 5x5 on 3/1/14. Adding sprints and hikes soon.
    End of Year Working Set Goals: Squats-250, Bench-200, DL-315

  • #2
    Some people would say yes, I disagree. If you like jogging then go for it. I like jogging too and have done it 4 to 5 times a week. I usually don't do more than 1 to 3 miles and a lot of times I alternate my running with walking intervals.

    Comment


    • #3
      If you are doing it because you enjoy doing it, then no. Jogging for 30 minutes will not raise your cortisol levels or cause inflammation. Chronic cardio is long, generally over an hour. Make sure you lift heavy things too.

      You may consider running fractally. Start your jog, after a warm up, pick a point 100 yards ahead or so, and run really fast to that point, then slow down (or even walk), then start again. The best part is that runners call that a fartlek, which is the funniest word I know, but I've got the mentality of a 10 year old boy! It's better than just running at the same pace.

      But the short answer is no, that's not chronic cardio.

      Comment


      • #4
        Thanks guys! I'll try to vary my pace a bit and get some sprints in there as well.
        __________________________________________________ _____________________________
        Eureka5280: M / 38 / 235lbs / Goal: 180lbs

        Diet: Currently experimenting with higher carb (Peat-esque) primal with emphasis on beef, dairy, seafood, sugar and a bit of starch on lifting days.

        Activities: Started Stronglifts 5x5 on 3/1/14. Adding sprints and hikes soon.
        End of Year Working Set Goals: Squats-250, Bench-200, DL-315

        Comment


        • #5
          Running might do nothing for you in terms of improving your appearance, but I don't thing it would hurt either. I run approx 25mi every week and love it.
          I like strength training too.

          Comment


          • #6
            I'll vote yes, seems like a lot of jogging. That's 3+ hours a week!

            Comment


            • #7
              30 min a day x 5 sessions weekly = 15 miles if you are slow, or about 25 miles weekly if you're on the fast side.. That is a lot of running.

              I would agree with the gist of the previous posters, but I would add this: As a previously competitive triathlete, I constantly am warning people against what "going jogging" means for so many of my friends. What it means is that they go out, pick a rough distance, and run it as fast as they can without passing out or vomiting....to put it bluntly, that is a very stupid way to run if you intend to get faster or run longer. The saying is "long slow runs make long, slow runners."

              I would look at running a given distance as fast as you can as "The Test". I recommend doing that no more than 1-2 a month. It is killer on your body in inflammation and everything else you don't want. "The Test" makes you weaker and slower. It is only meant as a means of tracking progress. The people that ignore that and simply "go run" is what makes it "chronic cardio" to me.

              Cardio in itself is not bad, but it must be regimented. It's not like gym work, where literally about any combination of heavy compounds will make you stronger. Cardio has the ability to make you LESS fit, and that is unique to it.

              Tempo runs (I heard Satan laughing for every one of those, pure misery), fartlek done spur of the moment, hills, pulls, all combined with a lot of LISS training (I hike Mt Mansfield in VT every Sunday, for example) is what will make you better at the beating that is pushing your pedal to the floor that is "The Test". You have to prepare first.

              Sisson has a name for those that don't understand this premise, but it is known in the endurance sport community very well. "Clydesdales", "Survival Shufflers", "Milage Donkeys" = the more polite "chronic cardio" label. The very elite level will start to resemble it due to the need to make the body adapt to the stressor, but it's a really nasty trap.

              Just vary it up, prob do a little less (I trained for full Ironman's with 4 days a week, 5-6 is excessive), and only take "The Test" when you get a free T-shirt at the finish line Good luck.
              Last edited by TheyCallMeLazarus; 06-05-2013, 01:04 PM.
              "The soul that does not attempt flight; does not notice its chains."

              Comment


              • #8
                Great comments guys! I guess what I really should be asking is this: What should I be doing to increase my cardio fitness and stamina as thoroughly and quickly as possible, while not putting my body at risk of excessive inflammation or tissue damage?

                If there is a better way to get my heart, lungs, and legs in shape so that I don't feel embarrassed trying to keep up with my friends on the mountain bike trail or on a tough 2 hour uphill hike then I am absolutely willling to replace jogging with whatever that is.

                Thanks again!
                __________________________________________________ _____________________________
                Eureka5280: M / 38 / 235lbs / Goal: 180lbs

                Diet: Currently experimenting with higher carb (Peat-esque) primal with emphasis on beef, dairy, seafood, sugar and a bit of starch on lifting days.

                Activities: Started Stronglifts 5x5 on 3/1/14. Adding sprints and hikes soon.
                End of Year Working Set Goals: Squats-250, Bench-200, DL-315

                Comment


                • #9
                  I'm 7.5 weeks into eating primal and I still run frequently, although the last couple of weeks work has made for fewer runs. I love to trail run, so I plan to keep doing it and I think I will still try for that 50K I'd planned before going primal. I usually run at a comfortable pace, with the occasional fartlek run when the mood strikes me. Lately since going primal, I'm more willing to forgo a run and go for a hike with my family or run with my 10-year old daughter who runs a 12+ minute mile. Personally I think if I am really enjoying it, it isn't doing harm. I find running to be a good way to clear my head as well.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Eureka5280 View Post
                    Great comments guys! I guess what I really should be asking is this: What should I be doing to increase my cardio fitness and stamina as thoroughly and quickly as possible, while not putting my body at risk of excessive inflammation or tissue damage?

                    If there is a better way to get my heart, lungs, and legs in shape so that I don't feel embarrassed trying to keep up with my friends on the mountain bike trail or on a tough 2 hour uphill hike then I am absolutely willling to replace jogging with whatever that is.

                    Thanks again!
                    1) You are not putting yourself at risk of excessive inflammation or tissue damage jogging 4-6x week for 1/2 an hour. Full stop.

                    That said,

                    2) Jogging 4-6 times a week for 1/2 an hour is the least efficient way to improve your fitness. You're better off doing 10 hill sprints (total time, about 15 minutes when you factor in the rest between sprints) or intervals (running for 1 minute faster than normal, walking for 2 minutes).

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Eureka5280 View Post
                      Great comments guys! I guess what I really should be asking is this: What should I be doing to increase my cardio fitness and stamina as thoroughly and quickly as possible, while not putting my body at risk of excessive inflammation or tissue damage?

                      If there is a better way to get my heart, lungs, and legs in shape so that I don't feel embarrassed trying to keep up with my friends on the mountain bike trail or on a tough 2 hour uphill hike then I am absolutely willling to replace jogging with whatever that is.

                      Thanks again!
                      Do tabata's on the bike. There is just too much evidence out there today coming from experts such as Barry Ross, that you want to do short intense sprints with a short period of rest to build up endurance. The second part is following his methods of resistance training to get stronger.

                      Everyone here knows me as a big BBS fan. However, Barry Ross teaches strength training without going to fatigue so that you can go to fatigue in the sport you enjoy.

                      (Barry Ross trains Olympic athletes such as the Chinese Speed Ice Skating team.)

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Vick View Post
                        Do tabata's on the bike. There is just too much evidence out there today coming from experts such as Barry Ross, that you want to do short intense sprints with a short period of rest to build up endurance. The second part is following his methods of resistance training to get stronger.

                        Everyone here knows me as a big BBS fan. However, Barry Ross teaches strength training without going to fatigue so that you can go to fatigue in the sport you enjoy.

                        (Barry Ross trains Olympic athletes such as the Chinese Speed Ice Skating team.)
                        +1

                        Tabata's on the stationary bike, strength training and daily walking. Wash, rinse, repeat. Increase the number of Tabata sets or increase the duration of the set to force adaptation. The strength training needs to be progressive too. Walking will get you time on your feet plus get the joints and connective tissues toughened up for the hiking.

                        Enjoy your new lifestyle. You'll be amazed at improvement over time without the huge time commitment and without slaying yourself through the workout grinder.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Wouldn't it all depend on your heart rate?

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Hunter gatherer humans probably did far more than that.

                            Given modern transport and abundance of food within arm's reach at any given moment, 30 minutes a day looks gigantic effort.

                            FYI, when i was in military academy, walking or anyother form of mechanised trasnport was prohibited during the first term. "On the double" was the only acceptable mode of transport. First term lasted 6 months and that meant we jogged a lot. Everyone came out much stronger after the term.
                            Few but ripe.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Eureka5280 View Post
                              I know marathon running and excessively long steady state cardio is considered harmful, but where do you draw the line? Is 30 minutes too much to do on a regular basis? Is there a duration that would be appropriate for a primal lifestyle, or is it the steady unchanging pace that makes jogging any significant distance a poor exercise choice overall?

                              Personally I enjoy jogging, although I've never really been in shape to go more than 30-45 minutes most of my life anyway. I find it gives me time to think and reflect, I suppose a long daily walk would provide the same time for introspection though.

                              Thanks for any advice or perspective you guys can provide!
                              Are you happy that you can only last 30-45 minutes? If not change the course. Decrease the time and increase the intensity.

                              Comment

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