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  • #16
    I think you would become a more useful, stronger human and that it is a great program, but if you want to add muscle and size you need to stimulate your central nervous system... which is difficult to do without a heavy barbell.

    Muscle + strength (from what you seem to have gotten in this thread) isn't built by high reps, its build by an intense heavy load on the body being pushed for a maximum effort of 1-8 reps (Depending on the weight).

    So for the PBF to work you'd need a weight vest that you could progressively add weight to as you grow stronger, forcing the body to adapt and grow. The weight required at first would be what you could complete a maximum of 8 reps with. Your rock idea would work, but I think it would be much more efficient (even safer in case you fell on jagged rocks... that can't be good for your back!) to invest in a weight vest with progressive weights.

    As the PBF dictates you can also increase the technicality of the exercises, which also forces an adaption. But a weight vest is critical here for your goal of muscle building / getting stronger. Otherwise you are just using it as exercise to burn calories, not gain strength.

    My 2c

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    • #17
      Originally posted by dabears View Post
      I think you would become a more useful, stronger human and that it is a great program, but if you want to add muscle and size you need to stimulate your central nervous system... which is difficult to do without a heavy barbell.

      Muscle + strength (from what you seem to have gotten in this thread) isn't built by high reps, its build by an intense heavy load on the body being pushed for a maximum effort of 1-8 reps (Depending on the weight).

      So for the PBF to work you'd need a weight vest that you could progressively add weight to as you grow stronger, forcing the body to adapt and grow. The weight required at first would be what you could complete a maximum of 8 reps with. Your rock idea would work, but I think it would be much more efficient (even safer in case you fell on jagged rocks... that can't be good for your back!) to invest in a weight vest with progressive weights.

      As the PBF dictates you can also increase the technicality of the exercises, which also forces an adaption. But a weight vest is critical here for your goal of muscle building / getting stronger. Otherwise you are just using it as exercise to burn calories, not gain strength.

      My 2c

      Ah...I get it now.You made it really clear,actually!Thank you very much for your help.
      Well,honestly,I'm not sure what I should do now...I guess I'll try the primal blueprint and increase the difficulty of the exercises.I'll try to use my 'rock' idea (I know you said it's not good but that's the only thing I can afford now) and maybe even get a weight vest.

      Right now I am at 5'3 and 108 lbs. I'm not looking to build HUGE bodybuilder looking muscles.Just enough so I would look "toned" and healthy.

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      • #18
        No problem. And you should be able to progress with your current setup, just be careful. Its additional weight, so its good!

        And don't worry, you won't suddenly look like a bodybuilder. Those individuals have trained for many many years with dedicated hard work, and also most likely in the 10-12 rep range (which builds more fluid based muscle, the "puffy" look). They also most likely used steroids to achieve their look as well. By staying in the 1-8 rep range you will build hard dense muscle, will absolutely not look like a bodybuilder, and achieve your goal of looking "toned". Women constantly use that word and think they need to do high rep dumbbell based workouts to "spot reduce" fat from the areas they are uncomfortable with, when in reality they need to lift heavy & build strength, and reduce their overall BF%.

        I think it would be very beneficial if you checked out this woman's story, and it is relative to this website as she made the switch to paleo as well.

        Meet Staci: Your New Powerlifting Super Hero | Nerd Fitness
        Last edited by dabears; 04-23-2013, 10:06 AM.

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        • #19
          Originally posted by dabears View Post
          Women constantly use that word and think they need to do high rep dumbbell based workouts to "spot reduce" fat from the areas they are uncomfortable with, when in reality they need to lift heavy & build strength, and reduce their overall BF%.
          Let's be honest. It's not the women who create this misconception. It's fitness magazines, personal trainers, and commercial gym equipment manufacturers.

          Here's a counterexample that proves the rule (Actually, Men's Journal is head-and-shoulders above Men's Health and the other fag rags):

          Everything You Know About Fitness Is a Lie - MensJournal.com
          The Champagne of Beards

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          • #20
            ^ completely agree with you, I wasn't saying they were the source of the problem... I see the source everyday and it bugs me to no end, but you just have to let it go.

            I've also read that article and it is a great one!

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            • #21
              Originally posted by dabears View Post
              No problem. And you should be able to progress with your current setup, just be careful. Its additional weight, so its good!

              And don't worry, you won't suddenly look like a bodybuilder. Those individuals have trained for many many years with dedicated hard work, and also most likely in the 10-12 rep range (which builds more fluid based muscle, the "puffy" look). They also most likely used steroids to achieve their look as well. By staying in the 1-8 rep range you will build hard dense muscle, will absolutely not look like a bodybuilder, and achieve your goal of looking "toned". Women constantly use that word and think they need to do high rep dumbbell based workouts to "spot reduce" fat from the areas they are uncomfortable with, when in reality they need to lift heavy & build strength, and reduce their overall BF%.

              I think it would be very beneficial if you checked out this woman's story, and it is relative to this website as she made the switch to paleo as well.

              Meet Staci: Your New Powerlifting Super Hero | Nerd Fitness
              Thank you!This was a very inspiring article.I changed my thinking about working out completely.I should have started this thread long ago before I starting a workout program that didn't fulfill my needs...

              Comment


              • #22
                Originally posted by RichMahogany View Post
                Let's be honest. It's not the women who create this misconception. It's fitness magazines, personal trainers, and commercial gym equipment manufacturers.

                Here's a counterexample that proves the rule (Actually, Men's Journal is head-and-shoulders above Men's Health and the other fag rags):

                Everything You Know About Fitness Is a Lie - MensJournal.com
                This is just what I needed to read.Thank you very much for your comment and for giving me the link to that article. Now,to get some heavy weights!...

                Comment


                • #23
                  Originally posted by LittleSparrow View Post
                  " Each workout takes approximately one hour " .No thanks. :/
                  Fair point, but I found that claim to be a little generous.

                  It varies, but I've been doing these programs comfortably inside 25 mins. No doubt the more difficult the exercise becomes, I will require the longer rest times.
                  I'll be back

                  Comment


                  • #24
                    Originally posted by dabears View Post
                    As the PBF dictates you can also increase the technicality of the exercises, which also forces an adaption. But a weight vest is critical here for your goal of muscle building / getting stronger. Otherwise you are just using it as exercise to burn calories, not gain strength.

                    My 2c
                    Sorry, but there are a lot of ways to continue progressing and building strength far beyond what PBF has listed, without adding weights. Yes, it is slower than lifting weights, but just as effective, and perhaps even more effective, depending on what you want to do with that strength.

                    After working up to 1-arm pushups, the strength and tension required keep me limited to a handful of reps, similar to a heavy bench press.

                    If you are doing lots and lots of reps of 1-arm pushups, then yes, you may have progressed beyond what your bodyweight can do for you in terms of strength, but that's a long way off for most people.

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                    • #25
                      when I posted that I thought this was a man looking to add size + strength, not just the latter.

                      in total agreement with you don't worry

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                      • #26
                        I would not rule out a program like simplefit. Its progressive and I would like to see most people complete level 8 in under 5 minutes. I try and get my rugby players to have some mastery of bodyweight training before I pile weight on their backs. From experience, its the right thing to do and certainly does not mean they are missing out or delaying adding strength/size etc.

                        Your central nervous system etc although incredible clever does not know when you put a 100kg bar overhead, or a 100kg log. It doesnt know the difference in a bench press or a pushup. Only the load is different. I personally find that I can more than bodyweight (205lbs) close grip bench press easier than I can a one arm pressup. Now the angles are different (unilateral bodyweight movement versus a classic barbell lift) and the loading is slightly different but the muscles involved are the same. My CNS only knows that it is being taxed.

                        To see a bigger difference we shouldnt compare bodyweight versus weight, but more realistically how we lift eg super slow, static hold, high rep/low rep etc.

                        Richard
                        Last edited by Richardmac; 04-24-2013, 08:04 AM.
                        It isn't the mountains ahead that wear you out....Its the grain of sand in your shoe.

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                        • #27
                          Have you tried incorporating pullups and chinups into your workout? They tone your back and core unbelievably well. You can buy a bar for over your door very inexpensively. If you cannot do many to start out you can use a box or chair to assist until you can do without. I would also recommend picking up some kettlebells because you can do a wide variety of leg exercises like squats, lunges, and swings.
                          Last edited by prime11; 04-24-2013, 08:14 AM.

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                          • #28
                            Bodyweight workouts are the way to go. Don't worry but it sounds like you might want to try a different approach. Simplefit is a great routine and here are a few other sites that could really get you going. Each site has video's tutorials and things you can purchase like books, Dvds etc.

                            www.boultertraining.com . This is a former Mixed Martial arts guy with an affinity for cats (weird but he could kick my butt and nearly everyone else's here). He breaks down bodyweights in a common sense method and knows his stuff.

                            Another would be Global Bodyweight training www.globalbodyweighttraining.com .The guy is a exceptional teacher and he's explains things in a more technical/scientific way. He can geta little long winded but agin he will break down the muscle groups, joints affected by each exercise. Both are truly solid and have ridiculous workouts and forums to ask questions.

                            If you want to add some real difficulty that will give you size but more importantly strength then I would check out www.madbarz.com. Great workouts (bodyweights again) that focus on using the pull-up bars/parallel bars at a local park. I recently built a pull-up bar in the backyard and love their workouts. You make them as instense as you can handle and never have to touch a weight besides your own. A good inspirational video for bar workouts would be Hannibal for King on Youtube. That guy is ridonkulous.

                            Hope this helps you.
                            Last edited by AppalachianMatt; 04-24-2013, 08:23 AM.
                            Today is a new day. You will get out of it just what you put into it. If you have made mistakes, there is always another chance for you. And supposing you have tried and failed again and again, you may have a fresh start any moment you choose, for this thing we call 'Failure' is not the falling down, but the staying down.

                            Mary Pickford

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                            • #29
                              Originally posted by AppalachianMatt View Post
                              Bodyweight workouts are the way to go. Don't worry but it sounds like you might want to try a different approach. Simplefit is a great routine and here are a few other sites that could really get you going. Each site has video's tutorials and things you can purchase like books, Dvds etc.

                              www.boultertraining.com . This is a former Mixed Martial arts guy with an affinity for cats (weird but he could kick my butt and nearly everyone else's here). He breaks down bodyweights in a common sense method and knows his stuff.

                              Another would be Global Bodyweight training www.globalbodyweighttraining.com .The guy is a exceptional teacher and he's explains things in a more technical/scientific way. He can geta little long winded but agin he will break down the muscle groups, joints affected by each exercise. Both are truly solid and have ridiculous workouts and forums to ask questions.

                              If you want to add some real difficulty that will give you size but more importantly strength then I would check out www.madbarz.com. Great workouts (bodyweights again) that focus on using the pull-up bars/parallel bars at a local park. I recently built a pull-up bar in the backyard and love their workouts. You make them as instense as you can handle and never have to touch a weight besides your own. A good inspirational video for bar workouts would be Hannibal for King on Youtube. That guy is ridonkulous.

                              Hope this helps you.

                              This does help me,thanks! I was looking for websites like that for a long time.Thanks for taking your time to write them down and explain!

                              Comment


                              • #30
                                Hey guys, I wanted to ask a question about this program. If you are adding weight with a weight vest to the max capacity training plan, could you build muscle? is the timing protocol, of doing 50 seconds of work, 10 seconds of rest, or 20/10 a problem for building muscle? If you increase the weight, you can still increase intensity and keep the workout short. If you do it as a circuit with 4 exercises then you are still resting each muscle group for 3 minutes between sets, allowing for the muscle to recover between sets, but during that time you are working other muscles. this will be demanding on the cardiovascular system but should still be able to build muscle, right?

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