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I don't want to use barbells but I want to get strong.

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  • I don't want to use barbells but I want to get strong.

    Ok, I posted a while back asking about the differences between bodyweight and barbells.

    Im a huge fan of bodyweight but wanted to get some more mass and strength.
    I was thinking on using sandbags to achieve this.

    I realise that barbells have the benefit of being able to consistently add weight and the barbell makes everything efficient.
    However, a barbell seems painfully boring and I wanted to do something at home and that's fun.
    I have no desire to be able to deadlift or squat 400+lbs.
    However, I know with a sandbag I can load it up to atleast 100kg and I can dead lift it, squat, shoulder press etc and get all the benefits of "functional strength"

  • #2
    You shoudl be fine with that and other forms of odd object lifting.

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    • #3
      Ever tried kettlebells?

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      • #4
        Never tried kettlebells :/

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        • #5
          You say you want to get strong, but you say you don't want to squat or deadlift 400. Seems like you don't really care about getting strong.

          Install a pullup bar, make a 50 lb sandbag, build a slosh tube, buy an ab wheel, make your own version of a suspension trainer, hang a rope in a tree, and go nuts. Get a walker for the elderly and do dips on it. Then you can both have fun making everything and have fun using it.

          My idea of fun at the moment is watching the weight on the barbell increase every week. To each his own.
          The Champagne of Beards

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          • #6
            I would say I'm strong, for a 130lbs woman. However, I have decided to increase my strengths by using the barbell. I have no imaginary interest in anything near 400lbs. However, I do want to be able to get to twice my body weight on deadlifts and squats. Right now, using only body weight, kettlebells and bands to build strength, I can do my body weight in both. It isn't very impressive, but considering last week was my first attempt ever, I'll take it. My point is, you can do barbells without extreme "to you" goals.
            Primal since 4/7/2012

            Starting weight 140
            Current weigh 126

            www.jenniferglobensky.blogspot.com

            Jennifer

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            • #7
              I want to be "functionally" strong and build muscle. Spending years working up to crazy weights with barbells, as I said, seems painfully boring.
              Plus, I really don't see the use of being able to squat that much, what object in life requires that much strength that you wouldn't have someone else just help you?

              My point is, I like to mix it up, and I wanted to get strength and muscle gains from doing stuff other then barbells. Seeing as this is a "primal" website id figure I'd get some good responses, but instead I get the usual Jacking of to Mark Riptoe response.

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              • #8
                Por que no las dos?

                Integrating Bodyweight and Barbell Training | Eat. Move. Improve.

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                • #9
                  I'd seriously look into kettlebells. When used properly, you can definitely get strong with them. Yes, in terms of gaining pure strength they are not as efficient as barbell training, but you get so many other benefits (general conditioning), plus you can do it easily from home. Check out Strongfirst and RKC. I'm doing a 16 week fat loss programme at the moment (Geoff Neupert) but as soon as that is done I may start to experiment with double heavy kettlebells, which I am told is brutal and with which you can definitely get strong like an ox.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Lockstock View Post
                    I want to be "functionally" strong and build muscle. Spending years working up to crazy weights with barbells, as I said, seems painfully boring.
                    It sounds like you think that lifting weights using barbells provides no improvement whatever until the exerciser reaches the elite stage. Why would you think that? I have always found improvements noticeable within weeks of taking it up again.

                    Plus, I really don't see the use of being able to squat that much, what object in life requires that much strength that you wouldn't have someone else just help you?
                    So who says you have to squat "that much" and how much is "that much"?

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Lockstock View Post
                      I want to be "functionally" strong and build muscle. Spending years working up to crazy weights with barbells, as I said, seems painfully boring.
                      Plus, I really don't see the use of being able to squat that much, what object in life requires that much strength that you wouldn't have someone else just help you?

                      My point is, I like to mix it up, and I wanted to get strength and muscle gains from doing stuff other then barbells. Seeing as this is a "primal" website id figure I'd get some good responses, but instead I get the usual Jacking of to Mark Riptoe response.
                      Did you even read my response, or just decide to be offended and react like a child? I gave you several ideas precisely along the lines of what you asked.

                      The point isn't just that you might need to lift something alone that weighs 400 lbs. It's that when you can lift 400 lbs, it's a lot easier to lift 70 or 80 lbs several times. Or carry a friend out of a burning building. Whatever.

                      As I said, if getting that strong isn't your goal, there's plenty of fun, cool options like those I suggested above.
                      The Champagne of Beards

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                      • #12
                        I honestly have no doubt barbells are incredibly effective but like I said. Id rather something to do at home, kettle bells and sandbags interest me. Especially Kettle bells.

                        With the Kettle bells, I'm not just talking met con, I'm talking heavy heavy bells doing strength type movements. It just seems more fun.

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                        • #13
                          Weight vest for up to 70lbs. Now go do weighted pullups, dips, pushups, and squats. You may have some limits as to leg training, but it takes some real strength to outgrow a 70lb weighted pull up for reps.... and if you do grab a weight belt and throw a 45 on it.

                          I do a set of 5-8 exercises from the book "foundation training" that really hits the posterior chain. All body weight. Highly recommend it if your not doing the squats and deadlift. I actually do it once or twice a week and do the DL once every two weeks.

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Lockstock View Post
                            I want to be "functionally" strong and build muscle. Spending years working up to crazy weights with barbells, as I said, seems painfully boring.
                            Plus, I really don't see the use of being able to squat that much, what object in life requires that much strength that you wouldn't have someone else just help you?

                            My point is, I like to mix it up, and I wanted to get strength and muscle gains from doing stuff other then barbells. Seeing as this is a "primal" website id figure I'd get some good responses, but instead I get the usual Jacking of to Mark Riptoe response.
                            Sorry, I thought you just didn't have the 400 lbs goal. Get some kettlebells and good training, they are fun and activities are seemingly endless. Using them correctly is key.
                            Primal since 4/7/2012

                            Starting weight 140
                            Current weigh 126

                            www.jenniferglobensky.blogspot.com

                            Jennifer

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by RichMahogany View Post
                              Did you even read my response, or just decide to be offended and react like a child? I gave you several ideas precisely along the lines of what you asked.

                              The point isn't just that you might need to lift something alone that weighs 400 lbs. It's that when you can lift 400 lbs, it's a lot easier to lift 70 or 80 lbs several times. Or carry a friend out of a burning building. Whatever.

                              As I said, if getting that strong isn't your goal, there's plenty of fun, cool options like those I suggested above.
                              That, and also the fact that barbells represent an ideal environment, which doesn't carryover 100%. What this means is that a 400lb deadlift means that in a framework where you have a comfortable to hold, perfectly symmetrical object, your body can generate enough force against gravity to lift 400lb off the ground. This doesn't mean you can lift a 400lb person, or a 400lb box, because they are more awkwardly shaped, with different weight distribution. However, what it does mean, is that a person with 400lb "ideal environment" strength can be of more help in lifting a 400lb person or box than a person who lifts a lot less.

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