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Any point in learning to lift heavy?

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  • Any point in learning to lift heavy?

    I've been taking a weights class twice a week for a year or so now. I love it and it has helped me get strong and fit. Along with eating primal I have lost weight and inches and feel great.

    Now I have the opportunity to learn to lift heavy (whatever that means, I only have the vaguest idea).

    It kind of intrigues me but on the other hand I am not into extremes and do not want to risk injuring myself when I'm feeling the best ever.

    So, just wondering, what would be the point in me upping the ante here? Pros and cons? Other suggestions for new goals.

    My details: Age 48, Gender F, height 5'4", weight 59kg.
    Annie Ups the Ante
    http://www.marksdailyapple.com/forum/thread117711.html

  • #2
    What sort of equipment were they using in the weights class you took, and what sort of lifts did they teach you to do?

    Comment


    • #3
      Just a bar with whatever size plates on it you want to use - from 1kg to 5kg. Squats, lunges, deadlifts and rows, chest press and tricep dips, bicep curls, upright row and overhead press (or whatever you would call it). Interspersed with some cardio and step tracks.
      Annie Ups the Ante
      http://www.marksdailyapple.com/forum/thread117711.html

      Comment


      • #4
        Weightlifting is a great way of keeping yourself healthy as you age. If you have an opprtunity to learn, please do. Proper form is important to avoid injuries and get the best out of it.
        Advantages of lifting are huge. First of all, lifting heavy will mean that you keep age related muscle loss (sarcopenia) at bay. Muscle loss starts early - from 30 years or so. Heavy lifting is a great way way to build it or keep from loosing muscle. You are unlikely to gain much muscle at your age although it is not impossible but keeping what you have and making it all stronger is worth the effort. Higher muscle mass is related to higher bone density, better neural function, better metabolic rate, better hormonal and mental health - the benefits are endless. Things like grip strength in older people are correlated closely with life expectancy.
        I am 31 and have started weightlifting a couple of years ago for all of the above reasons. I think it is the best thing I could do from fitness perspective to keep myself healthy and slow down the ageing.

        Comment


        • #5
          Most research on older women seems to have been done using light weights. I think if you do lift heavy, you will put on muscle, perhaps not enough to look muscular or add much lean body mass, but certainly enough to look more toned than ever before.

          I think you should find a gym where they do powerlifting, so you can get help when you need it.

          Comment


          • #6
            http://startingstrength.com/articles...e_sullivan.pdf

            Read this. You'll decide to lift heavy.
            The Champagne of Beards

            Comment


            • #7
              also, lifting heavy weights will help stave off the onset of osteoporosis.
              http://www.cantneverdidanything.net/

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by catdance62 View Post
                also, lifting heavy weights will help stave off the onset of osteoporosis.
                When I was a teenager, my mother and I were the same height. When she was the age I am now, she had lost a couple of inches, and I was taller than her. I have not lost any height. In fact I have gained a little since putting up the pullup bar and height markings behind it. I attribute that to back stretching exercise.

                She has taken calcium supplements her whole life, but has never done any exercise. I did a lot of heavy exercise in my 30s.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by eKatherine View Post
                  When I was a teenager, my mother and I were the same height. When she was the age I am now, she had lost a couple of inches, and I was taller than her. I have not lost any height. In fact I have gained a little since putting up the pullup bar and height markings behind it. I attribute that to back stretching exercise.
                  That's fascinating. Yet another reason to continue my deadlifts and overhead squats.
                  be the hair that knots with my hair
                  - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
                  primal since oct. 1, 2012

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Do it. Because it's great fun, if for no other reason. It'll also make you feel awesome!

                    Best thing I ever did.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by RichMahogany View Post
                      http://startingstrength.com/articles...e_sullivan.pdf

                      Read this. You'll decide to lift heavy.
                      Damnit man, I'm at work here... but I cannot follow a link to that article without reading it.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by spuggygirl View Post
                        Do it. Because it's great fun, if for no other reason. It'll also make you feel awesome!

                        Best thing I ever did.
                        *high five*

                        plus, doing deadlifts gives you an excuse to wear fun knee-socks

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by spuggygirl View Post
                          Do it. Because it's great fun, if for no other reason. It'll also make you feel awesome!

                          Best thing I ever did.
                          This.
                          Dark chocolate and coffee, running through my veins...

                          Fitocracy Workout Tracker:
                          https://www.fitocracy.com/profile/Shadowknight137/?feed
                          MFP Food Diary:
                          http://www.myfitnesspal.com/food/diary/Shadowknight137
                          (Date is New Zealand Time UTC+ 12hours)

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Annieh View Post
                            I've been taking a weights class twice a week for a year or so now. I love it and it has helped me get strong and fit. Along with eating primal I have lost weight and inches and feel great.

                            Now I have the opportunity to learn to lift heavy (whatever that means, I only have the vaguest idea).

                            It kind of intrigues me but on the other hand I am not into extremes and do not want to risk injuring myself when I'm feeling the best ever.

                            So, just wondering, what would be the point in me upping the ante here? Pros and cons? Other suggestions for new goals.

                            My details: Age 48, Gender F, height 5'4", weight 59kg.
                            I think lifting heavy means that you will specifically attempt to make progress in how much you can lift. In other words, strength training, as opposed to just exercising.

                            The pros of strength training:
                            - It really feels great to see progress. It's quite reinforcing to put more weight and succeed in lifting what you could not lift before.
                            - Building muscle feels great.
                            - Building muscle tells your body that you are still growing and if you are growing you are not dying. It's healthy. It stimulates all sorts of healthy hormones in your body.
                            - You will probably have to eat a lot more. Some women feel this is a good thing.

                            The cons:
                            - You can outlift your capabilities and hurt yourself. I did that. So be careful and don't be afraid to take your progress slower if you need to. Progress is progress.
                            - Your waist might get smaller and your thighs bigger. Pants seemed designed for big waist, tiny thighs so this will make you mad.
                            - You will probably have to eat more to get stronger. Most women struggle with this, especially with giving themselves permission to eat enough.
                            Female, 5'3", 50, Max squat: 202.5lbs. Max deadlift: 225 x 3.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by sbhikes View Post
                              Your waist might get smaller and your thighs bigger. Pants seemed designed for big waist, tiny thighs so this will make you mad.
                              Oh, yes, this drives me nuts. I'm a guy, and 80% of the jeans out there are now "skinny" or "slim", which I don't think can even fit around my arms, much less legs. I basically always have to choose baggy pants, or go up in waist size. So annoying!

                              I also noticed some stores are doing the same with dress shirts. I tried on these nice shirts recently, one size my arms would literally not fit in the sleeves. A size larger and my arms would fit very tight but there would be a giant amount of space in the stomach area, like you could easily fit a basketball in there.

                              It seems fashion is designed for men with big stomachs, and tiny arms and legs. Spider fit?

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