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Any point in learning to lift heavy?

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  • #16
    Originally posted by quikky View Post
    I tried on these nice shirts recently, one size my arms would literally not fit in the sleeves. A size larger and my arms would fit very tight but there would be a giant amount of space in the stomach area, like you could easily fit a basketball in there.
    Oh this made me laugh.
    Annie Ups the Ante
    http://www.marksdailyapple.com/forum/thread117711.html

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    • #17
      Originally posted by sbhikes View Post
      I think lifting heavy means that you will specifically attempt to make progress in how much you can lift. In other words, strength training, as opposed to just exercising.

      The pros of strength training:
      - It really feels great to see progress. It's quite reinforcing to put more weight and succeed in lifting what you could not lift before.
      - Building muscle feels great.
      - Building muscle tells your body that you are still growing and if you are growing you are not dying. It's healthy. It stimulates all sorts of healthy hormones in your body.
      - You will probably have to eat a lot more. Some women feel this is a good thing.

      The cons:
      - You can outlift your capabilities and hurt yourself. I did that. So be careful and don't be afraid to take your progress slower if you need to. Progress is progress.
      - Your waist might get smaller and your thighs bigger. Pants seemed designed for big waist, tiny thighs so this will make you mad.
      - You will probably have to eat more to get stronger. Most women struggle with this, especially with giving themselves permission to eat enough.
      Oh thanks for this feedback. I do love to eat, and I am already at a stage where I have enough muscle that I need to/can afford to eat plenty. In fact sometimes it's already annoying like on a workout day, I get so hungry and roam around looking for more food. I will weight up your other points, thanks.
      Annie Ups the Ante
      http://www.marksdailyapple.com/forum/thread117711.html

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      • #18
        Originally posted by spuggygirl View Post
        Do it. Because it's great fun, if for no other reason. It'll also make you feel awesome!

        Best thing I ever did.
        Thanks Spuggy, and it seems there are plenty who agree with you.
        Annie Ups the Ante
        http://www.marksdailyapple.com/forum/thread117711.html

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        • #19
          Originally posted by RichMahogany View Post
          http://startingstrength.com/articles...e_sullivan.pdf

          Read this. You'll decide to lift heavy.
          Excellent article, thankyou Rich.
          Annie Ups the Ante
          http://www.marksdailyapple.com/forum/thread117711.html

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          • #20
            I think there is no reason NOT to lift heavy, and every reason to give it a go!! What's the worst that can happen, really? (Uh... I can't think of any... aside from not fitting stupid clothes designed for fat people!)

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            • #21
              So, how heavy is heavy? Does one just keep building up the amount of weight you can use.
              Annie Ups the Ante
              http://www.marksdailyapple.com/forum/thread117711.html

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              • #22
                Yeah, just progressively heavier weights. What's heavy for you today will be your warmup in the future

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                • #23
                  Yep, a little more each time if you can manage it. Most of these programs will tell you to lift a certain weight for 3 sets of 5 reps or so (they vary) and if you can do that, next time you add 10lbs, 5lbs or in my case 1 or 2lbs. Basically, your workout always sucks the same amount but you get to write down bigger and bigger numbers in your log book. I went from squatting 45lbs to 125lbs. I'm back down to 100lbs as I work my way up again after I hurt myself a month ago. I want to make sure I don't out-lift my poor glute strength and hurt myself again.
                  Female, 5'3", 50, Max squat: 202.5lbs. Max deadlift: 225 x 3.

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                  • #24
                    Originally posted by sbhikes View Post
                    Basically, your workout always sucks the same amount but you get to write down bigger and bigger numbers in your log book.
                    When you put it that way, it sounds silly.
                    The Champagne of Beards

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                    • #25
                      Heavy lifting has all the benefits listed already. A couple of other important ones that are emphasized inBody by science is improved insulin resistance as well improved body temperature regulation which is nice when you get older.

                      You might want to make sure you have decent core strength before pushing too much with weights. Planks are great.

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                      • #26
                        Originally posted by miata View Post
                        You might want to make sure you have decent core strength before pushing too much with weights. Planks are great.
                        You don't think squats, presses, and deadlifts build core strength?

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                        • #27
                          Originally posted by RichMahogany View Post
                          When you put it that way, it sounds silly.
                          I can relate to that. It's always hard. It never gets any easier because as soon as you can do the weight you add more weight. I kind of dread every session but it's such a rush as soon as I get that first lift out of the way.
                          be the hair that knots with my hair
                          - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
                          primal since oct. 1, 2012

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                          • #28
                            Originally posted by quikky View Post
                            You don't think squats, presses, and deadlifts build core strength?
                            Sure they do. If you ease into them then sure. Planks are a really safe way of strengthening core. I do the BBS big 5 (chest press, leg press, rows, pull downs and overhead press) and find that the planks have a much bigger impact on on abs and over core including balance, etc.

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                            • #29
                              Originally posted by miata View Post
                              Sure they do. If you ease into them then sure. Planks are a really safe way of strengthening core. I do the BBS big 5 (chest press, leg press, rows, pull downs and overhead press) and find that the planks have a much bigger impact on on abs and over core including balance, etc.
                              So, to summarize: Your informed opinion as someone who doesn't squat or deadlift is that planks have a more profound impact on your "core" than squatting, and deadlifting?

                              Planks are a great exercise, but stabilizing your trunk while holding yourself up on your elbows and toes can't compare to stabilizing your trunk while pulling 2 or 3 times your body weight.
                              The Champagne of Beards

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                              • #30
                                Originally posted by RichMahogany View Post
                                So, to summarize: Your informed opinion as someone who doesn't squat or deadlift is that planks have a more profound impact on your "core" than squatting, and deadlifting?

                                Planks are a great exercise, but stabilizing your trunk while holding yourself up on your elbows and toes can't compare to stabilizing your trunk while pulling 2 or 3 times your body weight.
                                I actually do squats once a week in addition to BBS with the leg presses. They are definitely good for core, and you can feel them getting worked while you are going up and down with the weight. My point is that planks are a decent safety measure and complementary to squats and dead lifts. I ignored core for most of my life and now that I have more of a focus I feel like I have more control when lifting -- I'm using more of my body.

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