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  • #16
    Are you eating enough calories? You gotta up them pretty big time on your lifting days, including upping your carbs.

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    • #17
      [QUOTE=quikky;1155606]Noooo! That's exactly what they're not supposed to be. In fact, this exact confusion is why Rippetoe took down the charts in the first place. They have just recently been resurrected, and the categories are just I, II, III, IV, and V, to avoid associating them with level of advancement.

      Settle down. Rip changing the categories to numbers doesn't change a thing other than added ambiguity. Don't be hatin' just because you're still in the untrained category ;P
      "The problem with quoting someone on the Internet is, you never know if it's legit" - Abraham Lincoln

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      • #18
        Originally posted by Fernaldo View Post
        Settle down. Rip changing the categories to numbers doesn't change a thing other than added ambiguity. Don't be hatin' just because you're still in the untrained category ;P
        It doesn't change a thing, and that thing is exactly what I said:

        The Strength Standards Tables are back up.

        Don't spread the confusion around.

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        • #19
          Originally posted by quikky View Post
          It doesn't change a thing, and that thing is exactly what I said:

          The Strength Standards Tables are back up.

          Don't spread the confusion around.
          Use those charts and follow them as doctrine!

          Lighten up Francis. "OMG don't read those charts. You may consider yourself a novice!!!" Seriously....

          Please stop posting, everyone's IQ is going down.
          "The problem with quoting someone on the Internet is, you never know if it's legit" - Abraham Lincoln

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          • #20
            Originally posted by Fernaldo View Post
            Use those charts and follow them as doctrine!

            Lighten up Francis. "OMG don't read those charts. You may consider yourself a novice!!!" Seriously....

            Please stop posting, everyone's IQ is going down.
            There's a reason they were taken down originally. It's an important reason, because LP is cut short most times without the mistake of misinterpreting a table.

            If you don't care and want to act like an immature ass, go ahead, but those who care about their training will benefit from knowing what the tables represent.

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            • #21
              Originally posted by 01tj View Post
              Do you take off weeks? I usually take a week off about every two months and usually come back more motivated
              Originally posted by GKL View Post
              Take two weeks off. I know it sounds like an eternity and I'm sure your panicking about what you'd lose, but you'll proabably end up ahead in every respect. There is a ton of research (much of which has been referenced on PB by Mark) supporting the idea that extended de-loads help, not hurt.
              I took a week off in December over my winter break, and another in February when I was sick. I de-loaded when I came back, but did in fact find it easier to build back up. Another break might be in order, there have been some weeks when I didn't make it for all three workouts (I know skipping a day is heresy!). Maybe I'll take some time off when I start my race training.

              Originally posted by Stacy15 View Post
              Was going to post asking if anyone had results with SL and would recommend it, and here you are already talking about it. So thought I might chime in if you don't mind. Is it changing your body shape for the better along with gaining strength?
              Honestly, not really. I haven't noticed much difference, but then again I haven't been taking measurements like I probably should. Visibly, I can see some slight increase in definition in my legs and butt, and a little bit of extra mass in my shoulders/neck area, but even that might be in my mind. It certainly hasn't been a dramatic change. (I should probably start tracking measurements and taking comparison pictures.)

              This could be due to simply not eating enough. If you're looking to add mass, it seems you need to take in exorbitant amounts of calories with lots of protein and good carbs. This is probably a significant reason I'm stalling in my lifts now, too. Muscle mass = strength. I should try a calorie tracker for a week and see how much I'm actually ingesting.

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              • #22
                Originally posted by quikky View Post
                There's a reason they were taken down originally. It's an important reason, because LP is cut short most times without the mistake of misinterpreting a table.

                If you don't care and want to act like an immature ass, go ahead, but those who care about their training will benefit from knowing what the tables represent.
                Because in the grand scheme of things, cutting LP short is a travesty!!! Look, everyone realizes that you want to milk the gains from LP. And each individual has to make that determination themselves and take steps to move to the next level. Once you start to stall in a particular exercise, periodization is used to push past and further adapt.

                The chart is simply a loose reference for body weight and weight lifted. If you're 190 pounds and benching 400, I pretty certain you are past your LP gains. Again the chart is a reference, what you do with it is up to you, if you're moron, well you probably shouldn't be lifting heavy things above your head in the first place. People like to measure themselves against others... "how strong am I in relationship to others"? I said nothing about determining training protocol based on that chart.

                You think that someone would look at this chart and say, "Holyshit, my press is exactly 135 pounds, I need to switch to the texas method!!!" even when they are adding weight to the bar every workout? Or is it more likely that a person stalls, stalls and stalls and the realizes they need to do something different regardless of the chart?
                "The problem with quoting someone on the Internet is, you never know if it's legit" - Abraham Lincoln

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                • #23
                  Originally posted by prufock View Post
                  Honestly, not really. I haven't noticed much difference, but then again I haven't been taking measurements like I probably should. Visibly, I can see some slight increase in definition in my legs and butt, and a little bit of extra mass in my shoulders/neck area, but even that might be in my mind. It certainly hasn't been a dramatic change. (I should probably start tracking measurements and taking comparison pictures.)

                  This could be due to simply not eating enough. If you're looking to add mass, it seems you need to take in exorbitant amounts of calories with lots of protein and good carbs. This is probably a significant reason I'm stalling in my lifts now, too. Muscle mass = strength. I should try a calorie tracker for a week and see how much I'm actually ingesting.
                  I'm female so not looking to add mass or get super strong, just nice strong looking muscles and strong enough to come in handy for every day things. The 5x5 seems like a reasonable plan for lifting heavy. Tried for a few days now and liking it, so I guess I will see what happens!

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                  • #24
                    Originally posted by Fernaldo View Post
                    The chart is simply a loose reference for body weight and weight lifted. If you're 190 pounds and benching 400, I pretty certain you are past your LP gains. Again the chart is a reference, what you do with it is up to you, if you're moron, well you probably shouldn't be lifting heavy things above your head in the first place. People like to measure themselves against others... "how strong am I in relationship to others"? I said nothing about determining training protocol based on that chart.

                    You think that someone would look at this chart and say, "Holyshit, my press is exactly 135 pounds, I need to switch to the texas method!!!" even when they are adding weight to the bar every workout? Or is it more likely that a person stalls, stalls and stalls and the realizes they need to do something different regardless of the chart?
                    There are countless stories of people blaming programming when the problem is recovery. Back when Rip was more patient, there was a post probably daily of someone asking what they should do because they've stalled. In most cases the answer would be to eat more and keep going, i.e. they were still novices and just did not realize they had to keep gaining weight, even after they gained some already, until progress genuinely stalled due to exhaustion of linear progress.

                    Many of these people, when they see a chart like that, potentially reaffirm this belief, "oh yeah, squats are super hard now, and I have an intermediate/III squat, so I should probably go ahead and switch to intermediate programming". How many people on this forum, who are new to lifting, who are doing Starting Strength, will correctly interpret this table? I don't know, but why not point out what the table is and is not, and maybe save a few from much slower progress?

                    Yes, it's up to the individual to interpret data. However, considering most people are still novices (and most will stay that way), I felt it was important to ensure they do not use the table as an additional reason to change their programming. I'm honestly not sure why you keep arguing with me and trying to trivialize this point. You seem to agree with me, and yet you try to fight me on pointing this out. I don't get it.

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                    • #25
                      I'm doing a calorie survey using fitday.com this week to see if I'm eating enough. One day recorded, it looks like I'm eating plenty. Estimated about 3700 kcals yesterday, but I don't know if that's typical (always eat more on lifting days), so I'm going to average over a week. Would normally need about 2600 to maintain my weight, but I'm not gaining. It could simply be that I'm maxing out on my novice gains, as they are called. At the rate I'm at now, I'll be switching to 1x5 in a few weeks, at least on some exercises, with plans to eventually try madcow or switch to something new. Thanks for all the feedback.

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