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Two cents on cross fit wanted ?

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  • #31
    To the OP: do you have to pay by the individual workout? If so then increasing the number of times per week may not have been a recommendation made in your best interest.
    Female, 5'3", 50, Max squat: 202.5lbs. Max deadlift: 225 x 3.

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    • #32
      If I give you two cents on crossfit I'm gonna need some change.

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      • #33
        Originally posted by Goldie View Post
        I read this whole thread. There are good pro- and con-arguments for Crossfit here.

        My POV:
        --I've Crossfitted for 3 years and never gotten injured.
        --The beauty of the WODs is that they can be scaled. There's no way, at age 56, 5'2" and 108 pounds, that I'd be able to do some of the WODs at the RX weight. That's okay with me. I do the best *I* can do. Seeing the higher RX weights up there motivates me to do as much as I can.
        --I Crossfit 4 times a week; one of those times is with an Olympic weightlifting coach, and another is with a powerlifting coach.
        --(I also do PBF move-frequently-at-a-slow-pace.)
        --I have never puked, nor have I ever suffered from rabdo. The only time I've known anyone at my box to puke after a WOD was a friend who has acid reflux (I wish I could get her to go with PB eating!) I've never known anyone who's suffered from rabdo, and I've been a fitness "freak" my whole life.
        --Any of my coaches can explain the methodology behind any of the WODs. They also make sure we all use proper form, and make us scale down/don't let us continue if there's a chance for injury. (That's just smart business.)
        --Crossfit is not for everyone.
        --Crossfit is not for everyone. (Repeated for emphasis!)

        To the OP: I'd suggest you add in one WOD per week and see how you feel. Because the WODs can be scaled, you can always do additional WODs for technique improvement and go with lighter weights and/or don't worry about your time--as you see fit. Go with what works for you!

        Second that, great advise.

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        • #34
          Originally posted by Goldie View Post
          I read this whole thread. There are good pro- and con-arguments for Crossfit here.

          My POV:
          --I've Crossfitted for 3 years and never gotten injured.
          --The beauty of the WODs is that they can be scaled. There's no way, at age 56, 5'2" and 108 pounds, that I'd be able to do some of the WODs at the RX weight. That's okay with me. I do the best *I* can do. Seeing the higher RX weights up there motivates me to do as much as I can.
          --I Crossfit 4 times a week; one of those times is with an Olympic weightlifting coach, and another is with a powerlifting coach.
          --(I also do PBF move-frequently-at-a-slow-pace.)
          --I have never puked, nor have I ever suffered from rabdo. The only time I've known anyone at my box to puke after a WOD was a friend who has acid reflux (I wish I could get her to go with PB eating!) I've never known anyone who's suffered from rabdo, and I've been a fitness "freak" my whole life.
          --Any of my coaches can explain the methodology behind any of the WODs. They also make sure we all use proper form, and make us scale down/don't let us continue if there's a chance for injury. (That's just smart business.)
          --Crossfit is not for everyone.
          --Crossfit is not for everyone. (Repeated for emphasis!)

          To the OP: I'd suggest you add in one WOD per week and see how you feel. Because the WODs can be scaled, you can always do additional WODs for technique improvement and go with lighter weights and/or don't worry about your time--as you see fit. Go with what works for you!
          Third this as well.

          On a side note, I've been having to try REALLY hard to not jump in on this topic, because OP seems to enjoy Crossfit, as do I, and I was pretty pissed when this turned into a "Why I hate Crossfit and think it's bullshit" thread. People will think I'm too thin skinned or whining or whatever, but part of why I stay behind the scenes on this forum and in others is that there is a certain pretentiousness in the fitness world that makes all of us collectively look like assholes. We're on the same team here, right guys?

          Quick Edit: Initially I did Crossfit three times, now I'm up to four and occasionally five per week. I listen to my body. When I'm hurting, I take a break.
          ~All luck is earned in the end.~

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          • #35
            I go four times a week. Mondays, Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays. I think there's a bit of a push to go 6 days a week, but I NEED the time off! I also do roller derby training twice a week, and all up I think that's enough for my body (bear in mind, 12 months ago I wasn't doing any more than walking...).

            It may be different for someone younger... and while I try never to think in terms of age stopping me from doing something, I do TRY to be aware that my body MAY need a little more recovery now than it did when I was 20 (I'm 40 next month).

            Edited to add... when I first started CrossFit I went three times a week (M, W and F) and did that for about a month.

            I think you have to do what feels right for YOU! I would go from 3 to 4 times a week if you want to see how you go, but I wouldn't jump from 3 to 5 straight away.
            Last edited by Iron Fireling; 04-07-2013, 10:06 PM.

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            • #36
              I think for any fitness activity, be it Crossfit or walking, you are the only one who can determine how much you can take. If at three days a week, you are getting the benefits you desire, why change? If you feel you need more, go more. If 3 days works great, why worry about how often others go?

              We got into this on the Insanity thread, but ultimately YOU are in charge of your fitness and keeping yourself injury free. Let common sense guide you. For example, we did Wall balls on Sunday. I can't do wall balls quickly as they hurt my knees unless I go slow. So no, when the instructor sets a goal of 40 a minute, *I* won't do that. The girl next to me did. Our bodies are different. I deadlifted more than her.

              Hopefully in group fitness situations, you have a good instructor that understands everyone performs at a different level. But you also have to have the common sense to dismiss their instruction if you know it does not pertain to you.

              http://maggiesfeast.wordpress.com/
              Check out my blog. Hope to share lots of great recipes and ideas!

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              • #37
                Originally posted by ChaserBD04 View Post
                On a side note, I've been having to try REALLY hard to not jump in on this topic, because OP seems to enjoy Crossfit, as do I, and I was pretty pissed when this turned into a "Why I hate Crossfit and think it's bullshit" thread. People will think I'm too thin skinned or whining or whatever, but part of why I stay behind the scenes on this forum and in others is that there is a certain pretentiousness in the fitness world that makes all of us collectively look like assholes. We're on the same team here, right guys?
                So you think it would be better if no one disagreed with one another, and we would all march to the same band, so to speak?

                Part of the reason I go to forums is specifically to hear other opinions, even those I might really disagree with.

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                • #38
                  Originally posted by quikky View Post
                  So you think it would be better if no one disagreed with one another, and we would all march to the same band, so to speak?

                  Part of the reason I go to forums is specifically to hear other opinions, even those I might really disagree with.
                  Not at all, but this wasn't the thread for that. OP probably doesn't mind but if I'd posted that same initial question, where I clearly enjoyed a certain workout and was merely asking for opinions on frequency, the last thing I would want is a three page discussion on how what I felt was working pretty good for me was trash.
                  ~All luck is earned in the end.~

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                  • #39
                    Originally posted by ChaserBD04 View Post
                    Not at all, but this wasn't the thread for that. OP probably doesn't mind but if I'd posted that same initial question, where I clearly enjoyed a certain workout and was merely asking for opinions on frequency, the last thing I would want is a three page discussion on how what I felt was working pretty good for me was trash.
                    Sure, the thread was not exactly about what we all think of CrossFit, but it was related in the sense the OP was asking about higher frequency and injuries, and my opinion was more general. Realistically though, almost all threads spawn off side discussions. I mean, how many threads are there with multiple pages that stay precisely on the original topic?

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                    • #40
                      Okay, folks, I finally weighed-in, and here is the results for scaled X-fit inspired workouts (same reps, lower weight and no time constraint) and 5x5 lifting (what I could manage weight as well)

                      5x5 (2 months), SW ~ 120 lbs, LBM ~ 99 lbs; 2 month 5x5 (did it before, came to the end of linear progression) bulked up to 132 lbs, 107 lbs LBM

                      X-Fit Inspired: SW ~ 129 lbs, 102 lbs LBM. ~ 1 month. End weight: 135 lbs, 105 lbs LBM

                      In both cases, eat to satiation, some minimal cardio. So, in my case, slow heavy lifting is more doable and puts on more muscle mass. In all likelihood it is because I am not athletic, so X-fit is too much above my head. Bummer, I really liked X-Fit style workouts.
                      My Journal: http://www.marksdailyapple.com/forum/thread57916.html
                      When I let go of what I am, I become what I might be.

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                      • #41
                        Originally posted by Leida View Post
                        in my case, slow heavy lifting is more doable and puts on more muscle mass. In all likelihood it is because I am not athletic, so X-fit is too much above my head. Bummer, I really liked X-Fit style workouts.
                        Or because what you call "slow heavy lifting" provides a more appropriate stimulus for adding muscle mass in a novice/detrained individual (that's not meant in a pejorative or derogatory manner, it's just a way to describe someone who's not already within spitting distance of their genetic strength potential).
                        The Champagne of Beards

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                        • #42
                          I wish I was at the point where I was worried about scaling up the daily crossfit workouts. That won't be for a while, though.

                          For me, Crossfit is ideal and I enjoy going five days a week. The box I go to seems to have a good plan for the WODs they design and I haven't witnessed anyone throwing up, getting injured, getting rhabado, etc. I scale the workouts as needed to push myself but to not go crazy. I use my own discretion.

                          Maybe someday my goals will change and I'll look to do something else. For now, though, I am very happy with crossfit.
                          5-24-10 ................ 5-24-11
                          Weight: 281.......... Weight: 203

                          10-11-10
                          Weight: 259
                          Total Cholesterol: 243
                          LDL: 188
                          HDL: 40
                          Trig: 96

                          2-18-11
                          Weight: 228
                          Total Cholesterol: 239
                          LDL: 183 (calc), 138 (actual)
                          HDL: 46
                          Trig: 49

                          6-23-11
                          Weight: 197.2
                          Total Cholesterol: 225
                          LDL: 161 (calc), 120 (actual)
                          HDL: 56
                          Trig: 38

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                          • #43
                            I stopped my Crossfit gym membership for a number of reasons that I won't go into here, but I have one simple and very relevant question for those who are pro Crossfit and on this forum:

                            How is Crossfit not chronic cardio?

                            At the box I was a member of, which is one of the largest and most well-respected on the East Coast, almost every session was a one hour chronic cardio session for 99% of the 'athletes', who were huffing and puffing like crazy 2 minutes into the warm-up. And the 'warm-up' was always at least 10 to 15 minutes long. Followed by a few minutes of instruction, followed by the WOD which was anywhere from 15 to 45 minutes. So, at best, we're taking 30 minutes (and usually closer to 60 at my box) of a very high heart rate. Oh, and unless you truly are an 'athlete', or you are NOT following the CrossFit ethos of 'giving it your all'/high intensity, then rest assured that you are doing chronic cardio (i.e., your heart rate is way high for an extended period of time).

                            And here's the next million-dollar question: what benefit is there to doing olympic lifts quickly, over doing olympic lifts slowly? Isn't the goal to rip up muscle, in order to force an adaptation? I would think that that is done more efficiently by going at low intensity but with more weight?

                            I'm not saying whether CrossFit is bad or good (although I can say with certainty that the 'Coach' that started it, and Dave Castro his lackey, are undeniably a couple of douchebags - I'm simply saying that talking about CrossFit in this forum, on this site, should be like going into an Alcoholics Anonymous forum and asking whether Jacquins Vodka is better than Absolut'! The only thing 'primal' about CrossFit is the movements themselves. Squatting, lifting, sprinting, is all great. But not strung together at high intensity, multiple times per week. That is the very definition of 'chronic cardio' and is not healthy for those who are not already very high level athletes.

                            Now, as a once in a while 'sprint' session or a 'test yourself' session? Absolutely.

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                            • #44
                              Originally posted by mark2741 View Post
                              And here's the next million-dollar question: what benefit is there to doing olympic lifts quickly, over doing olympic lifts slowly? Isn't the goal to rip up muscle, in order to force an adaptation? I would think that that is done more efficiently by going at low intensity but with more weight?
                              This is one of my big points too. Doing Olympic lifts for high reps is a failure to understand the purpose behind Olympic lifts. Olympic lifts are tools for increasing power. Not strength per se, power. Power is strength over time, i.e. explosiveness. This is one the most fundamental metrics of athleticism. In almost any sport, basketball, football, MMA, tennis, heck, even golf, the athlete that can explode the best is almost always the better athlete.

                              The body's power is centered at the hips, and decreases the more you go towards the extremities. Doing a power clean, for example, helps teach your body how to express strength very quickly, largely from the hips.

                              Doing these lifts for high reps is too light to drive power increases, and too fatiguing to ensure proper form. Anyone who has done Olympic lifts knows that they can be very taxing. For example, this is why Starting Strength has you do power cleans for 5 sets but only 3 reps each. You quickly lose the ability to properly generate power with a heavy weight and form quickly begins to deteriorate.

                              If the goal is conditioning, there are much better tools such as sprints, the Prowler, HIIT rower work, etc. I don't see a single good reason to do Olympic lifts for high reps.

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                              • #45
                                I have a weird hatred of crossfit, ultimately I want everyone to be healthy however they so choose, but I'm 26, and was a soft out of shape kid in highschool, so I read fitness articles from all the big names and books, and I taught myself everything, all the things crossfit does have been around for years I just get mad that everyone pretends like it's brand new. Really? busting my ass will get me in shape? who knew! .....anyway....

                                I don't think it's that great, lift heavy, get super strong, and buy the prowler from EliteFTS...

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