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Two cents on cross fit wanted ?

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  • #16
    If you can't explain the programming, it means you don't understand it and/or it has not been presented to you clearly. Since that is the case, how can you determine that the coaches you work with are indeed the good ones?

    One last point I wanted to make was in regards to qualifications. You said many of the coaches you work with have been in the industry for a long time and have a long list of credentials, on top of which are their CrossFit certifications. Well, that might make them good at coaching whatever non-CrossFit stuff they know, but it doesn't translate to CrossFit per se. Specifically, a weight lifting coach might be great at teaching and programming for Olympic lifting, a running coach might be great at teaching running technique and training runners, a gymnastics coach... etc. This has carryover to teaching specific movements and techniques but not CrossFit programming.
    These two paragraphs tell me that we have fundamentally different viewpoints on both the role of coaches and the way they do their jobs--and actually, on Crossfit in general, as a mode of exercise--so I don't think we're ever going to get on the same page no matter how much we go back and forth. I extend my olive branch and wish you luck with your endeavors.

    OP, I've been Crossfitting 5x/wk for 8 months. I've yet to be injured, and keep getting stronger and faster. My best advice is to do a couple weeks at 5x, then take a deload week, and reassess how you feel then.

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    • #17
      I take X-Fit workouts from the main site, and normally, once I drop the weight down (normally to like 1/3 of the posted) to what I can handle for the number of reps, and ignoring the time frame, they surprisingly allow for perfect recovery. The one notable exception was the workout on March 23rd, with 150 wall throws tired me out too much to do double jumps right after, and I landed badly and twisted my knee. I am planning to start again tomorrow, after doing a simple workout of OHP/PP and elliptical yesterday & hopefully swimming today, but I will stop once I feel fatigued next time or at least substitute plyometrics, which is the most dangerous part of the X-fit for me.

      If there is one thing that X-fit doesn't integrate that I wish they did, it's swimming and aquatic workouts.
      Last edited by Leida; 04-05-2013, 07:24 AM.
      My Journal: http://www.marksdailyapple.com/forum/thread57916.html
      When I let go of what I am, I become what I might be.

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      • #18
        Originally posted by Leida View Post
        I take X-Fit workouts from the main site, and normally, once I drop the weight down (normally to like 1/3 of the posted) to what I can handle for the number of reps, and ignoring the time frame, they surprisingly allow for perfect recovery. The one notable exception was the workout on March 23rd, with 150 wall throws tired me out too much to do double jumps right after, and I landed badly and twisted my knee. I am planning to start again tomorrow, after doing a simple workout of OHP/PP and elliptical yesterday & hopefully swimming today, but I will stop once I feel fatigued next time or at least substitute plyometrics, which is the most dangerous part of the X-fit for me.

        If there is one thing that X-fit doesn't integrate that I wish they did, it's swimming and aquatic workouts.
        Do you know what intensity they're meant to be done at? Obviously if you decrease the intensity enough and remove time constraints, recovery will not be an issue. I can run marathons almost daily without recovery issues because I scale them down to 2.62 miles.

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        • #19
          Originally posted by heatseeker View Post
          These two paragraphs tell me that we have fundamentally different viewpoints on both the role of coaches and the way they do their jobs--and actually, on Crossfit in general, as a mode of exercise--so I don't think we're ever going to get on the same page no matter how much we go back and forth. I extend my olive branch and wish you luck with your endeavors.

          OP, I've been Crossfitting 5x/wk for 8 months. I've yet to be injured, and keep getting stronger and faster. My best advice is to do a couple weeks at 5x, then take a deload week, and reassess how you feel then.
          I'm not sure what you mean by different views on coaching. I just want to know the exact methodology behind CrossFit programming and no one can tell me what it is.

          That said, if you feel confident in your coaches, by all means carry on. I'm certainly not trying to tell anyone what to do with their body.

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          • #20
            Originally posted by quikky View Post
            Do you know what intensity they're meant to be done at? Obviously if you decrease the intensity enough and remove time constraints, recovery will not be an issue. I can run marathons almost daily without recovery issues because I scale them down to 2.62 miles.
            Basically, CrossFit is perfectly appropriate for the general public as long as they don't.actually.do.CrossFit
            The Champagne of Beards

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            • #21
              Originally posted by RichMahogany View Post
              Basically, CrossFit is perfectly appropriate for the general public as long as they don't.actually.do.CrossFit
              Appropriate scaling doesn't mean you are "not doing crossfit". By that logic running a 5K isn't running because it's not a marathon.

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              • #22
                Do you know what intensity they're meant to be done at? Obviously if you decrease the intensity enough and remove time constraints, recovery will not be an issue. I can run marathons almost daily without recovery issues because I scale them down to 2.62 miles.
                Absolutely. IMO one should do what's interests them and doesn't cause injury and over-training. The goal is to get healthy, not to wreck one's life. Again, just in my humble, the valuable part of cross-fit is how it strings exercise together, the selection of movements and rep ranges, how it shifts focus and alleviates workout boredom. Scaling down is a perfectly good concept and you can get all the benefits of working out 3 days on/ 1 off with a great variety and challenging moves. I simply look up how many rounds the elite cross-fitters posted for each day and repeat the average of their reps. Usually takes me about 2-3 times longer, but I am not claiming to be an athlete of any degree. Just someone who likes keeping as fit as she can be. Better gifted people would get kicks from competing at the goal level. I am perfectly fine with calling it Leida's Workout, not Cross-Fit.
                Last edited by Leida; 04-05-2013, 10:07 AM.
                My Journal: http://www.marksdailyapple.com/forum/thread57916.html
                When I let go of what I am, I become what I might be.

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                • #23
                  Originally posted by stormcrow View Post
                  Appropriate scaling doesn't mean you are "not doing crossfit". By that logic running a 5K isn't running because it's not a marathon.
                  No. By that logic, running a 5K isn't marathoning. It's running a 5k.

                  Greg Glassman didn't invent Power Cleans or Muscle Ups. CrossFit is a program. If you're doing something other than the program, it may be good, but it isn't the program. Drop the weights, change the order, change the spacing, and you're doing "CrossFit-influenced circuit fitness." Which is fine if it fits your goals. But it's not CrossFit.
                  The Champagne of Beards

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                  • #24
                    Originally posted by Leida View Post
                    I am perfectly fine with calling it Leida's Workout, not Cross-Fit.
                    +1. Of course this doesn't mean you can use Leida's Workout as a data point to make the argument that CrossFit is appropriate for the majority of people (not saying you were, just making a point).
                    The Champagne of Beards

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                    • #25
                      Never have understood the whole Cross Fit thing. I will stick with 531 and running hills. God I hate running hills but love the way it makes me feel.

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                      • #26
                        Well, I guess, I just pointed out under which conditions Leida WODs did not lead to over-training. FWIW, I recovered quicker from those sessions of 50+ of everything much faster than from 3x5 and 5x5 schemes, and was able to carry the insane amount of reps workouts on the 3 on, 1 off schedule as posted, while the best way I could maintain heavy lifting schedule with comparable recovery was 1 day lifting/2 day recovery. Unfortunately, with my injury, I can't yet tell if the rep-mania resulted in the muscle growth which is my goal (and a reason I went after the rep-mania stuff).

                        I would also want to make a general point, that in my view, in fitness it is important to customize the workout, no matter which one. You ,and only you know what you can and cannot do and how much is enough. And that only by trial and error. Even in a group fitness setting/class, even with a PT, you know the best, and you are ultimately in charge. (off the soap box).
                        My Journal: http://www.marksdailyapple.com/forum/thread57916.html
                        When I let go of what I am, I become what I might be.

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                        • #27
                          Originally posted by RichMahogany View Post
                          No. By that logic, running a 5K isn't marathoning. It's running a 5k.

                          Greg Glassman didn't invent Power Cleans or Muscle Ups. CrossFit is a program. If you're doing something other than the program, it may be good, but it isn't the program. Drop the weights, change the order, change the spacing, and you're doing "CrossFit-influenced circuit fitness." Which is fine if it fits your goals. But it's not CrossFit.
                          So no one at any Crossift box is doing crossfit unless they are doing the RX weight? How do you expect people to start? Crossfit has scaling built in.

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                          • #28
                            He might have been referring to the posts indicating that most crossfit 'boxes' don't even follow the WOD from crossfit HQ...

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                            • #29
                              Originally posted by stormcrow View Post
                              So no one at any Crossift box is doing crossfit unless they are doing the RX weight? How do you expect people to start? Crossfit has scaling built in.
                              The problem is not following the HQ programming and methodology, not exact weights.

                              The whole "CrossFit is scalable to everyone from 9 to 90" thing is a load of crap and further proves my point that CrossFit has no structure. Let me give a concrete example:

                              Suppose a WOD calls for doing box jumps, alternating with 225lb deadlift for 10 reps. I think there was actually a WOD like that a while back. Now, suppose you have two people, one with a 300lb max deadlift, the other with a 500lb max deadlift. They both can do the WOD as prescribed. Did they both do the same workout? In terms of number of reps and weight used, yes, but not in terms of intensity. The person with the 300lb deadlift had to work a lot harder to do the same workout, and thus will produce a different adaptation, and will need a different recovery protocol.

                              Proper scaling is not just scaling down because you can't do a certain exercise or use a certain weight, it's also about scaling up to get the proper intensity that a particular workout is supposed to be performed at.

                              Does HQ address this? No. Does HQ explain how to scale it, i.e. is the deadlift supposed to be approximately a 10 rep max, or is it supposed to feel light? No. That's exactly the problem, there is no reasoning behind this. If there is, it's been kept secret because I can't find it.

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                              • #30
                                Originally posted by Tod View Post
                                My Crossfit schedule has been 3 times per week, now the schedule will offer our time slot 5 days a week everyone is on board for the five days a week however, I have reservations about getting burned out or injured ? What are your thoughts ???
                                Thanks
                                I read this whole thread. There are good pro- and con-arguments for Crossfit here.

                                My POV:
                                --I've Crossfitted for 3 years and never gotten injured.
                                --The beauty of the WODs is that they can be scaled. There's no way, at age 56, 5'2" and 108 pounds, that I'd be able to do some of the WODs at the RX weight. That's okay with me. I do the best *I* can do. Seeing the higher RX weights up there motivates me to do as much as I can.
                                --I Crossfit 4 times a week; one of those times is with an Olympic weightlifting coach, and another is with a powerlifting coach.
                                --(I also do PBF move-frequently-at-a-slow-pace.)
                                --I have never puked, nor have I ever suffered from rabdo. The only time I've known anyone at my box to puke after a WOD was a friend who has acid reflux (I wish I could get her to go with PB eating!) I've never known anyone who's suffered from rabdo, and I've been a fitness "freak" my whole life.
                                --Any of my coaches can explain the methodology behind any of the WODs. They also make sure we all use proper form, and make us scale down/don't let us continue if there's a chance for injury. (That's just smart business.)
                                --Crossfit is not for everyone.
                                --Crossfit is not for everyone. (Repeated for emphasis!)

                                To the OP: I'd suggest you add in one WOD per week and see how you feel. Because the WODs can be scaled, you can always do additional WODs for technique improvement and go with lighter weights and/or don't worry about your time--as you see fit. Go with what works for you!

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