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Best body weight workout at home book

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  • #31
    Select selective indoor exercises to work at your home. You may found much variety of exercises and videos to best practice at home. Search on internet and follow the instructor videos for your body fitness.
    Last edited by John Miller; 04-05-2013, 11:06 PM.

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    • #32
      You'll have to take a break once in a while to actually exercise.

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      • #33
        I'm currently doing a routine combining fitness666 and Overcoming Gravity and I've been making very good progress/strength gains from it.

        Here would be my suggestions:


        Fitness 666


        Overcoming Gravity by Steven Low


        As already mentioned Raising The Bar and the upcoming Pushing The Limits by Al Kavadlo


        You Are Your Own Gym and Body By You by Mark Lauren (he also has a Bodyweight Training dvd and a You Are Your Own Gym 3 dvd set) My wife also bought the YAYOG iPad app and says that it is very good too.


        Convict Conditioning 1 and 2 by Paul Wade (also has available dvd's for each of the "big six" exercises listed in the first book)

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        • #34
          Since I don't have an access to the gym I do Max Capacity Training. Max Capacity Training - 12 Week Bodyweight Workout Plan look it up!It's a great workout.

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          • #35
            Anybody know if bodyweight exercise stimulates bone growth the way weights do? I've read, for example, that highly competitive bicyclists sometimes get osteoporosis; some think it's because your body weight is supported all the time. Another theory is that bikers are out sweating for prolonged periods (I've done some really long rides, 8-9-10 hours) and you lose calcium in sweat. But anyway, any information out there?
            10/2/12: 169 lbs, 37"waist
            Now: low 150's, 33" waist
            Blog: http://paleopathologist.com/

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            • #36
              Convict conditioning, or you are your own gym are really good.

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              • #37
                Anybody know if bodyweight exercise stimulates bone growth the way weights do? I've read, for example, that highly competitive bicyclists sometimes get osteoporosis; some think it's because your body weight is supported all the time. Another theory is that bikers are out sweating for prolonged periods (I've done some really long rides, 8-9-10 hours) and you lose calcium in sweat. But anyway, any information out there?
                i dont know if body weight exercises stimulate bone growth but i have always been told you need impact to do this. so running vs walking. this is a CW teaching. however, if you think about it, how can waving a few light dumbbells around stimulate bone growth and doing a body weight chin up wont? i know which one is a whole lot harder from a pure weight lifting pov. i dont know any long term cyclists with osteo either but they are all men. i do doubt the sweating thing as anyone who did any form of chronic cardio would surely have the same problem or people who live in very hot countries.

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                • #38
                  Originally posted by seaweed View Post
                  well i went to the gym this week and was bearing in mind this
                  Pull Up Progression - YouTube

                  i still reckon the lower half is the hardest. i gave it a go did it and then kept heading up and did a whole pull up on my own! no jumping or assistance. technically it is a reverse pull up but still. i was stunned. i managed another one so it wasnt a fluke. i have since found a metal soccer goal where i pick the kids up from school and the bars at the kids school i can use for pull ups. and i have managed more. the kids school also has a metal pole too!
                  Congratulations! I am very jealous!
                  Female, 5'3", 50, Max squat: 202.5lbs. Max deadlift: 225 x 3.

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                  • #39
                    i can tell you what i did to get there. you can bench as much as me so you should be fine. i *know* everyone has theories about what muscles recruit what but typically i have always been able to do all the progressions up till the actual movement. so none of them have helped per se. all i did this time was once a week when i am at the gym. i do sets of plyo chin ups. so you jump a little or a lot, try to pull yourself up the rest of the way. isometric hold at the top and then controlled negative. we do sets of 5,4,3,2,1. then forget about it till the next week and go do everything else. oh and with a set of 15 close reverse grip ( like the chin up grip ) lat pull downs at 60lbs and 10 at 75lbs to warm up. i did this for maybe 5 weeks. each week you can jump less and pull yourself up more on the first couple of each set. then, last week, i just did it. i had had a hummingbird day the day before which may have been a co-incidence. i also let go of my deep seated fear i would have to have huge shoulders and biceps to do one as i saw a youtube of a scrawny skinny chick doing one. i still dont believe i did it but so far i can still do one chin up on all the bars i have found.

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                    • #40
                      Yesterday I did the assisted pullup machine. I hadn't used it in a while. I left off ready to move down to 75lbs of assistance. Wow, that's not much assistance anymore. I am so sore, oh my god! I could barely eek out 5 reps and a couple times not even that. I thought I would pee my pants or have an orgasm a couple of times from the effort, which would have been highly uncomfortable and embarrassing. I will have to try your controlled negatives method. The height of all the chinup bars has always been an issue for me, though. You can't tell me jumping is cheating because that is the only way I can reach one.
                      Female, 5'3", 50, Max squat: 202.5lbs. Max deadlift: 225 x 3.

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                      • #41
                        we have a box with steps on which sits under the pull up bars at my gym. i can reach them if i stand on the box. i am 5ft 51/4". you could even do an Al and see if you can find some bars in a playground. finally LOL a benefit of having small shreiking kids is you have cover for doing that sort of stuff. my old gym had an assisted pull up machine but it just had numbers on it. 1,2,3,4 etc with 1 being the hardest. everyone says that the assisted pull up machines dont help. i never got beyond 3 so i cant say. remember to do the isometric hold at the top and try really hard to do a controlled slow negative the whole way down. IMO it is the bit at the very start which is the hardest on the way up so you want to go thru that on the way down as controlled and slow as you can. also try first with the reverse grip as it is easier.

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                        • #42
                          Originally posted by dilberryhoundog View Post
                          I've tried most of them, I've settled on YAYOG (you are your own gym). I tried PBF, simplefit, convict conditioning and the naked warrior. I found YAYOG the best because: THE IPHONE APP, 2hrs a week (simplefit and CC just wasn't enough time, less than an hour a week). YAYOG gets a whole lot more muscle groups working in different ways (the others didn't work the legs like yayog does (back lunges, side lunges)). YAYOG is no frills (TNW breathing etc).

                          hope that helps.
                          I just borrowed YAYOG from the library to look through and then realized he has a new book out, geared towards women, called Body By You so I'm heading out tomorrow to buy it and plan on starting on Monday
                          *Sara*

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                          • #43
                            i have just got BBY and i reckon it is really good. i have just worked out which progressions i am on for all the exercises and am gonna start for real tomorrow.

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                            • #44
                              Originally posted by LittleSparrow View Post
                              Since I don't have an access to the gym I do Max Capacity Training. Max Capacity Training - 12 Week Bodyweight Workout Plan look it up!It's a great workout.
                              I started this a few weeks ago and really like it. It gives you a nice mix of exercises and keeps me interested. However, it is missing pullups/chinups, so I do those on the rest days in between.

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                              • #45
                                Hi All,

                                After having tried both You Are Your Own Gym and Convict Conditioning, I would say that they are both great at-home, body-weight programs. It really comes down to what you're looking for in an exercise program.

                                YAYOG provides more of a well-rounded fitness program. I believe the book states that it trains endurance, strength, power, and speed, and it accomplishes that by using a combination of both linear and undulating periodization. Each program lasts ten weeks and is broken down into two weeks of endurance (high rep, easier exercises), two weeks of strength (6-12 rep range, harder exercises), two weeks of power (supersets, lower rep range, explosive/harder exercises), and then four weeks of a combo of all of those in addition to tabata workouts and circuit training. YAYOG also has a TON of variety. Your muscles will definitely be hit from every angle possible. Master level exercises include free standing handstand pushups, one-legged squats, one-arm pushups, hanging leg raises to the bar, and others. If you've never done tabata sprints before, you're in for one hell of a ride.

                                On the other hand, Convict Conditioning is all about strength. Currently, there are two CC books out. The first one focuses on the six basic body-weight exercises: squats, pullups, pushups, hanging leg raises, back bridges, and handstand pushups. The second book focuses on exercises for secondary muscle groups: neck, forearm/hands/grip, and calves.

                                Basically, each exercise is broken out into a ten-step progression series, each step being a slightly harder variation of the exercise before it. Each step also has a number of reps you have to meet before advancing to the next step. It's pretty simple in that you start with the first exercise in each progression and keep working on it until you're ready to move to the next step, and so on and so forth. Ultimately, your long-term goals are to get to the point of doing pistol squats, one-arm pushups (legs together), full hanging leg raises, one-arm pullups, and one-arm handstand pushups.

                                I lean towards using YAYOG because I like to have a well-rounded fitness program. Generally speaking, I think it contains all the primal principals: slow movement (endurance block), heavy lifting (power and strength blocks), and sprinting (tabata and circuit workouts). All you really need to do is supplement it with walking and maybe a primal sprint session if you have the energy. Also, the book is really to the point. You'll be able to get through it in a day and dive in immediately. Convict Conditioning has a ton of story-telling that really isn't needed. I also am not a fan of having to continuously buy books to obtain a complete training system. I read somewhere that a third CC is in development that will focus on explosive training.

                                The other thing is that CC mentions the importance of training explosively, but it isn't included in the program. It's briefly mentioned that it should be done from time to time, but there's not really a lot of instruction on how to integrate it into the core program. That's another reason why I prefer YAYOG.

                                If you do go with CC, make sure you incorporate lots of slow movement and the occasional sprint, as the program is purely focused on strength.

                                Hope this helps!

                                ZZ
                                Last edited by zsz101; 05-08-2013, 04:27 PM.

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