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  • Resistance Training Study

    http://baye.com/wp-content/uploads/2...tr-Fisher1.pdf

    Really good article on resistance training for strength and health. This paper suggests it is more beneficial to train to momentary muscle failure 1-2 times a week with about 80% of 1 rep may weight, than training more often with lighter weights and more frequency.

    http://faculty.css.edu/tboone2/asep/...012_Steele.pdf
    And another study, even heavier on science.
    Last edited by otzi; 02-28-2013, 01:30 PM.

  • #2
    Originally posted by otzi View Post
    http://baye.com/wp-content/uploads/2...tr-Fisher1.pdf

    Really good study on resistance training for strength and health. This paper suggests it is more beneficial to train to momentary muscle failure 1-2 times a week with about 80% of 1 rep may weight, than training more often with lighter weights and more frequency.

    http://faculty.css.edu/tboone2/asep/...012_Steele.pdf
    And another study, even heavier on science.
    Is that actually a study? It just looks like an article.
    The Champagne of Beards

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    • #3
      Originally posted by RichMahogany View Post
      Is that actually a study? It just looks like an article.
      It's an article.

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      • #4
        Interesting article. One of the things I have found confusing is the difference in guidance between lifting protocols, which are primarily around most you can lift for +-8 reps and body weight protocols. For example, primal fitness from Sisson has a progression standard of like 2 sets of 50 knee pushups before going to incline pushups. Convict conditioning also has high reps for most progressions.

        Why the difference?

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        • #5
          Originally posted by OneDeltaTenTango View Post
          Interesting article. One of the things I have found confusing is the difference in guidance between lifting protocols, which are primarily around most you can lift for +-8 reps and body weight protocols. For example, primal fitness from Sisson has a progression standard of like 2 sets of 50 knee pushups before going to incline pushups. Convict conditioning also has high reps for most progressions.

          Why the difference?
          Trained and untrained individuals have very different abilities and needs. Today, I'll be deadlifting slightly over 2x bodyweight for as many reps as possible. Then I'll train Jiu Jitsu tomorrow evening and again on Saturday, after a dynamic effort/explosive workout Saturday morning. This would be highly inappropriate for someone who can only do pushups from their knees for many reasons.
          The Champagne of Beards

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          • #6
            Originally posted by RichMahogany View Post
            Trained and untrained individuals have very different abilities and needs. Today, I'll be deadlifting slightly over 2x bodyweight for as many reps as possible. Then I'll train Jiu Jitsu tomorrow evening and again on Saturday, after a dynamic effort/explosive workout Saturday morning. This would be highly inappropriate for someone who can only do pushups from their knees for many reasons.
            Sure, I see that. But why the difference between most lifting protocols and most bodyweight protocols? For example, Ripptoe doesn,t suggest that you stick to a weight until you can do 2sets of 50 reps and then move to a higher weight. But Sisson says to do 2sets of 50 pushup variants or squat variants before moving to the next difficulty level.

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            • #7
              The barbell is incrementally and, for all intents and purposes, infinitely, loadable. The pushup is not.
              The Champagne of Beards

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              • #8
                Originally posted by OneDeltaTenTango View Post
                Sure, I see that. But why the difference between most lifting protocols and most bodyweight protocols? For example, Ripptoe doesn,t suggest that you stick to a weight until you can do 2sets of 50 reps and then move to a higher weight. But Sisson says to do 2sets of 50 pushup variants or squat variants before moving to the next difficulty level.
                Probably because the jumps are larger. A typical beginner lifting program has the trainee doing 3x5 or 5x5 of a given weight, then increasing 5 pounds. Someone who can only do 5x5 knee pushups is not going to make much progress doing regular pushups, and may not be able to do any close/diamond pushups. By doing higher reps, one can build the strength without overreaching.

                We can debate if the number should be 2x50 or 3x30 or whatever else, but that doesn't change the lack of fine-increment increases in bodyweight training that are so easy with weights.
                Last edited by jfreaksho; 02-28-2013, 05:32 PM.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by OneDeltaTenTango View Post
                  Sure, I see that. But why the difference between most lifting protocols and most bodyweight protocols? For example, Ripptoe doesn,t suggest that you stick to a weight until you can do 2sets of 50 reps and then move to a higher weight. But Sisson says to do 2sets of 50 pushup variants or squat variants before moving to the next difficulty level.
                  There are many different protocols, and many more possible ones that have yet to be written. Are you a woman who wants to do real pushups? Then do them, only as much as you can for a start.

                  Here's how I started again when I was up at 200 pounds. There was no way I could do a complete pushup. I took the position, slowly lowered myself down, tried to push up, and gave up exhausted, usually just once in a workout. I started doing bench press again at the same time. My weight came down as my strength increased, and eventually I reached the point where I got it. Now I am doing 22 pushups and the number is rising fast.

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                  • #10
                    Thanks for those articles. (They are called "review articles" in the scientific literature where an expert considers many other studies.) Intriguing concepts. The physical therapists at my hospital say to do 8-12 reps also. The statement that you only need one set once or twice a week really appeals to the lazy caveman in me, I can tell you; am considering giving his a try.

                    I suspect that Mark's suggestion of loading up to 50 reps could be an injury avoidance strategy (don't do something stupid?). If you go to failure, it's probably good regardless and it's harder to injure yourself with bodyweight than with other methods.
                    10/2/12: 169 lbs, 37"waist
                    Now: low 150's, 33" waist
                    Blog: http://paleopathologist.com/

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