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  • Ladies who lift

    Much to my past self's surprise, I've decided to start lifting. I've reached a plateau in Yoga and want to mix things up a bit. I did some reading about deadlifting and it sounds like an amazing way to build strength. But mainly, I want the bum

    So today I joined the gym! Other than that, I have no idea where to start. What weight free weights should I use initially? What are the best free weight exercises to do (links with pictures)? Are the resistance machines a waste of time? How do I deadlift without killing myself?

    I would also really appreciate if the ladies who lift could share their experiences. What were your goals at the outset? How did you begin and progress? What effect did lifting have on your body composition?

    No bitchy comments please from those who have no tolerance for newbies (you know who you are ).

    ----------

    Btw, just had to share my gym instructor's helpful comment during the compulsory induction when I asked him what the point of the arm bicycle was... "It's cardio... for your arms." LOL.
    "I think the basic anti-aging diet is also the best diet for prevention and treatment of diabetes, scleroderma, and the various "connective tissue diseases." This would emphasize high protein, low unsaturated fats, low iron, and high antioxidant consumption, with a moderate or low starch consumption.

    In practice, this means that a major part of the diet should be milk, cheese, eggs, shellfish, fruits and coconut oil, with vitamin E and salt as the safest supplements."

    - Ray Peat

  • #2
    Fitness level: I do about 4 hours of Yoga a week, cycle / walk for an hour a day, sprint once a week. I can hold a plank for 3 minutes, can do infinite numbers of squats (strong thighs) but can't do a pull up to save my life.
    "I think the basic anti-aging diet is also the best diet for prevention and treatment of diabetes, scleroderma, and the various "connective tissue diseases." This would emphasize high protein, low unsaturated fats, low iron, and high antioxidant consumption, with a moderate or low starch consumption.

    In practice, this means that a major part of the diet should be milk, cheese, eggs, shellfish, fruits and coconut oil, with vitamin E and salt as the safest supplements."

    - Ray Peat

    Comment


    • #3
      I'll have to pay attention to this thread! Most specifically I want to start getting into squating/dead lifting with a barbell, as well as benching. The problem that I run into though is that I'm a little hesitant to start embarking into all of that without having a spotter.

      Comment


      • #4
        if you want to lift weights, i think a progressive barbell program is the best way to go regardless of sex. take a look at starting strength stronglifts. they both focus on big movements, starting light to focus on form, adding weight each workout, and physical strength rather than body building.
        http://www.marksdailyapple.com/forum/thread60178.html

        Comment


        • #5
          Workouts Muffin Topless

          Comment


          • #6
            It might seem expensive, but you might invest in a trainer at your new gym, if only to learn the correct techniques for lifting whatever. It's not as easy as it sounds (!) and you can injure your joints with bad technique...

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by drjoyous View Post
              It might seem expensive, but you might invest in a trainer at your new gym, if only to learn the correct techniques for lifting whatever. It's not as easy as it sounds (!) and you can injure your joints with bad technique...
              I'd advise against this, especially at large commercial gyms. The trainers usually know a smidge more than nothing.

              I would second the suggestion to read Starting Strength by Rippetoe. I wouldn't bother with Stronglifts.

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              • #8
                I agree with barbells machines are just not needed

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by quikky View Post
                  I'd advise against this, especially at large commercial gyms. The trainers usually know a smidge more than nothing.
                  I do not agree with your statement. Certainly there are poor trainers that lack certification and/or a clue, but they can be found anywhere. And the same thing can be said about many industries - there are lawyers and doctors out there without a clue too. If you do the proper research, then you can find a decent trainer. If you know what questions to ask you can certainly find out whether you are speaking with someone who knows what they are talking about.

                  I belong to a commercial gym and have a trainer who is a former power lifter with all the right credentials, education and background. We focus on form and quality - not quantity. I've been with him for over a year now - lost over 40 pounds and have increased my lifts into the advanced/elite categories, never injured - not once. And I come from a background of being chronically overweight and was never an athlete and had never lifted a weight in my entire life.

                  OP: If you are interested in learning how to lift, I would suggest speaking with your gym and finding out whether the trainers there have the proper credentials. Ask about education, certifications (look up which ones are legitimate and which ones are online certifications and learn the difference), ask for testimonials from former/current clients, etc. If you are not impressed, don't hire them. I can tell you from experience that as a woman interested in learning how to weight lift properly -- that hiring a trainer was the best thing I could have done. It helped to boost my confidence in the weight room (a struggling point for most beginning female lifters) and I picked up everything must more quickly than if I had tried to teach myself.

                  If you are more interested in self-teaching (which is also great! Just something I could not have done myself over a year ago) - check out this site: stumptuous.com
                  Lots of great articles, videos and tips can be found there! It's just one of many many resources out there - but this one is specifically written for the ladies.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Start with practicing your form. It doesn't matter if you can deadlift 200lbs if you wreck your back in the process. Pick a few lifts and go light at first until you are sure you are doing them correctly. People who don't know how to do a good air squat, for instance, shouldn't add any weight at all until they get the squat down. Chest up, butt down, weight on the heels, all that.

                    As far as goals, I have a blend of fitness and vanity goals, haha... I want to BE strong, and I also want to LOOK strong. I want that defined, toned look in my upper arms, abs, etc. (Don't worry about looking like a manly bodybuilder with biceps as wide as your head -- you'd have to do steroids to get muscles that big. Another common misconception about strength training for women.)

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Purple Leather Couch View Post
                      I do not agree with your statement. Certainly there are poor trainers that lack certification and/or a clue, but they can be found anywhere. And the same thing can be said about many industries - there are lawyers and doctors out there without a clue too. If you do the proper research, then you can find a decent trainer. If you know what questions to ask you can certainly find out whether you are speaking with someone who knows what they are talking about.
                      Most trainers do not have a clue when it comes to strength training. Finding one that's knowledgeable is hard for anyone, much less for someone who is brand new to lifting. How is the OP supposed to determine who is a good trainer vs who is bad? What exactly would the "proper" search be if the person does not know what constitutes accurate information on the subject of lifting? Doctors and lawyers vary in quality, but their credentials mean a lot more in their respective fields than most personal training certificates. You won't find a heart surgeon who does not know how to properly perform heart surgery. However, you will find plenty of personal trainers that do not know how to squat correctly.

                      If you get the knowledge yourself (hence my recommendation to read Starting Strength), you, if you still choose to do so, can at least have some idea about who is a bad trainer.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by quikky View Post
                        How is the OP supposed to determine who is a good trainer vs who is bad? What exactly would the "proper" search be if the person does not know what constitutes accurate information on the subject of lifting? Doctors and lawyers vary in quality, but their credentials mean a lot more in their respective fields than most personal training certificates.
                        I certainly understand your position. This is why a bit of research is required on the part of the consumer and why I suggested a few things that she should consider when determining whether or not she should hire a trainer from whatever gym she joined.
                        There are varying levels of credentials that a trainer can obtain which can certainly give validity to his/her education and background. Whether or not they are able to answer some pointed questions is part of the process to determine whether or not they are right trainer for you and whether or not they know what they are talking about.

                        I can say with certainty that just because you go into a lawyers office and they are licensed in your state doesn't mean that they know how to . . . .represent you at a child support hearing, for example. Yes they are licensed, and legally they can charge you to represent you - but that doesn't mean they have done it before or will do a good job or even know what the hell is involved in the hearing process. Same thing with a trainer - they can have all the credentials - and they will train you - but that won't guarantee they know anything about lifting -- which is why I suggested that she ask for testimonials from other clients, ask questions - basically my advice was to be an informed consumer (which is what you would do when retaining an attorney - meet with them, ask questions, etc).

                        My advice was to not write off all trainers because they are employed by a gym. That's all I'm saying.
                        Last edited by Purple Leather Couch; 02-13-2013, 04:37 PM.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Ayla2010 View Post
                          machines are just not needed
                          The attraction for a rookie like me is that they seem less likely to kill me

                          Are they effective at all? I used to use them a few years ago and they tightened everything up but the results were shortlived (disappeared as soon as my gym membership did).

                          Originally posted by osgoka01 View Post
                          Thanks for this! Once I figure out how to hold weights I'll be all over that site

                          Originally posted by Purple Leather Couch View Post
                          stumptuous.com
                          Lots of great articles, videos and tips can be found there! It's just one of many many resources out there - but this one is specifically written for the ladies.
                          This is a brilliant resource! Thank you

                          Originally posted by quikky View Post
                          Most trainers do not have a clue when it comes to strength training. Finding one that's knowledgeable is hard for anyone, much less for someone who is brand new to lifting. How is the OP supposed to determine who is a good trainer vs who is bad? What exactly would the "proper" search be if the person does not know what constitutes accurate information on the subject of lifting? Doctors and lawyers vary in quality, but their credentials mean a lot more in their respective fields than most personal training certificates. You won't find a heart surgeon who does not know how to properly perform heart surgery. However, you will find plenty of personal trainers that do not know how to squat correctly.

                          If you get the knowledge yourself (hence my recommendation to read Starting Strength), you, if you still choose to do so, can at least have some idea about who is a bad trainer.
                          Well, the trainer who gave me the induction didn't inspire much confidence ("cardio for your arms"?! Wrote about it at the end of my OP... ) The gym has a bang of CW off it too, so I'm skeptical that I would find a progressive trainer there, but maybe I don't need someone amazing... just someone to show me how to lift without popping blood vessels and vertebrae, right?

                          Will check out that book (ie. try to find a PDF online) - thanks for the recommendation!
                          "I think the basic anti-aging diet is also the best diet for prevention and treatment of diabetes, scleroderma, and the various "connective tissue diseases." This would emphasize high protein, low unsaturated fats, low iron, and high antioxidant consumption, with a moderate or low starch consumption.

                          In practice, this means that a major part of the diet should be milk, cheese, eggs, shellfish, fruits and coconut oil, with vitamin E and salt as the safest supplements."

                          - Ray Peat

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            I totally agree with working on form first. Get a bar or a stick and practice exactly where your feet go, exactly how to hold your back, etc. Watch videos on youtube, visit Stumptuous. I deadlift 95 lbs right now but started at 40. I squat 95 as well. When I can do two sets of 15 comfortably I add another 5 lbs.
                            be the hair that knots with my hair
                            - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
                            primal since oct. 1, 2012

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Totally missed the "arm cardio" comment!! Holy crap - ok, that guy is special. . . just, wow.

                              I just didn't want you to be turned off to the idea of considering one - because for me, it was the best thing I could've done.
                              You seem very knowledgable and much more advanced than I was when I started - so I assumed that you would go in with at least a base line of knowledge to determine whether someone was a hack or not. The fact that you know that "arm cardio" is not a thing already puts you ahead of the generic commercial gym target market. I have no doubt you would be able to determine who was legit and who was blowing smoke up your ass to make a sale.

                              Good luck! And let us know how everything goes!

                              (also, on Facebook (if you are on there) - if you look up Muscle Revolution, this woman posts great, informative lifting articles from a variety of online sources)

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