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Lift Heavy Things - Really?

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  • Lift Heavy Things - Really?

    Hi, I'm new at this and need advice.

    I've been on PB 2.5 months. I was very sick before. Now I'm gaining enough strength and energy to be interested in adding some exercise to my nutrician. So I'm going to start walking slowly, for fairly short distances. I have a cardio machine I can run on when I get to that place.

    I've never done regular, planned exercises and know little about it. I've done the things I loved doing: Competitive swimming and hrose-back riding, jumping, 3-day eventing; running, playing, etc.

    My question is about lifting heavy things. I'm 75 and have osteoperosis, although I'll know in another week if I'm over that now. But I've also shrunk already from 5' 9.75" to 5'8" and I don't want to encourage any more shrinking. I've been told, and understand, that it's not my bones that are shrinking but the discs inbetween the vertabra of my backbone, due simply to gravity. In addition my back is not strong. A great chiropractor has kept it in good shape though.

    It seems to me that if my back muscles were stronger I'd shrink less. But lifting heavy things sounds like it would make it worse.

    Advice?
    "When the search for truth is confused with political advocacy, the pursuit of knowledge is reduced to the quest for power." - Alston Chase

  • #2
    Just start with the movements, no weights. If you are a strong walker, then work on assisted squats and wall-pushups. Mark's fitness plan starts from 0, so following that is a good guideline. Check with a physical therapist who knows your body, perhaps the chiropractor if he/she is legit, to make sure any past injuries or breaks need to be healed before doing certain movements. Some people just lift soup cans at first - I don't know how much muscle you have to gain or how much you regularly lift in normal life, so it's hard to just toss numbers at you. How much do you normally lift, jugs of water, etc., throughout your day?

    But, yes, lifting weights without proper nutrition could make your joints worse. Lifting weights correctly with good bone broth and organ meats should only stop degeneration and rebuild tissues, assuming you are digesting normally, etc.
    Crohn's, doing SCD

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    • #3
      Here are a couple of really good articles on why lifting heavy is good for us older people.
      Starting Strength: Article
      Starting Strength: Article
      Female, 5'3", 50, Max squat: 202.5lbs. Max deadlift: 225 x 3.

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      • #4
        Thank you both. I'll give it a try.

        Do you know of any exercizes to strengthen the back muscles along the spine?
        "When the search for truth is confused with political advocacy, the pursuit of knowledge is reduced to the quest for power." - Alston Chase

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        • #5
          Deadlift does that.
          Female, 5'3", 50, Max squat: 202.5lbs. Max deadlift: 225 x 3.

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          • #6
            Clear it with your doctor but I seem to recall reading about how weightlifting is great for osteoporosis because it strengthens the bones.

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            • #7
              Start SLOW and LIGHT.

              Hire a personal trainer who works with seniors or some sort of physical therapist to get you started and follow thier program. Do you plan on going to a gym or working out at home?

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              • #8
                Well, after this advice, I think I'll go to a gym and work with a trainer.
                "When the search for truth is confused with political advocacy, the pursuit of knowledge is reduced to the quest for power." - Alston Chase

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                • #9
                  well. seem to recall reading about how weightlifting is great for osteoporosis because it strengthens the bones.

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                  • #10
                    Here's a good question to ask yourself:
                    Am I still strong? Or is my strength decreasing?

                    Remember that the principal of "use it or lose it" always applies. This is what makes the difference between folks who stay strong as they age and folks who do not. This is what makes the difference between folks who can't walk up the stairs when they're older and folks who are still active.

                    And this is why weight training is even more important as you age.

                    But I wouldn't try to do too many sessions though. 1-2 heavy sessions per week will be plenty. It's good for you because it makes you stronger. But intense training also taxes your immune system. So for that reason, you have to balance you out. And that's why I wouldn't recommend anymore than 2 heavy workouts per week. On the side, you can do any sort of walking or what ever.

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                    • #11
                      A year ago I began doing something called SimpleFit. The pullup portion of the routine destroyed my elbows and gave me something called golfer's elbow. It's kept me from doing pretty much anything all year until I picked up the book Convict Conditioning. Starting with the four recommended base step exercises and -- as the author recommends -- milking the routine and banking joint and tendon strength for later on, my elbows seem to be gaining strength and healing. So my recommendation is find some basic exercises and milk them for a few months gaining joint and tendon strength before trying to tackle lifting heavy things. There's nothing worse then starting into an exercise routine and thwarting any progress by hurting yourself.

                      The four basic exercises from CC are: Vertical Pulls, Shoulder Stand Squats, Wall Pushups, and Knee Tucks. Three sets of 50 each. Work your way up to that and just milk it.

                      I've also added four other exercises (not from CC): Prone 'Y' on a stability ball, Plank, Side-lying Leg Lift, and Side-Lying Shoulder Rotation. Three sets of planks for two minutes. The others again working up to 50 reps for three sets.

                      I found the last four exercises from from an MDA's Sunday Link Love article, Everything You Know About Fitness Is a Lie.

                      I dug these images out from a suggestion in one of the response's to Mark's Link Love post.





                      Last edited by neowild; 01-31-2013, 09:12 AM.

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                      • #12
                        Convict Conditioning is excellent, although the book can get a little hokey with the stories. Stronglifts 5x5 is an excellent lifting program as well. Both programs start out easy/light, and slowly but steadily progress.

                        I use Convict Conditioning when I am out of town and don't have access to a gym, and I do Stronglifts when I am home.
                        "It's a great life, if you don't weaken.". John Buchan

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                        • #13
                          For many years I did weight training in the gym to strengthen my lower back after breaking a vertebrae in a car crash. The training I did was heavily supervised and started very light, working my way up. Sadly, once the children turned up I stopped weight-training, and have now had to start from square one because of my previous back injury. I am lucky in that I have proper supervision and my aim (and that of my trainer) is to steadily and slowly build strength through weight training (using the machines) over the next 3 - 6 months, then progress to free weights and bodyweight exercises that I can do at home. If you have any back problems at all, make sure that any lifting you do starts light and is well supervised!

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                          • #14
                            Cryptocode,

                            I found this post really inspiring, and I'm in my 30s. I hope I can be like Gene and Loraine in a few decades.

                            What is Weak? | Tucson Kettlebell

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                            • #15
                              What others have said is good. I'm gonna throw out the 5/3/1 program too. The two day template works out perfectly if you want to strictly do it the "primal" way. I do 4 days a week, but I'm a powerlifter so I need more frequency/volume.

                              5/3/1: The Simplest and Most Effective Training System for Raw Strength: Jim Wendler: Amazon.com: Kindle Store
                              KFCialis - It may be boneless...but you won't be! - Stephen Colbert

                              My Powerlifting journal in preparation for my first meet - http://www.marksdailyapple.com/forum/thread54184.html

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