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Get big via body weight training?

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  • #16
    Originally posted by Philosopher Dan View Post

    Coach Wade typically has people practicing an exercise once a week until you get very advanced. Prof. Pavel, though, has people train the same movements many times a week.

    So what you might do is "double-up" the program. Given what you noted, you might double the times you practice each move or more. Do New Blood, but in pairs with a day off in between. So push/HLR day 1, squat/pull day 2, rest day 3, then repeat.
    Good luck!
    Things like doubling up seem great at the beginning of this program but the amount of work you put through the shoulders and elbows can really add up after a couple of months, you already have multiple upper body pushes and pulls and a lot of core work. Remember for muscle growth recovery is king.

    If you do want to add more try a horizontal pull as outlined in CC Super FAQ. I have a dodgy left knee so I can't get a full RoM on that leg so I added in a few KB swings to help give the legs a bit more work. But plenty of rest is important.

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    • #17
      Never gymless by Ross training. I own it and its a great book. I also suggest making a sandbag and getting a weight vest.

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      • #18
        I was just looking at the pictures the OP posted- if that's him on Twitter, then he's like me, with a woefully underdeveloped upper back. I can see it in the posture of your shoulders-- they tend to hang forward a bit, which makes your chest look smaller. The difference in posture/shoulder position between where he is at and where he's trying to be is pretty striking. It's hard to tell, but it looks like you may have a bit of a forward head posture as well- my brother is almost as tall as you, and 4 inches taller than everyone else in the family. He tends to hunch forward to meet people's eyes on their level, something my dad and I both do/did.

        1. Learn how to keep your shoulders back. Stay focused on that, until it is a habit. This will make your chest stick out and look bigger, with no additional changes. Esther Gokhale has a GoogleTalk on youtube that should help.
        2. Start working pullups and horizontal rows. I don't know how many pushups you can do, but your lack of upper back strength indicates your pullups (like mine) are pretty weak. A strong upper back will help keep your shoulder aligned where they ought to be.

        *Note* I'm not a kinesiologist, but that's what I see. Some of these issues that I see may be caused by you flexing in that photo, so don't take me too seriously.

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        • #19
          A lot of it is what you eat, and a lot of it is how you train, but it can be done with bodyweight training. The added benefit compared to artificial weight training is that your strength will explode. You might have to modify primal eating a bit and start drinking more protein shakes and other things like that.

          I'm working through Convict Conditioning right now too and those should get you some significant mass gains, especially once you start getting into the exercises like one-handed handstand push-ups. You might also want to add some weight to those, like a weighted vest, or holding a sandbag during the one-legged squats. Here's a good article that Mark wrote that shows some good tips on how to build more muscle while still staying mostly primal: How to Gain Weight and Build Muscle | Mark's Daily Apple

          It's one of the most popular posts so you've probably seen it already but just in case

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          • #20
            Originally posted by jfreaksho View Post
            I was just looking at the pictures the OP posted- if that's him on Twitter, then he's like me, with a woefully underdeveloped upper back. I can see it in the posture of your shoulders-- they tend to hang forward a bit, which makes your chest look smaller. The difference in posture/shoulder position between where he is at and where he's trying to be is pretty striking. It's hard to tell, but it looks like you may have a bit of a forward head posture as well- my brother is almost as tall as you, and 4 inches taller than everyone else in the family. He tends to hunch forward to meet people's eyes on their level, something my dad and I both do/did.

            1. Learn how to keep your shoulders back. Stay focused on that, until it is a habit. This will make your chest stick out and look bigger, with no additional changes. Esther Gokhale has a GoogleTalk on youtube that should help.
            2. Start working pullups and horizontal rows. I don't know how many pushups you can do, but your lack of upper back strength indicates your pullups (like mine) are pretty weak. A strong upper back will help keep your shoulder aligned where they ought to be.

            *Note* I'm not a kinesiologist, but that's what I see. Some of these issues that I see may be caused by you flexing in that photo, so don't take me too seriously.
            jkfreakshow,

            this post is great, you've really hit the nail on the head my man. I haven't seen the OP's photo, but your description describes me fairly well. I lack mass in my upper back and my bad posture habits have all compounded to leave me with teh description you have there.

            There is an exercise that i think can help. Holding a barbell infront of you, bring your shoulders back without bending the elbows, and try get the two shoulder blades at the back to meet at the centre of your back and achieve a nice squeeze. This should work the upper back muscles and wind the shoulders back.

            This thread has got me thinking of getting the CC book, would this forum recommend it? I'll be buying a few books in next couple weeks, should i include this one in the list?

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            • #21
              I did the first half of Geoff Neupert's Kettlebell Muscle program and it took my tube-like gumby arms and put inordinately satisfying little bumps in them. I know you travel, and irrespective of what kettlebell people say, you can not travel with kettlebells. They are actually disallowed by the TSA as carry-ons, and it irritates one's wife to find this out in real time.

              But, while you're at home, you might try some double kettlebells. They don't take much space, and the workouts are super quick. I can get you a link... Amazon.com: Kettlebell Muscle: The Secrets of Compound Kettlebell Lifting (9780938045779): Geoff Neupert: Books

              I should mention I did it pre-Primal. It's a very high carb diet, and might be tough with just sweet potatoes.

              Didn't Coach Wade promise biceps like melons and a back like a barn door from doing pull-ups?
              Last edited by ionFreeman; 12-18-2012, 10:32 PM. Reason: adding a note

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              • #22
                Originally posted by zizou View Post
                *snip*
                This thread has got me thinking of getting the CC book, would this forum recommend it? I'll be buying a few books in next couple weeks, should i include this one in the list?
                I've had great success with it, though my pullups are far behind my pushups(level 7) and squats (level 10). Bridges and handstand pushups and pullups are all being held back right now by weak upper back and shoulder muscles. I'm still working on it, though not as regularly as I should be.

                I added somewhere around 10 pounds of muscle from the early stages of CC, but I was really skinny then. I've added another 10 pounds after I started lifting weights too, but I think it could be done without the weights.

                I do some grappling on occasion, and I find that I'm able to muscle almost all of the other grapplers except for two or three. I'm beating or staying even with far more experienced guys that I have no business beating, simply because I can muscle them around a bit.

                TLR YES!!! Get it, you won't regret it. Full-body workouts, logical progression, clearly laid out... it's been great for me.

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                • #23
                  I'll second the recommendation for Convict Conditioning. I've been doing it for about 9 months now, and my strength has gone through the roof.
                  "Itís not about how strong you are, itís how well you can move with that strength."

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                  • #24
                    Thanks again for all the responses y'all. I've been spending most of my down time since I posted this thread looking for more information on this. Contrary to what you might believe, there isn't a whole lot of info out there, and what is to be found is mostly conjecture.

                    I believe that I will stick to CC and adjust my eating and see what happens. I've been looking back over my eating and it isn't going to cut it as far as putting on muscle. Thank heavens I found the Primal Blueprint; in the 14 months I've been Primal, I've cut my weight from 230 to 176 and my body fat from 40% to 24%, but eating only when I'm hungry paired with occasional intermittent fasting has cut my calorie consumption way down...gotta eat more to grow (that is the one thing that I have universally found.)

                    I'd love to get a membership to a big gym and start a dedicated hypertrophy program, but it isn't going to happen being on the road 3 and 4 days a week. I'll report back here periodically and let you know if I'm making any significant gains with the increased food consumption and strict CC progressions.

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                    • #25
                      Originally posted by BamaAla View Post
                      I'd love to get a membership to a big gym and start a dedicated hypertrophy program, but it isn't going to happen being on the road 3 and 4 days a week. I'll report back here periodically and let you know if I'm making any significant gains with the increased food consumption and strict CC progressions.
                      I have one possible solution that worked for me.

                      I tried once per week abbreviated HIT workouts. These lend themselves to traveling and flexibility very well. No matter where you are, you can easily go to a local gym and pay $10 for a workout. And even if you don't have a lot of time, the workouts only last 20 minutes so it really isn't that much of a worry.

                      Bear in mind that I gained all of my size in previous years working out 3-4 times per week. But that doesn't mean that it won't work to make you big. I know plenty of guys who got big from working out only twice per week. And based on that and knowing how you can make a workout brutally hard with compound movements and rest-pause sets, I honestly can't think of any reason why it wouldn't work.

                      And it definitely did work for me for my purposes. I was burnt out from previous years of overtraining (from competition in strength sports) and I wanted a way to workout that would minimize the stress, save me time, allow for flexibility, and allow me to get motivated to start training hard again. And it worked!!! I did one 20 minute workout per week to keep my muscles strong, cut calories to lose the weight, and I ended up leaner and in better shape than I had been in over a decade!!!

                      Anyways, its just an option I wanted to throw at you, if you even have access to gyms at all. If you like working out more often, it wouldn't mean you'd have to give up CC either. I never read CC. But my bet is that what ever you are doing you could easily mix it up. For example, you could do two bodyweight workouts per week and one insane HIT workout.

                      Let the truth be told, working out more often is more healthy for you anyways. It elevates your mood, and the more moderate intensity exercise such as walking or what ever actually helps keep your immune system working well.

                      If you end up wanting to try, I'll tell you a few HIT workouts you can try. But don't be fooled when I tell you they are short and infrequent. They are not easy!!! Be prepared to work HARD!!!

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                      • #26
                        Diet and timing are huge. Big carbo post workout meals and tons of meat in between. You can won't get "big" with body weight unless you start doing gymnastics. You need progressive weight resistance over time to gain big muscle. The only progressive thing you can do with body weight is more reps. When reps get beyond 12 it starts to get more into the stamina part of muscles.

                        It also comes into a hormonal thing. You need to get a good strong CNS shock to get the body producing more testosterone. That is why heavy squats and heavy deads are so important for those that search for size. Bodyweight can get you a fantastic physique no doubt. You will look strong as all get out and have physical capabilities of a puma but you won't gain 40lbs of muscle. Took my one year of serious lifting to gain 20 but I am sure that if I went straight body weight I would still be looking really good.

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                        • #27
                          I was skeptical but I did a two month experiment with Simple Fit alternated with repeat steep hill runs and intervals on the track and I was amazed at my improvement. Here is my routine Day 1 - Simple Fit Day 1 routine, Day 2 - Intervals at the track 10 X 100 meters, Day 3 - Simple Fit Day 2 routine, Day 4 - Repeat steep hill runs (1/4 mile) X5, Day 5 - Simple Fit Day 3 routine, Day 6 - Intervals at the track 6 X 200 meters, Day 7 - Rest. Simple Fit is a classic progressive resistance (using increased reps) routine that seems to work. It's very important to do the exercises in a very strict manner.
                          Recent Blog: http://www.peakperformanceradio.net/...y-john-saville

                          https://www.facebook.com/PaleoJourne...?ref=bookmarks

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                          • #28
                            Originally posted by Betorq View Post
                            Rodney Yee was lifting weights & doing gymnastics long time, then semi-professionally many years before he became a yogi. And he eats a LOT of quality food to keep his physique lookin that way & he's young. Also, genetics play a part for sure. But muscle can be built by anyone if the effort, fuel & recovery is there. Whether you're 83 or 38, putting on some bulk is quite doable.
                            He was also a professional ballet dancer, and they do a lot of pilates and many of the men lift weights.

                            Also, I believe both Rodney and Baron Baptiste still lift weights, btu say that they don't.

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                            • #29
                              Look up Bo Jackson and Herschel Walker. Neither lifted weights until after they got into the NFL. Walker would do 500 push ups a day with his girlfriend sitting on his shoulders.
                              ----------
                              Primal since August 2012. CW: 317.

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