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  • #16
    Yeah, I'd go with the PB fitness plan unless you have someone actually training you on how to do squats and deadlifts.

    Or stick to the less "technique" driven lifts. Maybe work on chins, pushup progression, and bodyweight squat progression. Seriously. If you can only do 2 chins and less than 30 pushups I see absolutely no added value in starting weight training.

    Weights are not inherently harmful, but poor form is. Ask Gadsie and many others. I don't care how good a book is you can't learn proper form JUST from it. I tried to teach myself kung fu from a book when I was 10....that didn't work either.

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    • #17
      One can always hire someone to teach form. That's what I did. I hired a personal trainer for a couple sessions to show me the ropes. After I worked out for a month or so, I sent in some form check videos to the SS website and got some additional help.

      And I'm doing weight lifting because I can't do the body weight stuff very effectively. Even after almost a year of bodyweight fitness classes I wasn't gaining very much strength at all. I can't do any pullups or chinups but I can do bench press. I can bench almost 70lbs. I started at 30lbs. I can deadlift more than I weigh and I started with 45lbs. But I can't do a frickin' pullup to save my life so why frustrate myself?
      Female, 5'3", 50, Max squat: 202.5lbs. Max deadlift: 225 x 3.

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      • #18
        And I'm doing weight lifting because I can't do the body weight stuff very effectively. Even after almost a year of bodyweight fitness classes I wasn't gaining very much strength at all. I can't do any pullups or chinups but I can do bench press. I can bench almost 70lbs. I started at 30lbs. I can deadlift more than I weigh and I started with 45lbs. But I can't do a frickin' pullup to save my life so why frustrate myself?
        This was me. I didn't get better at bodyweight stuff until I'd been heavy lifting for a while. I wish I had an exercise science education so I could dissect why.

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        • #19
          Only way to do a pull up or Chin up is to try to do them or reverse them. I weight lifted for months and couldn't do one it wasn't until kept trying and failing to do them every day till I actually managed one. Don't get me wrong I can only do 5 chin ups max, but that's mostly because once I could do them I lost interest.

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          • #20
            In this particular case...very skinny very young girl just starting in strength training.....I like BW work first.

            If we change that to overweight and/or deconditioned then specific weight exercises may be a more suitable method since BW takes on a whole new meaning and some don't lend themselves as well to progressions.

            But thats just very general advice. Personally I will coach my kids (or hire out if they wont listen) on correct technique. I wouldn't stick my kid in a weight room without supervision for at least a couple of months. Learn it right from the start and build on that.
            Last edited by Neckhammer; 01-25-2013, 03:32 PM.

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            • #21
              My $.02: You're young and your body will react favorably to most anything you put it through at this point, so I personally would say don't start sweating details as you go yet, just play with things and see what you enjoy.

              Also, many people work far too much on pushing (bench) and not enough on pull (rows).

              Overhead presses are awesome.

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              • #22
                You could do a push/pull type of routine which would incorporate compound movements to illicit the maximum hormonal response.

                3 sets of 8 for most exercises, and then you would progress by one rep each week. So first week you would do 8 reps and then the second week you'd keep the exact same weight and do 9 reps, then 10, then cap out at 12.

                DAY 1: "Push"

                Bench Press 3x8
                Incline Dumbbell Press 3x8
                Military Press 3x8
                Lateral Raise 3x8
                Tricep Pulldown w/rope 3x8
                One handed tricep extension 3x8

                DAY 2: "Pull"

                Bent-over Barbell Row 3x8
                Dumbbell Row 3x8
                Lat Pulldown 3x8
                Bicep Curl 3x8
                Alternating DB Curl 3x8
                Weighted Crunch 4x8

                DAY 3: Legs

                Rear Barbell Squat 3x8
                Leg Extension 3x8
                Leg Curl 3x8
                Weighted DB Lunges 3x8

                So you're only training 3 days a week. I do this myself and I have my girlfriend do this as well. She is pretty tiny at 5'6 and 120lbs. She handles it just fine and i'm sure that you could as well.

                So I do Push, Day Off, Pull, Day Off, Legs, Day Off, Day off. On your off days you can do some slow cardio such as walking, or you can do your once a week all out sprint exercise. The point of this set-up is that it is very flexible and easy to follow once you get the hang of it. I've left out Deadlifts because I believe that you should only start them once your core strength is up to par. I would advise doing this program for about 4 weeks and then switching either the sequence of the exercises or incorporating different exercises such as replacing the Barbell Row with Deadlifts on pull day.

                I know this workout isn't considered trendy or new-age like crossfit. But it works for muscle growth. I have experienced this myself and my girlfriend has also had great results with it.

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                • #23
                  Aim for at least 1 to 2 grams of protein for every pound of body weight. For example, if you weigh 180 pounds, take in at least 180 to 360 grams—or about 6 to 12 ounces—of protein every day.
                  Last edited by chasefitness; 01-29-2013, 03:57 AM.

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                  • #24
                    "Diet plan" in the book while written for high school age kids it is written for high school age boys. Practical Programming includes chapters on "special needs" like old people and women.

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                    • #25
                      Weight lifting equipments are those that target muscles of the hands and chest. If a patient requires his/her arms to recover after breaking the arm's bones, he/she would be given some weight in order to help them in their recovery. Such equipment is normally designed to consider the patients medical condition in order for them to achieve goals that are realistic and those that are achievable during a certain span of time.

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