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  • #16
    I rarely use creatine when I'm in a calorie surplus - I don't really need it to make strength gains as long as I eat big. However, I find it very useful when I'm cutting weight.

    Diarrhea has been an issue when supplementing with creatine though. Not "explosive" diarrhea, but I definitely shouldn't mix chili con carne and creatine. That would be a lethal combination
    Yeah, my grammar sucks. Deal with it!

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    • #17
      Zilog,
      Thanks for clearing that up. I do believe tho, I am in that advanced group you were talking about. I ve been working out for a very long time and recently I just haven't been making any gains. I've changed stuff up but it doesn't seem to help. Ill try creatine and see what it does. If I gain, hypothetically, 50% more strength on it. And lose 25% of that when I stop the cycle, I am still 25% stronger than what I ever would have been because I am pretty sure for now my body is maxed out.

      Only one way to find out.

      Ps: water intake? I ve been crushing water but I think I am overdoing it as I pee like every 20 mins. May e it's because I just started and my muscles aren't I taking water yet (only been 2 days)

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      • #18
        I did it years ago. It works, that's for certain. It gave me the ability to lift more weight with less rest and definitely helped me gain muscle mass. I even managed to keep it on after I stopped by really hitting it hard as I came off the creatine.

        Make sure you always take it with food though. It ruins your intestinal tract if you don't. Not good times.
        ----------
        Primal since August 2012. CW: 317.

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        • #19
          get the German type creatine mono - Creatine Differences - Best Creatine For Mass and Strength - YouTube
          NotSafe4Work
          SixStringStrength.com

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          • #20
            When I've used creatine I thought it worked. But when I quit using it the gains and my desire to workout hard fell off. To me it's kind of a crutch. I'm leery about using it long term in case it affects kidney health. Because it's metabolized to creatinine, taking the supplement can give a false blood reading of kidney dysfunction.

            Effects of creatine supplementation on r... [J Herb Pharmacother. 2004] - PubMed - NCBI
            Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA., USA.

            Creatine & Creatinine Levels | LIVESTRONG.COM
            Would I be putting a grain-feed cow on a fad diet if I took it out of the feedlot and put it on pasture eating the grass nature intended?

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            • #21
              That says its ok in healthy people. The only reported problem was from some idiot who took 20g a day for 4 weeks.

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              • #22
                Creatine phosphate is important for about a second. That's all. Move along folks.
                F 5 ft 3. HW: 196 lbs. Primal SW (May 2011): 182 lbs (42% BF)... W June '12: 160 lbs (29% BF) (UK size 12, US size 8). GW: ~24% BF - have ditched the scales til I fit into a pair of UK size 10 bootcut jeans. Currently aligning towards 'The Perfect Health Diet' having swapped some fat for potatoes.

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                • #23
                  If you're going to make sweeping statements like that, could you please provide some explanation or cite some sources. Thanks.

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                  • #24
                    I did a write up about why I don't take exercise supplements on my blog a while back. Creatine is one of a few popular supplements that I discussed. The article pretty much echoes a lot of the sentiments already stated here by others, but I figured I might as well share the link anyway.
                    "In theory, theory and practice are the same. In practice, they couldn't be more different."

                    "You can have anything you want, but you can't have everything you want."

                    My blog: http://www.AlKavadlo.com

                    sigpic

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                    • #25
                      Originally posted by Al_Kavadlo View Post
                      I did a write up about why I don't take exercise supplements on my blog a while back. Creatine is one of a few popular supplements that I discussed. The article pretty much echoes a lot of the sentiments already stated here by others, but I figured I might as well share the link anyway.
                      Just wondering where ur getting the info to state that long term creatine use is potentially dangerous? Is this just an opinion? Would it be more accurate to say "long term use is potentially dangerous or potentially not."

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                      • #26
                        Originally posted by Kingofturtles View Post
                        Just wondering where ur getting the info to state that long term creatine use is potentially dangerous? Is this just an opinion? Would it be more accurate to say "long term use is potentially dangerous or potentially not."
                        It would be redundant to say "long term use is potentially dangerous or potentially not." By using the word "potentially" to qualify the word "dangerous" it's implied that the opposite is potentially the case as well.

                        As for the basis of my statement, creatine has only been in use as an exercise supplement since the 90s, so there hasn't been time for sufficient data on long term effects to have been collected and studied.

                        Like I said in the article - if you are curious about supplements, try them for yourself and see how it goes. The only way to truly know anything is to have firsthand experience.
                        "In theory, theory and practice are the same. In practice, they couldn't be more different."

                        "You can have anything you want, but you can't have everything you want."

                        My blog: http://www.AlKavadlo.com

                        sigpic

                        Comment


                        • #27
                          Originally posted by Al_Kavadlo View Post
                          It would be redundant to say "long term use is potentially dangerous or potentially not." By using the word "potentially" to qualify the word "dangerous" it's implied that the opposite is potentially the case as well.

                          As for the basis of my statement, creatine has only been in use as an exercise supplement since the 90s, so there hasn't been time for sufficient data on long term effects to have been collected and studied.

                          Like I said in the article - if you are curious about supplements, try them for yourself and see how it goes. The only way to truly know anything is to have firsthand experience.
                          I understand its redundant, it was more of a joke. My point is that the quote seems like to an uneducated quick reader, it may unintentionally make people think that research is showing negative effects when in reality it hasn't.

                          Maybe something to consider for future blogs

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                          • #28
                            Originally posted by zilog View Post
                            If you're going to make sweeping statements like that, could you please provide some explanation or cite some sources. Thanks.
                            Not a sweeping statement - just a basic biochemical fact.

                            Google it if you're interested.
                            F 5 ft 3. HW: 196 lbs. Primal SW (May 2011): 182 lbs (42% BF)... W June '12: 160 lbs (29% BF) (UK size 12, US size 8). GW: ~24% BF - have ditched the scales til I fit into a pair of UK size 10 bootcut jeans. Currently aligning towards 'The Perfect Health Diet' having swapped some fat for potatoes.

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                            • #29
                              Originally posted by paleo-bunny View Post
                              Creatine phosphate is important for about a second. That's all. Move along folks.
                              About half a minute actually, and storing extra creatine only helps reps as well as enhance the rate of ATP and phosphocreatine resynthesis following intense exercise.

                              Creatine is an amino acid, like the building blocks that make up proteins. Creatine in the form of phosphocreatine (creatine phosphate) is an important store of energy in muscle cells. During intense exercise lasting around half a minute, phosphocreatine is broken down to creatine and phosphate, and the energy released is used to regenerate the primary source of energy, adenosine triphosphate (ATP). Output power drops as phosphocreatine becomes depleted, because ATP cannot be regenerated fast enough to meet the demand of the exercise. It follows that a bigger store of phosphocreatine in muscle should reduce fatigue during sprinting. Extra creatine in the muscle may also increase the rate of regeneration of phosphocreatine following sprints, which should mean less fatigue with repeated bursts of activity in training or in many sport competitions.

                              Typically you can see a 5-15% strength gain. I guess it does SOMETHING.

                              Move along.

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