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Please help a complete and utter novice with strength exercises

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  • #16
    i'm a fan of climbing trees.....

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    • #17
      This website is fantastic for form instruction: http://www.exrx.net/Exercise.html
      "To shed all the illusory rights & hesitations of history demands the economy of some legendary Stone Age--shamans not priests, bards not lords, hunters not police, gatherers of paleolithic laziness, gentle as blood, going naked for a sign or painted as birds, poised on the wave of explicit presence, the clockless nowever." --Hakim Bey, TAZ

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      • #18
        If you are serious about getting strong, barbell training is the most efficient way go about it. Starting Strength by Mark Rippetoe is the best book for novice strength trainees. A lot of savvy people new to strength training realize barbells are the best tool for achieving strength but start off on the stronglifts program. SL is not a terrible program but Starting Strength is simply better. When it comes to strength training barbells are the best tool for the job.

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        • #19
          Originally posted by TaydaTot View Post
          If you are serious about getting strong, barbell training is the most efficient way go about it. Starting Strength by Mark Rippetoe is the best book for novice strength trainees. A lot of savvy people new to strength training realize barbells are the best tool for achieving strength but start off on the stronglifts program. When it comes to strength training barbells are the best tool for the job.

          This simply isn't true. There are many equally effective paths to strength. Ask any good experienced trainer and they will tell you it's not the tool but the program and how you apply it. It's all about progressive resistance and pushing yourself. The tools you decide to use are the least important component of your program. Probably the most important aspect of any program is compliance. Find one you enjoy doing. It's so much easier if you look forward to your workouts.

          bruce b.
          Last edited by bruce.b; 04-04-2010, 05:34 AM.

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          • #20
            Some places to look for basic info...

            I know that many others have responded already with some very good suggestions. I would add these other sources...

            1. "Muscle Logic" by Charles Staley (for a good intro to weight training that builds muscular endurance)
            2. "Weight Training for Dummies" (don't laugh...it is a good intro to weight training if you are unfamiliar with it)
            3. "Combat Conditoning" by Matt Fury (for body weight exercises)
            4. "The Naked Warrior" by Pavel (for body weight exercises)
            5. "Starting Strenght" by Mark Rippetoe and Lon Kilgore (for weight training exercises; simple system but effective. Also, get the latest 2009 edition)


            Train Hard!
            Last edited by Phil-SC; 04-04-2010, 01:45 PM. Reason: spelling

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            • #21
              Originally posted by bruce.b View Post
              This simply isn't true. There are many equally effective paths to strength. Ask any good experienced trainer and they will tell you it's not the tool but the program and how you apply it. It's all about progressive resistance and pushing yourself. The tools you decide to use are the least important component of your program. Probably the most important aspect of any program is compliance. Find one you enjoy doing. It's so much easier if you look forward to your workouts.
              I used the term "efficient". I do not know what you mean by "equally effective" without the explicit mention of viable alternatives. You are right when you say it is the program and progressive resistance that matters the most. But any competently designed strength program realizes the best way to incrementally overload resistance on the compound lifts in the most efficient fashion is with a standard Olympic barbell and calibrated plates. What else is better at facilitating progressive overload than barbells? Medicine balls? Compliance is a given. No one here is saying people will get better at something they don't do. Don't get me wrong, squatting, pressing, and dead-lifting heavy is hard but one of the most intrinsically and extrinsically rewarding things I have ever had the pleasure to learn to love. I want to share my passion and insight of strength training with those who are also so compelled. I would feel sorry for anyone who would not look forward to squatting the equivalent of an NFL lineman for 5 reps with zeal, or experiencing the journey that entails.
              Last edited by TaydaTot; 04-05-2010, 07:05 PM.

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              • #22
                Originally posted by Timothy View Post
                My wife has started doing a very feminine version of shovelglove indoors with a six-pound hammer.
                That's awesome that your wife shovelgloves (its a verb now). The first time I heard about it was actually you posting about your workouts. I was intrigued so I checked out the (hilarious) website and it seems like a great workout! I was intimidated by the sledgehammer but I'm tempted to try the hammer version! I think that I might have to make that my workout tomorrow.

                Now the question is: what do I have in my house that I can swing around like a shovelglove/hammer tomorrow?
                Last edited by lcme; 04-05-2010, 08:08 PM.

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                • #23
                  You might also try some dynamic modified isometrics for strength. Look for a book in martial arts stores, or Amazon, Dynamic Strength (older edition was Dynamic Tension) by Harry Wong. Costs about five bucks, more or less. This is great for strength but don't make it your only form of exercise.
                  Tayatha om bekandze

                  Bekandze maha bekandze

                  Randza samu gate soha

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                  • #24
                    So I went out and bought a sledgehammer... and strained a muscle in my back carrying it in from the car! Hmmm...

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