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  • At a crossroad

    I love climbing, and parkour, and I'm just getting into gymnastic feats like levers an such. So now I'm torn with how to train for all three at once. For climbing, you need endurance and power. For parkour you need power and balance. And for gymnastic skills you need balance and strength. There's some overlap between them, but I can't decide how I want to train. Like, a baseline routine. I was considering convict conditioning, and then modifying it with other exercises, like dips and plyo pushups. What do you all think? Any advice is helpful.

  • #2
    i think if you just do those things, you'll be fine.

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    • #3
      I think you should do barbell training until you are adequately strong, then practice these things later.
      The Champagne of Beards

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      • #4
        I would think the climbing, the parkour and the gymnastics would be training in and of themselves.

        There's a saying in the hiking community that the best way to train to go backpacking is to go backpacking.
        Female, 5'3", 50, Max squat: 202.5lbs. Max deadlift: 225 x 3.

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        • #5
          Train for your specialty, dont beat around the bush and makes thing more complicated than they are. Accept the fact you will absolutely suck at some skills, and kickass at the others. Pick a goal, and train for it.


          Im an avid mountain biker, and a competitive Downhill racer.....I can train at the gym all I want in endurace, bodyweight, and strength movements. Although someone who is not a rocket science would say the the single greatest improvement in riding comes from seat time. It just so happens I do spend time in the gym doing strength based work, and it compliments my specialty. Although, my biggest gains every single year come from actual time on the bike, not gym time.
          Last edited by nojoke; 11-26-2012, 10:46 PM.

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          • #6
            Do what you are doing you will not need anything else.
            Eating primal is not a diet, it is a way of life.
            PS
            Don't forget to play!

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            • #7
              After much deliberation I've broken it down like this:

              Tuesday
              Climbing
              2 rounds of:
              Pull ups: 10
              Ab ups: 5
              Dips: 6
              Dead hang: 1 min
              Squats: 30

              Gymnastics:
              2 rounds of:
              Frog stand: 1 min
              Wall handstand: 1 min

              Thursday
              Parkour:*
              2 rounds of:
              Pull ups: 10
              Dips: 6
              Jump Squats/box jumps: 10
              Plyo pushups: 12
              Broad jumps: 5

              Gymnastics:
              2 round of:
              L-sit: 30 sec
              Waist pushups: 6

              It allows me to work on all three to an extent and give me plenty of time to go out and do what I'm training for.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by sbhikes View Post
                I would think the climbing, the parkour and the gymnastics would be training in and of themselves.

                There's a saying in the hiking community that the best way to train to go backpacking is to go backpacking.
                ...says the lady hiker who's doing Starting Strength-style barbell training
                The Champagne of Beards

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by RichMahogany View Post
                  ...says the lady hiker who's doing Starting Strength-style barbell training
                  I don't think barbell training can prepare you fully for backpacking. There is an element to backpacking you can't get in the gym. There's the uneven surface you must walk on. There's the hours and hours upon endless hours of walking under a load sometimes up hill, sometimes down hill. There's the weather--hot sun, cold mornings, rain, snow, trails overgrown with poison oak or scratchy brush. There's the route-finding aspect which can become a tremendous psychological drain. Dangerous creek crossings, rock scrambling with a pack on, strong or cold wind, knowing how to use your equipment to stay fed and hydrated, knowing how to stay hydrated (you would be surprised how few people actually know how to do this right), knowing how to get adequate sleep with inadequate sleeping equipment, knowing how to stay warm and safe under bad conditions, knowing how to start a fire in the rain etc. Being strong helps, but it can't prepare all the body's tendons and muscles nor can it prepare the mind.
                  Female, 5'3", 50, Max squat: 202.5lbs. Max deadlift: 225 x 3.

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                  • #10
                    I've been dancing for a long time. I wondered how I should tailor my workouts to it, but I learned that the gym is best suited for 1 goal at a time. I've been sticking to very basic heaving weight training and I feel incredibly stronger when I do my dance training. Eventually I can progress and focus on power, but I'll get there later.

                    Balance =/= bosu ball. Balance to me is sport specific and should be practiced when training in your sport. Keep them separate and keep your workout focused.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by sbhikes View Post
                      I don't think barbell training can prepare you fully for backpacking. There is an element to backpacking you can't get in the gym. There's the uneven surface you must walk on. There's the hours and hours upon endless hours of walking under a load sometimes up hill, sometimes down hill. There's the weather--hot sun, cold mornings, rain, snow, trails overgrown with poison oak or scratchy brush. There's the route-finding aspect which can become a tremendous psychological drain. Dangerous creek crossings, rock scrambling with a pack on, strong or cold wind, knowing how to use your equipment to stay fed and hydrated, knowing how to stay hydrated (you would be surprised how few people actually know how to do this right), knowing how to get adequate sleep with inadequate sleeping equipment, knowing how to stay warm and safe under bad conditions, knowing how to start a fire in the rain etc. Being strong helps, but it can't prepare all the body's tendons and muscles nor can it prepare the mind.
                      One of the abilities most lacking in the US military right now is the ability to ruck- hike with a loaded back pack. I know plenty of guys who can run fast and are very strong, but just can't maintain a decent pace under load. It's a hard one to train as well, because there's nothing to do but put in the time with the ruck.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by jfreaksho View Post
                        One of the abilities most lacking in the US military right now is the ability to ruck- hike with a loaded back pack. I know plenty of guys who can run fast and are very strong, but just can't maintain a decent pace under load. It's a hard one to train as well, because there's nothing to do but put in the time with the ruck.
                        There is something to do besides putting in time with the ruck. General strength is certainly not the only adaptation necessary, but it's probably the most helpful. And I agree with sbhikes about the fact that you have to have muscular and mental endurance. But the strength will help more than any other single thing.

                        If these guys are already moderately strong, they'll adapt to the ruck quickly. If they're not, they'll have to get strong either efficiently (weight training) or less efficiently (just doing ruck work).
                        The Champagne of Beards

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