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  • Yesterday sucked weather-wise, but about 9:40PM I was able to go over to the basketball/multi-purpose building on campus and use the dry area underneath the main structure for some sprints. Twenty minutes' worth... didn't count how many I did, and wasn't sure of the length of the sprints, but I had to do something!

    Today was SimpleFit L3D2 -- five rounds of 3 pullups, 10 pushups, 16 squats for time. Total time for these was 5:08.84. Also after that, I threw in some bar dips (a set of 3, and a set of 4; dips don't cooperate with my left shoulder very well) and a couple hanging L-sits. After walking back nearly home, I stopped at the elementary school playground and did some other stuff. Three sets of five 'lever pushups' (as n8tive calls them, I think, based on the videos) with my free hand on a low step (a couple inches off ground), and five sets of 10 jumps. First set was regular jumps up onto a step (about a foot), and the other four were lateral jumps over a bar (right around a foot high).
    Are you a college student, trying to navigate college while being Primal? Do you know any other PB college students on a tight budget? Heck, for that matter, are YOU trying to live Primal on a budget? Enroll at Primal University!

    For after all what is man in nature? A nothing in relation to infinity, all in relation to nothing, a central point between nothing and all and infinitely far from understanding either.
    -- Blaise Pascal

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    • Took it easy today, still recovering from squat workout earlier in the week, flung a few arrows at the target instead.
      You'll never see the light if you're in someone else's shadow, or said another way, life is like a dog sled team, if you're not the lead dog, the scenery never changes

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      • AM
        Ran 11.8 @~7:24 mile/min

        PM
        3x8-10 Bent Over Rows
        3x8-10 Single Dumbbell Rows
        3x8-10 Lat Pulldown
        3x8-10 Cable Rows or Pull-ups
        3x8-10 Bicep Curls
        3x8-10 Hammer Curls

        Comment


        • Originally posted by primal_jessjane View Post
          Totally love the PB fitness book, nothing new though, which isn't necessarily a bad thing...I still have a hard time accepting the fact that the LESS exercise I do, the STRONGER I become... ;-)
          Jess what you have to get your mindset around, is the fact that it isn't the exercise that makes you stronger. It is intense exercise and the recovery period that makes you stronger.

          Repetition improves your skill set. When I was your age and a life guard I swam 1,000 yds. a day as a minimum to keep in shape and keep up the skill set. I was motivated because it was part of the job.

          I don't enjoy exercising as a past time or hobby. I understand that you do. That is ok. What I enjoy is going into the gym once a week and beating last week's records. For me that is a thrill. I know I'm stronger than what I was a week ago. I can kick butt as compared to a year ago.

          By the way... you never did comment on my pictures... am I the "Phantom of the Opera"?

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          • Press 3x5
            115 lbs

            Front Squats 3x3
            135 155 175lbs

            Deadlift
            1x5 225 lbs
            1x3 295 lbs
            3x1 315 lbs
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            • Originally posted by rphlslv View Post
              Press 3x5
              115 lbs

              Front Squats 3x3
              135 155 175lbs

              Deadlift
              1x5 225 lbs
              1x3 295 lbs
              3x1 315 lbs
              I know you enjoy working out often. Have you ever considered taking seven days off and seeing what it does to your numbers?

              Comment


              • Originally posted by Vick View Post
                I know you enjoy working out often. Have you ever considered taking seven days off and seeing what it does to your numbers?
                Yeah, I have... But currently I'm improving a lot so I'll keep that up. Honestly I fear that time off will actually reverse some of that progress.
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                • Wall push-ups X 20
                  kneeling push-ups with exercise ball X 10
                  Squats X 50

                  Comment


                  • @rphlslv

                    Fear is a bitch, It is a double edged sword. Doing what you do is creating improvement through synaptic facilitation. The body improves the nervous system's contact to the muscles to make you stronger without building muscle mass. This is important because more muscle mass requires more food for you to find. (Millions of years of looking for food means the body can't relate to a grocery store.) The body strives for efficiency without increasing muscle mass. Time off will reduce some of your gains.

                    Taking the body to failure shocks the body. If you can't move after exercising even for a minute it means you can't find food, but you potentially become food for a predator to take advantage of. The body instinctively understands that immobility is not a desired position to be in. However when you go to that point you must allow the body to heal and then adapt by growing stronger. Studies show over 80% of the population require 6-7 days before they are ready to train again but when they do they are stronger.

                    That is the basic difference in the training methods. Overtraining occurs when you take the body to failure but you don't give it time to heal. Training but not to failure will improve synaptic facilitation and strength but it will not support long term muscle growth.

                    The body will eventually find a way to reduce the muscle so that it requires less calories to survive.

                    That is why old people lose their mobility. They allow themselves to lose their muscle mass.

                    Long term you need to put muscle mass ahead of strength, then strength will look after itself because you are increasing your muscle mass.

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                    • Help the parents remodel the new house - laying linoleum, hanging drywall, moving stuff around. All day. Parents are on day 2 of PB. Mom, "you know my hip doesn't hurt at all today!" Dad, "hey this stuff tastes good!"
                      If you are new to the PB - please ignore ALL of this stuff, until you've read the book, or at least http://www.marksdailyapple.com/primal-blueprint-101/ and this (personal fave): http://www.archevore.com/get-started/

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                      • Moving, moving, and more moving...

                        Moving day today, so I woke up to a nice ROM session, a cup of coffee, then a quick little "100 Rep Challenge" consisting of (for time):

                        20 push up
                        10 muscle up
                        10 burpee
                        10 pistol (r)
                        10 pistol (l)
                        20 plyo pull ups (clap hands)
                        10 planche dips
                        10 l-sit ring pull-ups

                        Then spent the rest of the day hauling heavy boxes and cases in extremely hot weather. Good times.

                        Comment


                        • Vick, well, in essense it IS the exercise making me stronger... It is the stimulation of resistance training, and then of course resting those muscles for a few days. It is the RECOVERY time that I have a hard time accepting! In my type of training, i.e. not going to failure, I find that two days a week of heavy lifting is sufficient and progressive.

                          And yes... Great progress!!! You can tell your arms a little thicker. I think it all really depends on your goals, though. For instance, as a personal trainer, I wouldn't reccomend this protocol for somebody looking to improve their functional strength and power. I still strongly stand behind focusing on the basic movement patterns: pull-up, push-up, press, squat, deadlift. These necessary movements cannot improve without practice. Have you ever tried a traditional weight lifting day, just doing setsxreps?
                          On a mission to help others master movement, build unbreakable strength, & eat MORE food (can't beat that.) Weekly fitness, health & nutrition articles at indulgentfitness.com.

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                          • Walked around an outdoor outlet mall, to engage in some good old American consumerism to get some stuff for school, for about three hours.
                            Then I took a thirty minute brisk walk when I got home. Now I'm going to exercise my fingers by working on my thesis
                            --
                            Here it is, your moment of zen.

                            It's a no brainer: The journal of the cerebelum

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                            • Originally posted by cerebelumsdayoff View Post
                              Now I'm going to exercise my fingers by working on my thesis
                              sorry to hear, that sounds depressing as hell
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                              ><((((> .`.><((((>.`.><((((>.`.><(( ((>

                              Comment


                              • Originally posted by Vick View Post
                                @rphlslv

                                Fear is a bitch, It is a double edged sword. Doing what you do is creating improvement through synaptic facilitation. The body improves the nervous system's contact to the muscles to make you stronger without building muscle mass. This is important because more muscle mass requires more food for you to find. (Millions of years of looking for food means the body can't relate to a grocery store.) The body strives for efficiency without increasing muscle mass. Time off will reduce some of your gains.

                                Taking the body to failure shocks the body. If you can't move after exercising even for a minute it means you can't find food, but you potentially become food for a predator to take advantage of. The body instinctively understands that immobility is not a desired position to be in. However when you go to that point you must allow the body to heal and then adapt by growing stronger. Studies show over 80% of the population require 6-7 days before they are ready to train again but when they do they are stronger.

                                That is the basic difference in the training methods. Overtraining occurs when you take the body to failure but you don't give it time to heal. Training but not to failure will improve synaptic facilitation and strength but it will not support long term muscle growth.

                                The body will eventually find a way to reduce the muscle so that it requires less calories to survive.

                                That is why old people lose their mobility. They allow themselves to lose their muscle mass.

                                Long term you need to put muscle mass ahead of strength, then strength will look after itself because you are increasing your muscle mass.
                                This is already working great for me, but thanks for the suggestion.
                                .`.><((((> .`.><((((>.`.><((((>.`.><(( ((>
                                ><((((> .`.><((((>.`.><((((>.`.><(( ((>

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