Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

can you improve running endurance without "chronic cardio"??

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • can you improve running endurance without "chronic cardio"??

    i usually do 1-2 ten minute sprint sessions each week, and a lot of walking, but i can not run far at all. my national guard recruiter told me to start out slowly jogging a half mile, 3 times per week to start with and build my way up to 3/4 miles and so on. i'm going to have to do so much running in my future, so does it matter if i start doing it right now??

  • #2
    Just go running dude.

    http://www.marksdailyapple.com/forum/thread69809.html

    then read about about how sprinting improves endurace and how to start running.

    And FFS you are joining the forces and you are worried about choronic cardio :rolls eyes:
    You know all those pictures of Adam and Eve where they have belly button? Think about it..................... take as long as you need........................

    Comment


    • #3
      Didn't I already answer this question?
      "Go For Broke"
      Fat Kine-230/24% @ 6'2"
      Small Kine-168/9%
      Now- 200/8%
      Goal- 210/6%

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by Wanderlust View Post
        Try to run 3x a week. Sprints 1x, Medium distance 1x (2 miles) and long distance 1x (4-5 miles).
        Just work on over all muscular fitness, not just push ups. Weights are fine.
        There it is, yes that says you need to run a 4 mile run at least once a week.
        "Go For Broke"
        Fat Kine-230/24% @ 6'2"
        Small Kine-168/9%
        Now- 200/8%
        Goal- 210/6%

        Comment


        • #5
          In one ear and out the other
          You know all those pictures of Adam and Eve where they have belly button? Think about it..................... take as long as you need........................

          Comment


          • #6
            I used to Crossfit alot (dont anymore) had awesome conditioning, but HATED running, I have never been good at it, or should I say not efficient, even in my youth and playing high school sports. Avoided it all cost and honestly we just dont run alot here in the winter here in Alaska.

            If there was a running element in a workout it was usually replaced with a c2 Rower. I'm in the military and it requires running unfortunately.

            With that being said the only way I ever got better at running was to dedicate some extra time to it, and train for my specific goals which are a 1.5 mile AirForce PT test. Outside of the military I dont run, plain and simple. I started running, and within 2 months went from a 14 min 1.5mile time, to 10:38 1.5 mile time. I did this utilizing sprints, 400m sprint 400m jog, etc.....build your way up.

            I guess what Im trying to say is that metabolic conditioning will increase your endurance levels to an extent. However, the only correct way to get good at something is to train in that element. Nothing is easy, if your wanting to be good at something, DO IT.

            Comment


            • #7
              thanks guys. and yes, tribal rob, is right, that happens to me too often haha great tips, all of you!

              Comment


              • #8
                Wanderlust has wisdom.

                Comment


                • #9
                  I've found that doing CrossFit-style workouts -- i.e. ones that get my heartrate up to what it would be if I was running (not sprinting, running) seem to help, but YMMV. I had to take some time off from running due to a sprained ankle, but I did what I could (air squats, bicycle, etc) during those 3-4 weeks and I haven't had any setbacks.
                  Subduction leads to orogeny

                  My blog that I don't update as often as I should: http://primalclimber.blogspot.com/

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by AmyMac703 View Post
                    I've found that doing CrossFit-style workouts -- i.e. ones that get my heartrate up to what it would be if I was running (not sprinting, running) seem to help, but YMMV. I had to take some time off from running due to a sprained ankle, but I did what I could (air squats, bicycle, etc) during those 3-4 weeks and I haven't had any setbacks.
                    The problem with that, is it doesn't teach someone to run. Especially someone who has never really ran before. It's great conditioning, but it's not running. He needs specific training vs general training.
                    "Go For Broke"
                    Fat Kine-230/24% @ 6'2"
                    Small Kine-168/9%
                    Now- 200/8%
                    Goal- 210/6%

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by jfreaksho View Post
                      Wanderlust has wisdom.
                      Mostly just experience, learned the painful way =)
                      "Go For Broke"
                      Fat Kine-230/24% @ 6'2"
                      Small Kine-168/9%
                      Now- 200/8%
                      Goal- 210/6%

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        But aren't the "best" "leasons" usually the most painful ones? They certainly the ones you rember the longest!

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Go get Phil Maffetone's Big Book of Endurance Training and Racing.
                          The Big Book of Endurance Training and Racing: Philip Maffetone, Mark Allen: 9781616080655: Amazon.com: Books
                          Female, 5'3", 50, Max squat: 202.5lbs. Max deadlift: 225 x 3.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            There's also a Jeff Galloway running plan here that someone recommended to me as I am also new to running.

                            Jeff Galloway's 5k Training & 10k Training Programs for all levels including beginners

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Not scientific but I think people who say they hate to run or can't do it usually just can't get over the hump of getting to a regular breathing pattern. They start out way too fast and the heart starts pumping and they are sucking in air like crazy and it just feels uncomfortable. If you start out SLOWLY enough and alternate walking and jogging you get to know how it feels and when it happens that your breathing and heart rate kinda level out and then you can just coast along. I guess I would call it the warm up period? I know that sounds ridiculously basic but... Just throwing it out there.
                              Breathe. Move forward.

                              I just eat what I want...

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X