Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Upping the Ante

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Upping the Ante

    Because I have no gym membership, and only a pair of adjustable dumbbells(up to 20lbs each or 30lbs on one), I only do bodyweight. I'm following PBF right now on a Tuesday/Saturday LHT and Thursday Sprint. What I want to do now is start working on the beastlier bodyweight skills, like the planche, the levers, handstands push ups and the like. I already know where to start my progressions, it's just a question of when. Should I add them onto the ends of my workout as a supplementary action, or could I work them on my "rest" days? Advice? Thank you.

  • #2
    If you are far enough along in your PBF then I would add a third working day in your rotation.
    Eating primal is not a diet, it is a way of life.
    PS
    Don't forget to play!

    Comment


    • #3
      i like doing most of these things on non lifting and sprint days, but there are some movements that i'll try to tack on to a pbf workout (like handstand push ups, since they were originally part of the program). i wouldn't go out of the way scheduling a time to work on these. if you're feeling good and warm after a lot of moving slowly and want to bang out some planche or lever progressions, go for it.
      there is a terrific warrior pdf that shows these progressions. i don't have it on my work computer, and i can't remember the source, but those progressions are pretty important to follow rather than just jumping into the exercise. see if you can find some to follow online. al kavadlo may be able to help you out there.
      http://www.marksdailyapple.com/forum/thread60178.html

      Comment


      • #4
        Start picking something and "cash out" with a skill at the end of your workout you either suck at or want to improve on. The quicker and smarter you attack the skill the easier. Easy as that!!!

        Comment


        • #5
          Also, in terms of strength gains and nervous system taxation, should I add a third round to my workouts? Currently I just two two rounds of pullups, pushups, planks and Squats at whatever level I've progressed to. A third round could up the intensity and speed my gains, no?

          Comment


          • #6
            i do a third round of anything i want to work on. if i felt like my pull ups were lacking, or a few levels behind another exercise, i would add on a third round. it's definitely good for taxation, and i also think it's good to focus closely on correct form. i'm not sure if it helped speed up my strength gains, but sometimes that extra focus was what i needed to bust through to a new level.
            http://www.marksdailyapple.com/forum/thread60178.html

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by TheTeddy View Post
              Because I have no gym membership, and only a pair of adjustable dumbbells(up to 20lbs each or 30lbs on one), I only do bodyweight. I'm following PBF right now on a Tuesday/Saturday LHT and Thursday Sprint. What I want to do now is start working on the beastlier bodyweight skills, like the planche, the levers, handstands push ups and the like. I already know where to start my progressions, it's just a question of when. Should I add them onto the ends of my workout as a supplementary action, or could I work them on my "rest" days? Advice? Thank you.
              Check out the book "Building the Gymnastic Body" an excellent source for non gymnast wanting to improve basic gymnastic skills. The broad recommendation is to perform statics before dynamics. i.e. Upper body pushing- planche training followed by push up variations, upper body pull- front lever followed by pull ups.

              I'd get the book if you are really interested in this kind of training.

              Comment


              • #8
                Also check out Al Kavadlo's blog and instructional videos on bodyweight moves like levers and planches--really helpful.

                Comment


                • #9
                  I tend to put the more difficult skills towards the beginning of the workout, especially with balance stuff. I don't like to be overly fatigued and trying to do handstands or pistol squats, as my technique goes to hell. Do a warm-up, then do your skills, then strength.

                  Unless of course, building strength is more important than those skills, in which case do the strength training first.

                  Another option for skills is a grease-the-groove approach, where you do small sets of a skill throughout the day- just a few reps, or a few seconds of a hold. Don't ever go to failure, but do these frequently. This shouldn't affect any of your other workouts significantly. If they do, back off on them.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I would add a third working day in your rotation

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by jfreaksho View Post
                      I tend to put the more difficult skills towards the beginning of the workout, especially with balance stuff. I don't like to be overly fatigued and trying to do handstands or pistol squats, as my technique goes to hell. Do a warm-up, then do your skills, then strength.

                      Unless of course, building strength is more important than those skills, in which case do the strength training first.

                      Another option for skills is a grease-the-groove approach, where you do small sets of a skill throughout the day- just a few reps, or a few seconds of a hold. Don't ever go to failure, but do these frequently. This shouldn't affect any of your other workouts significantly. If they do, back off on them.
                      +1
                      exactly

                      Comment

                      Working...
                      X