Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

chin ups for women

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #16
    Originally posted by EmeraldRose View Post
    Al, I'll just mention here that you've been an inspiration for me! I've watched several of the videos on your website, and my husband and I intend to get your book when we have the cash.
    Thanks!
    "In theory, theory and practice are the same. In practice, they couldn't be more different."

    "You can have anything you want, but you can't have everything you want."

    My blog: http://www.AlKavadlo.com

    sigpic

    Comment


    • #17
      Took me about 6 months to do one chin-up, I can do 5 in a row now. I'm fairly heavy for my height, tho - 5'5" and 145 lbs. I just used bands and progressed to thinner and thinner bands. I do Crossfit, so there'd always be workouts that had high-volume pull-ups or chin-ups, as well as low-volume (for which I'd use as little assistance as possible to build up strength). Plus we do a lot of other strength stuff that helps develop all the muscles involved in doing a chin-up or a pull-up, so kind of like cross-training, I guess.
      And yeah, the assisted pull-up machine is strange, it's not a natural movement, so I wouldn't recommend it for training. Get a circular resistance band instead.

      Comment


      • #18
        i will look for a resistance band at the gym. it doesnt have one of those assisted pull up machines. my last gym did and it was just wierd. how often, in terms of times per week , did you try to do a pull up over the 6 months? the only woman i have seen irl do one btw used wrist straps to strap her wrists to the bar so i was thinking about doing some grip improving exercises as well.

        Comment


        • #19
          There is a company called Iron Woody's that makes something called, appropriately enough, Woody Bands which are very helpful. You can order them on the net. I'm working my way through the series. Not there yet but still at it.

          Comment


          • #20
            i'm not in the US so the postage would kill that. i will look them up to see what they are like and see if i can find an equivalent here.

            Comment


            • #21
              Originally posted by Owly View Post
              Oh, and the other part of it. If you are losing weight as you are learning, you will hit a tipping point where your increasing strength and decreasing weight converge. Once this happened, it was like magic for me. Some people wait until they lose weight to start learning, but I think the strength gains I made by doing the progression at a heavier weight made a huge difference for me in the long run.
              This is what I figure... once I've lost 15kg more, I should easily have the strength to do a pull up or chin up or whatever, especially if I keep building muscle in the meantime (and I may get there before I've lost all the weight too ). Lighter women (and men probably) do generally have an easier time of it, all else being equal, simply because they have less weight to lift (as shown by our CrossFit instructor this morning who was having a bit of a gloat as he can do stuff the other instructor can't... probably as he's a small/lean guy and the other guy is big and beefy, and while he'd have greater overall strength, easily... just finds certain things harder because of his size).

              Comment


              • #22
                Originally posted by Goldie View Post
                A pullup (palms away from you) uses the lats more, a chin up (palms towards you) uses the biceps more. Chinups are generally easier than pullups for most people.
                What is it when the palms are facing your ears? I use the moveable monkey bars at school (probably not called monkey bars, cos they're not fixed like a ladder. They can twist in their socket) and end up (sometimes) with palms facing ears. Other times it is a chin up (thanks for the clarification )

                Comment


                • #23
                  I found kettlebell training helps a lot to build core strength. I'm a 30yo male, 200lbs, and was never able to do a single chin up in my life. After a few months of kettlebell training I can now do 6 chin ups in a row quite easily. Still not great but it's progress and doing the actual chin ups on a regular basis will help as well, I suppose. Target is 20 in a row.

                  Comment


                  • #24
                    Originally posted by Bron View Post
                    What is it when the palms are facing your ears? I use the moveable monkey bars at school (probably not called monkey bars, cos they're not fixed like a ladder. They can twist in their socket) and end up (sometimes) with palms facing ears. Other times it is a chin up (thanks for the clarification )
                    No special name for those AFAIK, just "modified pullup" !!

                    Comment


                    • #25
                      Originally posted by Goldie View Post
                      No special name for those AFAIK, just "modified pullup" !!
                      There actually is a name for this type of pull-up. It's called a "neutral grip" pull-up. But yeah you can just call all of them a pull-up and that's cool too.

                      I mentioned the neutral grip pull-up in this guest post I did for MDA on the importance of pull-up bar training.
                      "In theory, theory and practice are the same. In practice, they couldn't be more different."

                      "You can have anything you want, but you can't have everything you want."

                      My blog: http://www.AlKavadlo.com

                      sigpic

                      Comment


                      • #26
                        I started a while back with p90x (doing only the strength workouts), but I found that my pull-ups/chin-ups didn't improve that much. I think it focused too much on high reps and getting there by any means (lots of assistance, but no focus on getting rid of the assistance). After a few months with p90x, I still was no where near getting rid of the chair to help me up.

                        Then I started barbell training + pull-ups/chin-ups. I got rid of the chair and basically started by doing negatives. I started doing 3 sets of 5. Pretty soon I was able to add reps. Then I was able to pull myself up and do like 5 pull-ups, but still touched down after each rep. Then I could do 3 sets of 10. Now I can do at least 8 chin-ups without touching down, but not coming all the way down to hanging. I've stopped adding reps now and I'm working on being able to hang all the way down between reps and then I think I'll work on being able to do the same with pull-ups. I didn't really look into the best way to work up to doing pull-ups before I started, I just knew that the p90x approach didn't do it for me. This way kind of just made sense and seems to be working for me. Each time I work out I try to do just a little more, come down a little lower, hang on a little longer, etc. I've been doing this about 3 times a week since June I think.

                        (It's also super motivating to keep working out. I have a bad habit of working out really well for months and then doing nothing for months, but I would hate to have to start back up from scratch on my pull-ups and chin-ups.)

                        Comment


                        • #27
                          I mentioned the neutral grip pull-up in this guest post I did for MDA on the importance of pull-up bar training.
                          awesome article. i went to the gym. did the hang at the top of the bar with my chin over the top and remembered after 10 secs about my rotator cuff which i had been ignoring as it had almost gone away. so back down on the ground for me till it stops hurting which is very annoying.

                          Comment

                          Working...
                          X