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  • #46
    Thanks guys. I loved the first session and am ready to hit it hard tomorrow. I know its personal choice so Im going to shoot for 8 seconds positive and 8 seconds negative and around 90seconds. 6 reps giving me 96 seconds.

    Ill go with that and see how it feels.

    Smooth all the way, no pause or bouncing.

    Richard
    It isn't the mountains ahead that wear you out....Its the grain of sand in your shoe.

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    • #47
      Originally posted by Richardmac View Post
      I loved the first session and am ready to hit it hard tomorrow. I know its personal choice so Im going to shoot for 8 seconds positive and 8 seconds negative and around 90seconds. 6 reps giving me 96 seconds.

      Ill go with that and see how it feels.

      Smooth all the way, no pause or bouncing.
      If your'e able to manage 6 reps for 96 seconds, smooooth, you will probably need to up the weight. As I said, mine goes up when I hit 7 reps at about 6 seconds each way.

      Definitely go with how it feels to you. Don't forget that your recovery time may will not be the same as many other people's. Mine's definitely more than five days, and I'm beginning to suspect it might be more than seven.
      Why use a sledge hammer to crack a nut when a steam roller is even more effective, and, is fun to drive.

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      • #48
        Hey guys, just checking in. Third session completed this morning. Great improvements, on rows I went from 75 seconds last time to 102 seconds this time.

        I'm shooting for 90 seconds before I up the weight, nothing has fallen below 65 seconds yet.

        I hear what your saying Nigel, but today I honestly stopped counting reps on a couple of occassions. That might not be the right thing to do, but I was focused on rep speed and quality reps and forgot how many id done (though obviously I can figure it out knowing how long the set went on for).

        For chest today I fought hard (I could feel every fiber shaking from about rep 2). I got to the point were I hit the wall and spent about 5-10 seconds trying to fight through it before I failed.

        Here's a question (seems daft asking for help, I train other people, but know very little about HIT methods), you guys stick with the same movements and when your progress slows you take more rest days between sessions. Have you ever thought of switching movements instead? Or maybe even alternating back and forth between two different exercises for each body part?

        Also, I assume u don't add in any arm work at all?

        I'm not looking to change anything, just curious. I am sure the book will answer this, its on its way.

        Richard
        It isn't the mountains ahead that wear you out....Its the grain of sand in your shoe.

        Comment


        • #49
          Originally posted by Richardmac View Post
          I hear what your saying Nigel, but today I honestly stopped counting reps on a couple of occassions. That might not be the right thing to do, but I was focused on rep speed and quality reps and forgot how many id done (though obviously I can figure it out knowing how long the set went on for).

          Here's a question (seems daft asking for help, I train other people, but know very little about HIT methods), you guys stick with the same movements and when your progress slows you take more rest days between sessions. Have you ever thought of switching movements instead? Or maybe even alternating back and forth between two different exercises for each body part?
          Counting reps while concentrating on the timing and breathing was hard for me.

          When progress slows or stops it could be for at least a couple of reasons. One is that you are over training, another is you just may not be in the mood and a third is you are getting close to your maximum. I had a couple of weeks where I didn't shift with pull downs. Then, I started doing pull downs first and we got movement but seated row slowed up. I have heard of people who split the Big Five over two weeks. Progress may then slow up but one should almost never over train. I have never been bothered about the speed of my progress just so long as I do improve eventually. Having said that, I am now moving on to body weight exercise with You Are Your Own Gym. I worked out that the time I spend walking to the gym, chatting to people and doing my workout meant that I could be at home working out four or five times a week, in the dry if it is raining. I still get low level exercise as I walk a mile or so in to town every week day to get the shopping and carry it home in a rucksack.
          Why use a sledge hammer to crack a nut when a steam roller is even more effective, and, is fun to drive.

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          • #50
            Bbs

            Been doing BBS for a few months now. Generally like it-- no injuries, feels amazing, completely exhausted afterwards.

            However, definitely don't make "progress" the way I used to using "normal?" lifiting protocols.

            A difference of a few seconds of TUL can make a HUGE difference in the workout, and it's tough to measure accurately without a partner w/ a stopwatch.

            It's taken a fair bit for me not to find that extremely frustrating, and I'm not quite there yet.

            Also notice rather significant differences depending on carb levels and other extrinsic factors that didn't normally affect my workouts all that much.

            Makes sense, it's longer periods of hard work (and maybe longer periods of harder work). But it's still really hard to wrap my brain around.

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            • #51
              I've been doing a BBS type of lifting since the late 70's. This approach to lifting originated with Nautilus. Mike Mentzer brought a free weight and machine approach to it. When Mentzer quite competing and when to personal training he tracked his trainees progress. Some of them were making progress and he wondered why. Making muscle gains (no matter the system) comes down to managing muscle stimulation to grow, nutrition, and rest to allow the development to take happen. In his personal training Mentzer could see his trainees were working as hard as he thought they should and they tracked their nutrition so he reasoned they weren't resting enough between sessions. So he began increasing the amount of time between lifting sessions until his hard gainer trainees making progress. McGuff in BBS takes the same approach and makes the same analogy I've used for years: Treat strength training the same a getting a flu shot. A flu shot introduces a specific stress into the body which then takes it two weeks to fully adapt that stress.

              I'm not the big on counting reps and time. I keep it to a general rule and go by feel and asking myself questions: "Does the weight I'm lifting feel like the right amount?" If it's a little too heavy I might do breakdowns. "Is the time range per set about right?" I want time under tension to be at least 1 minute but I'm not too picky about time after that. And most importantly, "Do I feel like I'm stimulating the response I'm looking for?"

              While I'm keen to give myself enough rest to allow for development, I'm not that keen on not touch a weight within as set number of days. For example: If you are giving yourself 7-10 days off for rest, I don't see any problem in doing a full-body compound weight session on day 1 (the BBS Big 5) and then come back the next day to do another weight workout. Day 2 might be isolation exercises to round out the previous days session. Then take off the next 7-10 days from weights.

              But even with this type of training protocol, because the body adapts to specific stress, if you want to continue to make gains you still have to block your train year. So part of the year you might want to do a P90X type of training. Point is you still have to mix up the training year with lighter training block, higher volume blocks, etc. If someone is interested in reaching a higher level of fitness they'll have to spend some time deliberately overreaching for a few weeks to a month from time to time and then give the body time to recover before starting a new block.
              Would I be putting a grain-feed cow on a fad diet if I took it out of the feedlot and put it on pasture eating the grass nature intended?

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              • #52
                Interesting Scott. So u have worked all out on say day 1 with compounds and then worked all out on day 2 with isolation, then rested 7-10 days? Any exercise in betwen that time (cardio - long, interval etc)?

                Until I stall I am trying out week one: Bbs day 1, bike/swim/row day 3, bbs day 5. Week two: bike/swim/row day 1, bbs day 3, bike/swim/row day 5.

                Richard
                It isn't the mountains ahead that wear you out....Its the grain of sand in your shoe.

                Comment


                • #53
                  That's generally how I'm working out right now. Later in the year I might switch to something like P90X for a while. Over the years I've turned to more of an instinctive approach to working out. Instead of a ridge schedule I ask myself if I could go all out on a particular day. This week I did isolation on Monday and just finished a BBS typed of workout today (Wednesday) because yesterday I was busy and strained my back a little the night before moving furniture. Today I did 8 different exercises for a full body workout. I won't hit the weights again until maybe next Wednesday. In between those days I'll put in walks and maybe some wind sprints.

                  I began bodybuilding at age 19. I'm now 55. I'm not as lean as Mark (~12-14% bf) but at 206lbs I carry more muscle. IMO people spend too much time working out and not enough time working smarter. I have a 56 yr old friend who like to run fun runs and does pretty well in his age group. Other ask him how he trains and are confused to find he only runs about twice per week.

                  The problem with trying to mix much cardio and muscle building is that you can't do both real well at the same time. Joel Jamieson 8 Weeks Out believes it send a mixed signal to our genes in that one tends to cancel out the other. From personal experience I have to go along with that. I've never been about to do both at the same time. Mostly, I just increased my cortisol levels.
                  Would I be putting a grain-feed cow on a fad diet if I took it out of the feedlot and put it on pasture eating the grass nature intended?

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