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For those that have tried and stopped CrossFit - What Else Did you Do?

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  • #16
    Originally posted by mark2741 View Post
    To clarify -
    They total workout time is usually a minimum of 45 minutes. If that ain't "chronic cardio" then I don't know what is.
    Seriously? 45 minutes doesn't come remotely close to "chronic cardio." You could jog at a steady state for 45 minutes and it's not chronic cardio. My lifting in the gym takes about 45 minutes to an hour and it's not chronic cardio (in fact, it's not cardio at all). PB isn't an excuse for laziness. Exercising can take an hour and it's fine. What Mark decries is extended periods of steady state cardio where you keep your heart rate above 85% of max. A slow jog for 45 minutes (assuming you're reasonably in shape) isn't chronic cardio. And Crossfit is anything but steady state. If anything, it's intervals, maybe some sprinting, etc.

    That said, to answer your original question: Starting Strength. Work that for a few months until you have decent strength, then go from there.

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    • #17
      I'm off CF right now because of costs. I had an awesome gym with good coaches, a serious lifting focus, and varied programming that wasn't all longmetcons all the time, but I'm too broke right now. Over the summer I've done a lot of bodyweight work and running, but with winter looming I need an indoor option, so I'm getting a pass to the city facilities that includes the gyms (which are well equipped), pools, and drop in classes such as yoga. For about $50/month, it's more affordable by far, but I need to decide what to do for programming.

      I love CF, but right now we just can't swing the $300 per month we were spending for the two of us to go. At least my guy makes a good workout buddy. I'm thinking that Starting Strength might be a good way to go, combined with some interval work and swimming.
      “If I didn't define myself for myself, I would be crunched into other people's fantasies for me and eaten alive.” --Audre Lorde

      Owly's Journal

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      • #18
        Originally posted by mark2741 View Post
        ... this year decided to 'become an athlete' : )
        Have you considered going with a standard gym and adding on personal training? The cost may work out to be about the same, and you won't have the competitive/group pressure problem. I've never done CrossFit for just that reason, I know I'd end up hurting myself trying to push myself further than I'm ready to go. So instead I work out 2x/week with a personal trainer (in a mega-gym, LA Fitness) who understands and is excellent with the dynamic, varied, intense sort of workouts that CF does, but tailors them to me specifically. I've been working out with a trainer for years, so clearly I know the exercises and fundamentals by now, but I need the extra push of someone else, just not a lot of someone elses to compete with.

        I've found that if you tell a good trainer that you want to become an athlete (or bring back the one you used to be), and then show them that by working your tail off and really pushing yourself (ask for more weight if you need to, or more intensity, or whatever to show that you're engaged in the process) in the first few sessions, you rapidly become a preferred client.
        My Primal Journal

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        • #19
          I did CF for a little while, and stopped for many of the same reasons. I think I would've loved it 10 years ago, but it's just a bit more intense than I want at this point in my life, and scheduling is hard for me. It turns out I had basically been doing CF on my own for years before I knew what it was.

          Now I mix up my workouts a lot more than I used to. I'll lift heavy a couple days a week (different muscle groups), but often work in some pretty intense circuits using lots of varied exercises. I do a mix of bodyweight, heavy weights, and lighter weights, and add in some short/quick runs, jumps, etc. Deadlift and squat at least once a week. I'm a former gymnast (and still coach), so I have the bodyweight thing down pretty well. I've started using kettlebells/ropes, etc more often lately, and I went for a swim today when I had some free time. I just like doing different things often now instead of the chronic heavy repetitive lifting I did for a long time before. And I haven't lost any muscle (I think I look beefier with my shirt off now, actually).

          The bottom line is find what works for you. Take what you like about CF, incorporate it into what you do, and experiment with everything else. I've been doing serious workouts since I was like 8 years old (32 now), and I've changed things up so many times over the years. I'm really comfortable where I am now. I can do push ups and pull ups until I get bored, am putting up substantially more iron in the weight room than most people much larger than me, and keep my workouts varied enough that it's not a chore to go any more. I'm a member at 24 Hour Fitness, and they have good drop-in yoga classes, outdoor boot camps, etc that I like to hit sometimes for variety, and I'm only paying like 25 bucks a month.

          Working out is a journey, and you'll find what challenges you and keeps you motivated. And strong. And looking good shirtless.

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          • #20
            I've never done Crossfit, my reintroduction into physical fitness came through the Army's Functional Fitness classes, which are offered free to soldiers & their families. It's similar to Crossfit, though, hour-long, mix of different weight-bearing & aerobic exercises. After doing it for 10 months, I was in the best shape I had been since I was a teenager (& I'm a long way from that now), then I had a medical condition (never determined properly, probably labyrinthitis) that ended my stint. I'm currently trying to work back to my previous level of fitness, & hope to resume classes in the next month. After all, what's the alternative?

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            • #21
              Originally posted by Abu Reena View Post
              Seriously? 45 minutes doesn't come remotely close to "chronic cardio." You could jog at a steady state for 45 minutes and it's not chronic cardio. My lifting in the gym takes about 45 minutes to an hour and it's not chronic cardio (in fact, it's not cardio at all). PB isn't an excuse for laziness. Exercising can take an hour and it's fine. What Mark decries is extended periods of steady state cardio where you keep your heart rate above 85% of max. A slow jog for 45 minutes (assuming you're reasonably in shape) isn't chronic cardio. And Crossfit is anything but steady state. If anything, it's intervals, maybe some sprinting, etc.

              That said, to answer your original question: Starting Strength. Work that for a few months until you have decent strength, then go from there.
              Sure it does- 45 minutes is about the lower end of what could be considered chronic cardio, but the other factors are more relevant:
              Are you recovering properly before your next workout?/How often are you doing these workouts?
              Is your heart rate maintained above 75% or so for the duration of the workout?

              I feel that the main concern is lack of recovery time when it comes to "chronic" cardio. A 45-minute run every day at a 7-8 minute pace would be chronic cardio for me. Once a week isn't a big deal at all. Other people have different numbers, different recovery rates, different speeds that they can run at.

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              • #22
                Originally posted by jfreaksho View Post
                Sure it does- 45 minutes is about the lower end of what could be considered chronic cardio, but the other factors are more relevant:
                Are you recovering properly before your next workout?/How often are you doing these workouts?
                Is your heart rate maintained above 75% or so for the duration of the workout?

                I feel that the main concern is lack of recovery time when it comes to "chronic" cardio. A 45-minute run every day at a 7-8 minute pace would be chronic cardio for me. Once a week isn't a big deal at all. Other people have different numbers, different recovery rates, different speeds that they can run at.
                Fine, but there's this fear that's pervasive on this board of "ooh, I ran a mile, chronic cardio." 45 minutes of interval work that CF provides is not steady state chronic cardio.

                A 45 minute run every day at a 7-8 minute pace would be chronic cardio for me, but a 45 minute jog at an 11 minute pace would not be. I wouldn't do it, but not because it's "chronic cardio." I wouldn't do it because it's boring. I'd rather swing a kettlebell around, do deadlifts or play hockey.

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