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  • Sit-ups help

    Hi All,

    I've been attempting to do some sit-ups in order to pass an upcoming fitness test.

    The test requires sit-ups to be performed without feet anchored, which I have difficulty to do, as my feet just lift off the ground.

    I can knock out a heap when my feet are anchored however cant do one of the required type.

    Can anyone suggest how to build the strength to help with the above?

    su.gif
    I'll be back

  • #2
    keep working at it?

    push your heels into the floor?
    beautiful
    yeah you are

    Baby if you time travel back far enough you can avoid that work because the dust won't be there. You're too pretty to be working that hard.
    lol

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    • #3
      Abs are stabelizer muscles, not contracting muscles. Do planks. Obviously do sit ups to pratice but, planks will strengthen. Sit ups wont. Sit ups are more a measure of strength than a builder of strength.

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      • #4
        Sit ups tend to be more hip flexor than abdominal, especially with the feet anchored. Abdominals are just as much movement muscles as stabilizers, so I'd do both: planks and continuing to practice unanchored by pressing your heels into the floor.
        Josh Vernier, CPT

        My Journal

        Evolution Revolution Fitness

        "The question isn't who is going to let me; it's who is going to stop me."

        -Ayn Rand

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        • #5
          Thanks all, appreciate the feedback

          How do planks build strength when there is no range of movement?
          I'll be back

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          • #6
            Originally posted by BigJilm View Post
            Thanks all, appreciate the feedback

            How do planks build strength when there is no range of movement?
            Try them and you will find out! They are an isometric exercise. Basically, you're resisting the force of gravity on your core by keeping it straight instead of letting it sag as it would if you totally relaxed your core. Isometrics don't look like anything is happening, but you can generate some crazy tension with them.

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            • #7
              Agreed with planks. Download Mark's PB Fitness e-book and do the progression he suggests. Spidermans... side-planks... up-downs... these are all things that Mark has in his book and my personal trainer had me do (back when I had a trainer... sigh...). They're awesome for your abs!

              Also, don't forget to do back exercises, too. Your "core" includes abs, obliques and lower back -- increase your strength in your abs and you can weaken your back. Do some back exercises to even things out.
              >> Current Stats: 90% Primal / 143 lbs / ~25% BF
              >> Goal (by 1 Jan 2014): 90% Primal / 135-ish pounds / 20-22% BF

              >> Upcoming Fitness Feats: Tough Mudder, June 2013
              >> Check out my super-exciting journal by clicking these words.

              Weight does NOT equal health -- ditch the scale, don't be a slave to it!

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              • #8
                Originally posted by MissJecka View Post
                Do some back exercises to even things out.
                Thanks! PB Fitness doesn't include back exercises. What would you suggest?
                I'll be back

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                • #9
                  If you have no problem with the anchored version then there may be a simple technical issue here. Try extending your legs a little further in front of you (and thus opening up your hip flexors) - this can sometimes help. A video of your technique would also help.
                  Sandbag Training For MMA & Combat Sports
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                  • #10
                    My situp skills improved drastically with pullups and leg raises. Laying on the floor and raising your legs (even if they are bent) up off the floor is a good place to start as well. The straighter your legs, the harder it gets. When you can do it with straight legs, then you can move on to hanging from a bar and lifting your legs. I've done a lot of situps over the years, but leg raises improved my numbers much more than simply trying to do more situps. It used to be that I couldn't do any situps without anchored feet, but now I could probably pass the Army test without. I use a lot less hip flexor than I used to as well.

                    Is there a requirement on how bent your legs have to be? The Army requires that your knees be at a 90 degree angle or tighter, but they require someone to hold your feet. The farther out your feet are, the easier it gets. I've never seen a situp test that prohibits anchoring the feet. What is this test for? Do they have an official description of how the situps are supposed to be done? What else is in this test? Can you wear heavy shoes just for this event? What, exactly, do you feel is your problem with this event? How many are you supposed to do? How many can you do? What is the time allotted?

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by BigJilm View Post
                      Thanks! PB Fitness doesn't include back exercises. What would you suggest?
                      The ones I do are:

                      Swimmer

                      Swan

                      Cat Stretch

                      Child's Pose

                      I actually do all four in that order after I do my planks.
                      >> Current Stats: 90% Primal / 143 lbs / ~25% BF
                      >> Goal (by 1 Jan 2014): 90% Primal / 135-ish pounds / 20-22% BF

                      >> Upcoming Fitness Feats: Tough Mudder, June 2013
                      >> Check out my super-exciting journal by clicking these words.

                      Weight does NOT equal health -- ditch the scale, don't be a slave to it!

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Back exercises we do in my class:

                        Stand in a squat position. Raise up your arms straight, palms facing each other. Now flap your arms back as far as you can and back to center. Switch your palms facing out and do the same. You should feel this in your lower back.

                        Stand in a squat position and hold a very large ball or other object straight up over your head. Hold it as high as you can for as long as you can. This will HUUUURRRRRTTT!!!

                        One day we did situps over a large ball. Sit at the end of the ball, lean back over the ball, do situps one hand to each ankle. Try to keep the chest high. Really made my abs sore like nothing else and did not hurt my back, so it was obvious I wasn't using back muscles to make up for my flabby abs.
                        Female, 5'3", 50, Max squat: 202.5lbs. Max deadlift: 225 x 3.

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                        • #13
                          Sorry I can't help you, other than to diss sit-ups in entirety. The damage they do the spine is enormous, and they're not exactly functional unless you are a very weak person to start with. If I try to do sit-ups, I get a nauseating scraping POP each rep, somewhere around L2 or L3, and if I don't stop, it gets swollen and hurts for up to a week. That's a cartilage/soft tissue injury. I'm just lucky it out-and-out hurts me, unlike many others who simply accumulate damage for decades only to accrue scar tissue and damage.

                          I do hanging L-sits, leg lifts, backwards leg lift with gentle spine flexion, lots of good core work, but not with pressure on the spine.
                          Crohn's, doing SCD

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Kingofturtles View Post
                            Abs are stabelizer muscles, not contracting muscles. Do planks. Obviously do sit ups to pratice but, planks will strengthen. Sit ups wont. Sit ups are more a measure of strength than a builder of strength.
                            Sit ups test hip flexor strength - so says the Army. And hip flexor strength is precisely why I'm doing battle with my sciatic nerve right now (muscle imbalance so say my chiropractor/running coach).

                            unless you HAVE to do sit ups, like b/c it's a part of your job or something, I'd give them up.
                            Primal since March 5, 2012
                            SW: 221 | CW: 204 | LPW: 166 | UGW: 140 (80 lbs loss)



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                            • #15
                              The situps are required for the role. There are two stages, below is the technique requirements.

                              : Fitness in the ADF - Defence Jobs Australia

                              Initially I can do them with feet anchored, but once I hit recruit training there are further minimum standards that must be met, which include in anchored situps.
                              I'll be back

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