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Body by Science - Hitting a Wall

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  • Body by Science - Hitting a Wall

    I started doing BBS strength training early last month and it has been going well. However, with two of the exercises I am not seeing so much improvement in one and none at all in the other for two sessions now.

    I have two thoughts:- Number 1. Is that although previously seven days between sessions was enough, my body is now taking longer to adapt as I'm 62. Number 2. These two exercises are done last and I'm a bit knackered before I get to them so I am already weakened enough to cause this problem.

    Anyone have knowledge/experience of the problem?
    Why use a sledge hammer to crack a nut when a steam roller is even more effective, and, is fun to drive.

  • #2
    I don't do body by science but it would help if we knew what exercises you are talking about and perhaps the order of what you are doing, the weigh involved and how big is the jump you are trying to make.
    Eating primal is not a diet, it is a way of life.
    PS
    Don't forget to play!

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    • #3
      Yes please list your workout and we can go from there.

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      • #4
        If I recall my one reading of BBS correctly, 7 days was the minimum recovery time they recommend. That's the whole point of their system- maximum results from minimum time.

        Also, depending on the exercises, they might just be more difficult for you (like barbell row is for me) and you just won't progress the same way.

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        • #5
          Dr McGuff stated in the book that muscle growth/adaptation takes between five and fifteen days depending on the person. At the start, I was apparently OK with seven or eight days. When I came back from a ten day holiday everything was fine. I tried a five day rest and that didn't work. Went back to seven for this last session and still had the hiccup with the last two exercises. That's one reason I'm giving it eight days before I go back again.

          Seated Row, Leg Press, Chest Press, Leg Curl, Overhead Press, Leg Extension and Pull Down in that order. They're all captive weights as I'm in the gym on my own. My next session, after eight days rest, will be on Tuesday. I shall try reversing the order and check the results.

          TBH, I do not mind if I only do the exercises every fifteen days. It's just that I wanted to speed things up a bit if my genes will take it. And, once I'm as strong as I am going to get, it will be every fifteen days anyway.
          Why use a sledge hammer to crack a nut when a steam roller is even more effective, and, is fun to drive.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Nigel View Post
            Dr McGuff stated in the book that muscle growth/adaptation takes between five and fifteen days depending on the person. At the start, I was apparently OK with seven or eight days. When I came back from a ten day holiday everything was fine. I tried a five day rest and that didn't work. Went back to seven for this last session and still had the hiccup with the last two exercises. That's one reason I'm giving it eight days before I go back again.

            Seated Row, Leg Press, Chest Press, Leg Curl, Overhead Press, Leg Extension and Pull Down in that order. They're all
            captive weights as I'm in the gym on my own. My next session, after eight days rest, will be on Tuesday. I shall try reversing the order and check the results.

            TBH, I do not mind if I only do the exercises every fifteen days. It's just that I wanted to speed things up a bit if my genes will take it. And, once I'm as strong as I am going to get, it will be every fifteen days anyway.
            Nigel, part of the problem is that you added two exercises by way of the leg curls and extensions. The rest are what would be the BIG 5. I can tell you that done properly, the BIG 5 is a killer and I would struggle with added exercises.

            My suggestion is to drop those two exercises. They aren't real good mass builders anyway. The BIG 5 is designed to hit all the major muscle groups to build a good foundation. Increasing the volume from there goes against the whole thing.

            You could though, every so many workouts, drop say the overhead press and maybe the rows and insert those two if you are intent on doing them.

            It is clear to me that you have gotten stronger and that this workout has too much volume now. Reduce it to the five and stay at 7 days. See how you do then.

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            • #7
              I agree with the previous poster re those two isolation exercises. The leg press alone will work everything if you can't do squats, just by changing foot position on the plate will focus on quads, or glutes and hamstrings, or adductors. I don't use machines now, but if I was doing, say 3 sets of 10 reps I'd do something like:

              Set 1 - Feet high and relatively close on plate - hammys and glutes
              Set 2 - Feet close and low on plate - quads
              Set 3 - Feet a little wider, low and slightly turned out - adductors (remembering to ensure knees track toes)

              Those 3 sets would work pretty much everything (I don't like to turn toes in for abductors - people seem to send their knees off in all directions) - You'll work the quads and hamstrings without needing those isolation exercises, which are FAB for ironing out asymmetries and for injury rehab, but relatively pointless if you are not in those groups.

              Any core work in there? Woodchops are good on the cable machine
              Last edited by PureFunctionalFitness; 08-29-2012, 10:00 AM.

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              • #8
                To the previous poster, he is doing a program/workout called Body By Science. It is a high intensity program whereby one all out slow controlled set is performed to momentary muscular failure for each exercise. They are intense, brief and infrequent workouts, allowing maximum recovery time between workouts.

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                • #9
                  fair enough, will look it up

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                  • #10
                    NIgel I'm 56. I took the opposite approach. As I started to stall I reduce it from the big 5 to the big 3. One week was chest press and row, the following week was the shopulder press and lat pulldown.

                    While I had some modest gains doing the leg press every week, my best gains came from doing the leg press once every four weeks.

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                    • #11
                      NIgel
                      I'm 56. I took the opposite approach. As I started to stall I reduced it from the big 5 to the big 3. One week was chest press and row, the following week was the shoulder press and lat pulldown.

                      While I had some modest gains doing the leg press every week, my best gains came from doing the leg press once every four weeks. It works for me. Approximate gains of 24 lbs of muscle mass in 3 years.

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                      • #12
                        We better be careful here Vick!

                        All of this BBS discussion is liable to stir up some real anger around here!!

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Forever Young View Post
                          My suggestion is to drop those two exercises. They aren't real good mass builders anyway. The BIG 5 is designed to hit all the major muscle groups to build a good foundation. Increasing the volume from there goes against the whole thing.

                          You could though, every so many workouts, drop say the overhead press and maybe the rows and insert those two if you are intent on doing them.

                          It is clear to me that you have gotten stronger and that this workout has too much volume now. Reduce it to the five and stay at 7 days. See how you do then.
                          Thanks for that. I hadn't thought of dropping the extra two. That makes sense to me so back to The Big 5 it is. It'll take less time too!

                          I just knew I'd get the answer here.
                          Last edited by Nigel; 08-30-2012, 06:31 AM.
                          Why use a sledge hammer to crack a nut when a steam roller is even more effective, and, is fun to drive.

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Vick View Post
                            my best gains came from doing the leg press once every four weeks.
                            Thanks for that. I suspect Forever Young has nailed it. I was just trying to improve on something that can not logically be improved upon.
                            Why use a sledge hammer to crack a nut when a steam roller is even more effective, and, is fun to drive.

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Forever Young View Post
                              All of this BBS discussion is liable to stir up some real anger around here!!
                              Oh dear, I'm afraid I'm not as devout as some here and must expect some crucifixion (I know, I'm a lucky b@st@rd) every now and again. The way I see it, I can please at least one person with everything I do. Me.
                              Why use a sledge hammer to crack a nut when a steam roller is even more effective, and, is fun to drive.

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