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How to prepare for a 5k, the primal way

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  • How to prepare for a 5k, the primal way

    So, I'm considering running a 5k this fall. My oldest son loves to run and is registered with his dad for three 5k races September through December. I haven't run in a few years due to my rheumatoid arthritis. It affects my knees and my hands the most. Last time I ran, I was in pain for a few weeks.

    I'm under the care of a great acupuncturist and physician, and I've been feeling pain free for months. And now that I'm eating the primal-paleo way, I feel even better. I'm not overweight and I do swim, do yoga, hike, kayak and workout with weights (when my kids lets me).

    I'd love some advice on a primal couch to 5k program. Most of the programs I see that help you train for a 5k sound like chronic cardio to me, running six days a week.

    Has anyone trained for a 5k in a more primal way? Fewer running days? More weights? I'm not being lazy as much as fearful that an intense chronic cardio running program will set me back on the path of inflammation and pain.

    Many thanks!
    http://www.marksdailyapple.com/forum...d61289-12.html

  • #2
    Not sure 5k is chronic cardio but there may be issues in your case with your health. If you are going to run, you gotta run there are no two ways about it. I had a friend run 5k simply after doing weights, kb training and lots of sprints.
    Eating primal is not a diet, it is a way of life.
    PS
    Don't forget to play!

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    • #3
      One word - SPRINT

      I did it, I hadn't run for years, about a month of sprinting most weeks and I decided to see if I could run 5k and I did with no specific running training. I was also walking regularly for upto an hour at a time.

      I would from my experiance suggest 1 - 2 sprint sessions a week, up to 10 full out sprints in total - as far as you can without dropping speed, rest till you are breathing nearly normally again and sprint again. So either go out once and aim to do 10 (this will leave you wishing you were dead the first couple of times) or go out twice and do upto 5 each time. To be honest if you manage 6 the first week I'll be impressed.

      Pick a 5k route, walk it at least once a week, preferably more often. Pretty fast, don't amble. Then in about 4 weeks try running the whole 5K. I bet you'll do it.

      For reference you could try running 5K now and try again every 2 weeks or so and see how you improve.
      You know all those pictures of Adam and Eve where they have belly button? Think about it..................... take as long as you need........................

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      • #4
        That was exactly what I was wondering: if I could do it by focusing on sprints. So many 5k programs tell you to run steadily 1-2.3 miles 6 days a week. I was thinking I could minimize stress on my joints by focusing on sprints 2 days a week instead of daily running. Sorry if I wasn't clear about that.

        I walk/hike anywhere between 2-5 miles most days of the week (with my kids, usually one on me and dog).

        Thanks for sharing your plan, Tribal Rob. I'll report back. Up until now, I've been sprinting in the pool, meaning I swim as fast as I can without stopping until I can't go anymore, rest, recover and do that a few times while my oldest does his swim class. I haven't actually sprinted, as in running, in 2+ years.
        http://www.marksdailyapple.com/forum...d61289-12.html

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        • #5
          The c25k program that I followed only had you running 3 days a week.

          Cool Running | The Couch-to-5K Running Plan

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          • #6
            I used c25k and it worked nicely for me. I'm running Warrior Dash tomorrow and don't feel I'll have any trouble. With the running part at least.

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            • #7
              5ks are my favorite distance (cuz I'm lazy, and I mainly race for the t-shirt and swag, lol)
              I highly recommend Jeff Galloway's run-walk-run method. It's similar to couch to 5k, but you are constantly switching between sprinting and walking, sparing your muscles by frequently shifting between compound groups, and reducing the chance of injury.
              Additionally, with your arthritis being a factor, I would recommend cutting out all nightshades for a month and seeing how it affects you during training. I've noticed that I have joint pain when I consume tomatoes, bell peppers, and cucumbers (nightshades), but when I eliminate them the pain is gone. I recommend everyone with joint issues/arthritis give it a go, as they might be sensitive as well.
              --Trish (Bork)
              TROPICAL TRADITIONS REFERRAL # 7625207
              http://pregnantdiabetic.blogspot.com
              FOOD PORN BLOG! http://theprimaljunkfoodie.blogspot.com

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              • #8
                Cucumbers are not members of the nightshade family. They belong to the gourd family, the same as pumpkins, squash and melons.

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                • #9
                  Fair enough, but I've noticed cucumbers bug me too!
                  --Trish (Bork)
                  TROPICAL TRADITIONS REFERRAL # 7625207
                  http://pregnantdiabetic.blogspot.com
                  FOOD PORN BLOG! http://theprimaljunkfoodie.blogspot.com

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Thanks for all the suggestions!

                    I did give up nightshades for 2 years with little overall change in my RA. I've added back locally grown, seasonal heirloom tomatoes and some eggplant and have not had a flare-up. I don't eat tomatoes or eggplant out of season, or I try very hard not to. I receive monthly acupuncture treatments, and my rheumatologist is pretty holistically oriented so I'm not on medication. She was actually the person who suggested going grain-free.
                    http://www.marksdailyapple.com/forum...d61289-12.html

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                    • #11
                      I loosely adhered to the Couch-to-5K program this spring (ran about 2x a week on top of my regular Crossfit workouts) and it helped me shave off about 1.5 minutes from my 5K time - which was always steady no matter how I tried to train on my own. So I'd definitely recommend it and can attest that even if you run a little less than they recommend, you will still get good results.

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                      • #12
                        Years ago, I found that doing sprints uphill made me faster and endure the long runs better. I'd sprint up the hill, carefully walk down to recover and repeat pretty much until I was too exhausted to continue.
                        Good luck with your run

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                        • #13
                          I recon if you are walking pretty much everyday you are well set up to do a 5K, it's really only shifting things up a gear for 30 mins or so. That's certainly what I found when I tried it. The sprints gave me the extra strenght needed to up the pace from walking to running without actually running less than 5K.

                          As a side note, I am now doing a weekly run, adding a mile each week and I'm up to 5 miles already dispite taking a break for illness and working like a loon(though my speed was down so I'm gonna repeat the distance next week to get it down to below 50mins before adding another mile the week after), so it still seems to be working for longer distances too.
                          You know all those pictures of Adam and Eve where they have belly button? Think about it..................... take as long as you need........................

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                          • #14
                            Thanks for all the data points and sharing your workouts. I'm very encouraged I can do a 5k by the fall with the right kind of training and not trigger my RA. Getting enough sleep (hard with a baby still waking) and keeping my stress level low is also key to managing the inflammation of RA.
                            http://www.marksdailyapple.com/forum...d61289-12.html

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                            • #15
                              I did a 5K in 25minutes flat without "training". In fact I hadn't done any running in almost a year prior to it. Just HIT resistance exercise 1x/week...some random swim sprints and walking.

                              If you wanna post a phenomenal time you should probably run that distance a couple times a week to gear up your neuromuscular response. I think if I had done that for just a month leading up to the race I could have posted a time closer to the ultracompetitive guys in my age group.

                              At under a half hour I wouldn't consider it "chronic cardio" to run a 5K a couple times a week.

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