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Exercises for balance

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  • #16
    Also, having read some things on MDA about inflammation (primarily as it relates to exercise, as in overtraining), I really don't think I need to be adding intense exercise on top of my current typical workday.

    For a wide variety of reasons, my job is stressful. Part of it has to do with me having a learning disability related to numbers--and I deal with numbers all day long, entering them in a computer database and occasionally adding them up with an adding machine. I have to check and recheck myself when I do this which slows me down, yet I have to produce a certain amount of work every day.

    After months and months of being told in various ways that I'm essentially a slacker and not a "team player" and yadda yadda yadda, I decided a few weeks ago that "I'll show you!"

    Currently, I am holding my own at work. But at the end of the day, I often feel as if I am someone who has physically over-trained. Only instead of concentrating on lifting weights or sprinting or whatever, I have been concentrating on keeping my body still and my eyes and brain focused on a computer screen.

    I go home exhausted but unable to relax. My whole body aches and my muscles are stiff.

    Because I can't afford to lose my job and literally have no time or energy to look for another one, I have to figure out some strategy to combat what are obviously symptoms of inflammation. Good nutrition is one thing that is helping. Some kind of exercise has to be another thing. The alternative to sitting still all day has to be moving, right?

    If someone came up with a simple, effective, strength-building form of exercise that was also the relaxation equivalent of four jiggers of rum knocked back all at once . . . that person would be wealthy beyond belief.

    Edith

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    • #17
      Originally posted by entwyf View Post
      If someone came up with a simple, effective, strength-building form of exercise that was also the relaxation equivalent of four jiggers of rum knocked back all at once . . . that person would be wealthy beyond belief.

      Edith
      Err, do Yoga/Drinking, where you down a shot for every pose you do

      Also I really think you need to find a new job, or just quit and wing it - I've been through work stess and decied to be poor and happy, you will probably come to a point when you realise it's just not worth the stress and your health for this job you hate, you only get one life, live it how you want.
      You know all those pictures of Adam and Eve where they have belly button? Think about it..................... take as long as you need........................

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      • #18
        Originally posted by Tribal Rob View Post
        Err, do Yoga/Drinking, where you down a shot for every pose you do

        Also I really think you need to find a new job, or just quit and wing it - I've been through work stess and decied to be poor and happy, you will probably come to a point when you realise it's just not worth the stress and your health for this job you hate, you only get one life, live it how you want.
        The Corpse Pose and rum do seem like a natural combination . . .

        You are so right, I absolutely need to find a new job. Today would not be too soon. Turning in my two weeks' notice Monday would be wonderful.

        Please reply to this post if you hear anything this afternoon indicating that someone in Rochester is desperate for an English major who has squandered her talents for years but is still sharp when it comes to communicating complex information in simple direct ways.

        Editing, proofreading, organizing documents, organizing an office space layout, making PowerPoints, building cross-cultural communication bridges, baking a killer chocolate cake . . . I can do a lot.

        Meanwhile, I still need work at the job which allows me to pay my mortgage and my bills and not starve. I have winged it often in the past; going back to pet-sitting or home health aiding or something similar won't cut it.

        Over the past few days, I have begin to think that, until something better comes along, I need to approach work the way weight lifters seem approach their exercise programs . . . in achieving their goals, they are concerned with technique, pacing, incremental increases in difficulty, avoiding over-training, resting, maintaining good nutrition. If I--and many other people--thought this way about work, wouldn't work be a lot different?

        Instead, work seems too often to be a bunch of ninety-eight pound weaklings sitting around complaining about how unfair it is of the boss to expect them to life twice their body weight. Maybe. But what if the ninety-eight pound weaklings accept the challenge and discover that they can do it and a lot more?

        Meanwhile, today is the typical and somewhat strange Saturday I've started having. After what I've come to think of as a week of heavy lifting with poor technique and no rest, I am mentally alert and physically wiped out. After a week of being chained to a desk, I need to move but I just want to sit.

        This is different from a couple of months ago, when I didn't want to move, period.

        Later today, after I get back from the grocery store, I want to sit down and review what people have said here so far and then contact individuals with some questions.

        I am always impressed by the helpfulness and good humor of people who post on the forums here. Thanks to what I've read on MDA, I have made some significant leaps toward feeling human again.

        Edith

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        • #19
          Originally posted by KKDMB View Post
          Lynna - with all due respect, tai chi is not for everyone.
          For that matter, it's not useful to people born with little balance.
          That's how I found this convo, trying to help my squats but I have no balance. Born that way. Nothing will fix it or train it or help. Yes, yes, I see you smirking. Look, as a child, my dad was a skate guard at a skating rink. That meant I roller skated every night for about 4 years. I never got off the wall. In high school, everyone had inline skates. I tried. I did. I can't skate outside. As an adult, I took many ice skating lessons with my 5-year-old. He joined the pee wee hockey team. I barely can skate without touching the wall. When I walk, I can't walk a straight line to save my life. I can barely ride a bike.
          And my squats are crap. I just saw a video of training by putting your feet against a baseboard and your hands on the wall and squatting. I can't do that even an inch because I can't balance without bending way forward.
          And yes, I took tai chi while my boy was in kung fu. Fell over too much. After a year, I gave it up. Not everyone can train their way into better balance. If so, I sure haven't found a way to get better. It's not any worse, but it sure isn't any better either.
          Well, back to the squats. I have another set yet to do.

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          • #20
            Originally posted by Cinnamonbite View Post
            For that matter, it's not useful to people born with little balance.
            That's how I found this convo, trying to help my squats but I have no balance. Born that way. Nothing will fix it or train it or help. Yes, yes, I see you smirking. Look, as a child, my dad was a skate guard at a skating rink. That meant I roller skated every night for about 4 years. I never got off the wall. In high school, everyone had inline skates. I tried. I did. I can't skate outside. As an adult, I took many ice skating lessons with my 5-year-old. He joined the pee wee hockey team. I barely can skate without touching the wall. When I walk, I can't walk a straight line to save my life. I can barely ride a bike.
            And my squats are crap. I just saw a video of training by putting your feet against a baseboard and your hands on the wall and squatting. I can't do that even an inch because I can't balance without bending way forward.
            And yes, I took tai chi while my boy was in kung fu. Fell over too much. After a year, I gave it up. Not everyone can train their way into better balance. If so, I sure haven't found a way to get better. It's not any worse, but it sure isn't any better either.
            Well, back to the squats. I have another set yet to do.
            Just because you weren't able to improve your balance with tai chi, doesn't mean someone else cannot. It gets a little irritating that people discount something because it didn't help them for some reason -- that doesn't mean it won't work for someone else. I had terrible balance when I started tai chi and after a few weeks my balance steadily improved. One must practice their forms, at least 30 minutes everyday. If one just takes a class once a week and does nothing else, their balance will definitely not improve. I know a 75 year old man with Meniere's disease and he credits tai chi with helping him immensely, in fact, he participated in a tai chi tournament in China and received an award when he was 69. He started tai chi when he was in his early 60s.

            I haven't practiced tai chi in awhile and today I took my first yoga class, my balance was crap, but I know if I continue with it it will get better.
            Last edited by Lynna; 10-02-2012, 10:21 AM.

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