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Exhaustion after lifting? Pre/post WOM?

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  • Exhaustion after lifting? Pre/post WOM?

    Another newbie lifting question or two...

    Yesterday at CF, for strength-training Monday, we focused on front squats. Wall ball to warm up, and then 3x3x3x3x3 front squats. Went well. Was jazzed.

    Today? I'm utterly exhausted. Yes, my quads are a bit sore, but it's the sheer exhaustion that took me by surprise. I'm dragging. What I don't know if this is completely unrelated to the LHT the day before, or if it's a normal reaction for someone very new to strength training/CF.

    Also, there's been a bit of discussion regarding best pre- and post-workout meals. I get the notion of HF/LC on non-lifting days and HC/LF (primal, of course!) on lifting days, and I will be basing my meals around this going forward. But what I'm not sure about is on the WO day itself, is it better to eat HC 2+ hours before lifting? After lifting? Or is this another place where everyone is different and I will need to experiment to see what works best for me?

    As always, many thanks in advance...
    F, 44 years old, 111.8 lbs, 4 feet 11.5 inches (yes, that half inch matters!)

    **1st place sparring, AAU TKD regional qualifier, 2/15/15 - It's damn good to hit like a girl!**

    **First-ever 5K race 11/28/13: 37 minutes, 18+ seconds, no stopping**

  • #2
    Meal timing doesn't seem to really matter, from what I can tell, except for maybe those people near the top of the athletic world. Some people like working out fasted, others like eating a few hours before the workout.

    The two big things are that you eat enough, and that you sleep enough. The amount of sleep you were getting before might not be enough anymore.

    Comment


    • #3
      i agree with jfreaksho. a lot of the timing and nutrition around working out has to do with your goals. if you're looking to get big, higher carb post workout is good for refilling those spent glycogen stores. if you're in it to get strong and healthy, don't worry too much about it. personally, i love working out in a fasted state, and will even go a few hours post workout without food. figure out what works best for you and your goals.

      as far as being tired...that's normal. you worked your body hard, and it needs to rest to recover. you'll probably want to eat a lot. go for it. also, if you're new to this routine and it hasn't started yet, get ready to be sore. DOMS can set in a couple days after your workout.
      http://www.marksdailyapple.com/forum/thread60178.html

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      • #4
        Excellent - many thanks, @jfreaksho and @primalrob!
        F, 44 years old, 111.8 lbs, 4 feet 11.5 inches (yes, that half inch matters!)

        **1st place sparring, AAU TKD regional qualifier, 2/15/15 - It's damn good to hit like a girl!**

        **First-ever 5K race 11/28/13: 37 minutes, 18+ seconds, no stopping**

        Comment


        • #5
          Big workouts require big meals. I am doing a pretty intense workout for 6 weeks and I am eating a metric ton each day. I'm pretty sore on the following days but I never feel tired or exhausted (except for immediately after my workout). This is the first time where I have really gone out of my way, painful at times, to eat A LOT and I can definitely tell the difference. I was previously running leangains, but during these 6 weeks I haven't done any macro management. Just big ol' primal meals (with plenty of primal carbs).

          If you're working out hard, don't be afraid to eat. Fuel the workouts! For me it's made a world of difference.
          "The problem with quoting someone on the Internet is, you never know if it's legit" - Abraham Lincoln

          Comment


          • #6
            Nutrition and recovery strategies are obviously very important but don't underestimate a proper heavy session. I have had to take 2 weeks off following some very intense deadlifting in the past - it can take that much out of you.

            This is why I laugh when I hear people on this board talking about adding extra exercises in to programs or wondering whether they did enough. If you have to ask the question the you probably didn't do it right.

            Eat lots following a tough session and allow yourself the recovery you need.
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            • #7
              Many thanks, @Fernaldo and @Coach Palfrey! I'll definitely be eating more and attempting to get more sleep.

              You folks are definitely making this less intimidating. That might sound goofy, but last year, I never would have imagined that 40+ year old me, at less than five feet tall and with a tricky lower back, could ever, EVER, consider weightlifting. Thanks for all of your support, advice and encouragement. When I eventually am a little old lady, I want to tote the 70-lb bags of kitty litter easily!
              F, 44 years old, 111.8 lbs, 4 feet 11.5 inches (yes, that half inch matters!)

              **1st place sparring, AAU TKD regional qualifier, 2/15/15 - It's damn good to hit like a girl!**

              **First-ever 5K race 11/28/13: 37 minutes, 18+ seconds, no stopping**

              Comment


              • #8
                Jackie, I've been a Crossfitter for about 2.5 years, and I've found that next-day exhaustion is usually related to how well I slept; not how hard the previous day's workout was or what I ate before or after. Either way, though, listen to your body. If you're dragging, take it easy. Try doing some slow movement (walking usually works best for me) and after 10 or 15 minutes if you're still dragging, call it off and rest. But if you're feeling a bit more perky after 10 or 15 minutes, keep on with the slow movement.

                A lot of Crossfitters are type "A", who can push things too far. With age comes wisdom... I'm 55 and I've learned just how much I can push and when I should back off. Do what seems right!

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                • #9
                  Thanks, Goldie -- hugely appreciated! I'm not sleeping well, and probably won't for the near future. (I have a 19-year-old cranky cat, who starts getting demanding around 4 am. I usually can stay in bed until around 5:15 or so, but then she gets insanely loud, and I don't want to wake the entire house. And so...meh.) But I'll do my best to know when to push and when to say, "Eh, no." Thanks again!
                  F, 44 years old, 111.8 lbs, 4 feet 11.5 inches (yes, that half inch matters!)

                  **1st place sparring, AAU TKD regional qualifier, 2/15/15 - It's damn good to hit like a girl!**

                  **First-ever 5K race 11/28/13: 37 minutes, 18+ seconds, no stopping**

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Have you tried explaining Crossfit to the cat? She might understand why you need to stay in bed.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by mike_h View Post
                      Have you tried explaining Crossfit to the cat? She might understand why you need to stay in bed.
                      I have. Many times. She really doesn't care. I have a cruel Feline Overlord...
                      F, 44 years old, 111.8 lbs, 4 feet 11.5 inches (yes, that half inch matters!)

                      **1st place sparring, AAU TKD regional qualifier, 2/15/15 - It's damn good to hit like a girl!**

                      **First-ever 5K race 11/28/13: 37 minutes, 18+ seconds, no stopping**

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Simple.

                        Kill and eat the cat as a post-workout meal.

                        Problem solved.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Just like everyone is saying, nutrition and sleep, since you are new to fitness it's probably your central nervous system and your workout capacity, both will become more efficient as you continue your workouts.

                          Dedication + duration = results

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                          • #14
                            Jackie, I have to be AT work at 5:30am, so I have to get to bed by 8:45pm (and up at 4:00am) or I'm a zombie the next day. Luckily, my husband has the same hours as I do and the kids are grown and gone, so this isn't a problem. Our fuzzy kids are Golden Retrievers, and they're so laid back, they won't get up until they actually hear the dog food hitting the bowl.

                            But anyway, if it's possible, try getting to bed earlier. Or, (again, IF possible), sneak in a 15-20 minute nap some time during the day. I work in a cubemetropolis, but our women's restrooms have foyers with couches. I often see a coworker who has 3 kids under age 5 taking part of her lunch break napping there! Be creative!

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Thanks again, everyone. I can't believe how exhausted I get after a workout. Whew. Along with figuring out the eating, I'll start focusing more on getting better sleep. I appreciate all of the advice here -- thanks again!

                              And @CE402 - HAH!!! And, um, no.
                              F, 44 years old, 111.8 lbs, 4 feet 11.5 inches (yes, that half inch matters!)

                              **1st place sparring, AAU TKD regional qualifier, 2/15/15 - It's damn good to hit like a girl!**

                              **First-ever 5K race 11/28/13: 37 minutes, 18+ seconds, no stopping**

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