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Daily work-outs. How long before I'm in the red?

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  • Daily work-outs. How long before I'm in the red?

    So, according to what I believe and have seen here, working out every day should be detrimental. My muscles shouldn't have time to rebuild and I should experience joint pain, etc. This is day three of good, hard work-outs (primarily bar work like chin-ups and stuff with no name) and I've seen no detriment here on day 3. So what gives? When does my work backfire? I know I'm something of a freak, muscularly, gaining strength at low reps but bad at high-rep stuff. Could there be some people more suited to daily exercise? I'm going to stop if I feel pain or my reps go down. But so far it's been great.

    I'd track my work-outs, but a lot of what I do doesn't have names or ways to be measured. I'll at least use underhand chin-ups as a baseline.

    Did 20 chin-ups in the first set for the past three days straight. I will continue to do these first as a general test of recovery ability.
    Crohn's, doing SCD

  • #2
    Are you working the same body parts each day?

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    • #3
      Sure, workout every day if you feel good. .

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      • #4
        Pretty much! Mostly monkey stuff. I can't do much leg work because of cramps, so I focus on core strength, leg lifts, L-sits, hanging from the rings and drawing big circles with my pointed toes, clapping push-ups, clapping chin-ups, etc. Again, I work out alone, I have had no training, and know what I know mainly from anatomy and physiology and what I've picked up on the web.

        I will be intentionally doing the same exercises for the next several days on end, to have some sort of control over this experiment.

        Just banged out 40 push-ups in one set - again. So 20 chin-ups and 40 push-ups is our baseline, and those are 1 set of maxing out. I go to exhaustion. Then I always do a second set, and sometimes a third, with about 1 minute rests between. I guess I'll start recording the second and third set, too, but they're usually pretty wussy.

        Edit: Second set of push-ups = 20 reps.
        Last edited by Knifegill; 06-28-2012, 05:15 PM.
        Crohn's, doing SCD

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        • #5
          I'm rethinking my workouts as well. For over a year, I have been working out daily, maybe skipping a Saturday or Sunday now and then. Generally, every day, I have been doing either chinups, pullups, pushups, and/or squats. I would normally do like 150-200 chins/pulls, divided into 15 or 20 sets, several hundred pushups or squats in sets of 25 reps, sometimes doing these reverse pyramid style or just in straight sets.

          I never really get sore muscles. I feel the squats for a couple days if I use my 50 or 100lbs sand bags.

          A couple months ago I switched to just doing one exercsie for a whole week. Last week I did 150-200 chinups every day. This week I'm doing pullups, 100 or so a day, broken into 3-4 sets.

          Well, today I watched a Body By Science video of a guy doing 2-minute chinups and had to try.

          One minute up, hold a few seconds and one minute down--What a mother-----er!

          I'm still feeling it several hours later. I did 2 chinups like this, about 30 minutes apart. Right after the last one, I tried doing a few pullups and couldn't even do 2.

          They seem to think that a couple of these a week is all you need. I'm gonna try this for a while. Should work with squats, dips, and pushups, too.

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          • #6
            Yeah, I've done some of this slo-mo stuff! Did it for a week or two, loved it, then forgot about it in the busyness of life. I often let my last rep drag on painfully long, a sort of fuzzy application of that principle.

            But this isn't about that, it's about normal work-outs, which admittedly may be inefficient and misguided. I always get a better workout from the slo-mo stuff, myself.
            Crohn's, doing SCD

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            • #7
              Eh, I guess it all depends on intensity and the actual exercise. If you were doing 20 rep squats of 315, I guarantee you wouldn't be doing them again on the following day. Adequate food and rest affect performance obviously. But, could someone do bicep curls 7 days a week? Yeah, is there a point, not really other than a penchant for bicep curls. You gotta give your muscle time to recover and grow. Can you train like you are training and see results, sure, for how long, I guess you'll find out. And another question is, is it optimal?
              Last edited by Fernaldo; 06-28-2012, 07:30 PM.
              "The problem with quoting someone on the Internet is, you never know if it's legit" - Abraham Lincoln

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              • #8
                I don't think I could do too many chinups that I couldn't do the same amount the next day. Not that i've tried to burn myself out, I'm sure there's a point.

                When I started this trip, I wanted to create a sustainable lifestyle of diet and exercise. The diet worked itself out pretty well, and the exercising ended up being as many pushups, chins, pulls, and squats as I could fit in a day.

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                • #9
                  I don't think that the problem with working out every day (especially body weight stuff) is that your strength will deteriorate, the problem with working out too frequently is that your muscles won't have time to grow as well as they would with adequate recovery time.

                  In the military I'd do push ups, sit ups, chin ups, and stuff like that every day for weeks straight with no drop in performance. I just wonder if I would have shown better improvement if I'd been allowed to observe better work/rest cycles (I wasn't really given that choice though).

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                  • #10
                    I'm going to get all mathy and graphical here. This is a bell curve:


                    The X-Axis the sum of frequency and intensity of workouts. The Y-Axis indicates performance level increase, up is more, faster stronger whatever.

                    The more you do, up until the apex (round bit), the more gains you see. After that it's diminishing returns, i.e. "over-training." You may still be getting gains, they will however, be slower than at the apex.

                    Where exactly this point lies varies, person, diet, genetics, fitness level, etc. So the whole reason to avoid over-training is to maximize input to output ratio, why work harder than needed?

                    Regarding the military, they notoriously over-train. Mostly because everyone thinks "more is more," the focus is pretty much just getting the most people to meet the minimum standard.
                    "Go For Broke"
                    Fat Kine-230/24% @ 6'2"
                    Small Kine-168/9%
                    Now- 200/8%
                    Goal- 210/6%

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                    • #11
                      Recovery is individual. The cycle is basically workout, damage, rest/repair, eat, repeat and get stronger. The faster you can pass thru the recover/repair cycle, the quicker you can go back to working out. That's what everything from ice baths, massage, whirlpools and even steroids are about, enhancing and shortening recovery time. Programs that call for maximum rest time are successful for a larger universe of people. Individuals have different rates of repair and practice different methods of resting and diet. It's very possible to not need the longer rest times and increase workout frequency.

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                      • #12
                        In any case the OP said he's been doing this for 3 days without negative effects? 3 days? Is that enough time to come to any conclusions about anything? Of course it isn't. Not in this case anyway. If intensity is low, one could do the same thing or similar everyday. People do it all the time and its called work. Those who work a somewhat physical job do it pretty much everyday. The body adapts to this repetitive routine. Almost all who work such jobs end up with debilitating conditions from long term overuse. The object of exercise is to stimulate a positive adaptation with the least amount of actual work required. Exercise is a stress on the body and in and of itself a negative. It is perceived as a threat by your body. It then adapts to try and prevent such an event in the future. This is where we get stronger, more fit etc. Too much of this stress too often will eventually catch up to us though.

                        All this said, once in a while I think it may be beneficial to throw all this out and do something extreme for a few days or weeks and then return to a more sensible approach.

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Knifegill View Post
                          So, according to what I believe and have seen here, working out every day should be detrimental. My muscles shouldn't have time to rebuild and I should experience joint pain, etc. This is day three of good, hard work-outs (primarily bar work like chin-ups and stuff with no name) and I've seen no detriment here on day 3. So what gives? When does my work backfire? I know I'm something of a freak, muscularly, gaining strength at low reps but bad at high-rep stuff. Could there be some people more suited to daily exercise? I'm going to stop if I feel pain or my reps go down. But so far it's been great.

                          I'd track my work-outs, but a lot of what I do doesn't have names or ways to be measured. I'll at least use underhand chin-ups as a baseline.

                          Did 20 chin-ups in the first set for the past three days straight. I will continue to do these first as a general test of recovery ability.
                          A healthy person(key) can do stuff like you are talking about probably indefinitely, or at least for a long time without major issues. Maybe over-training will set in, maybe not- *true* over-training doesn't involve what you are talking about. True over-training(not a sedentary person doing too much) involves either much higher intensity work- like progressive barbell training, or multiple hours a day of competitive level intense conditioning. Trust me, once true, full blown over-training hits, you'll never mistake anything else for it- your mind and body are wrecked for days or weeks. But very, very few people will ever get all the way there.
                          Lifting Journal

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Knifegill View Post
                            So, according to what I believe and have seen here, working out every day should be detrimental. My muscles shouldn't have time to rebuild and I should experience joint pain, etc. This is day three of good, hard work-outs (primarily bar work like chin-ups and stuff with no name) and I've seen no detriment here on day 3. So what gives? When does my work backfire? I know I'm something of a freak, muscularly, gaining strength at low reps but bad at high-rep stuff. Could there be some people more suited to daily exercise? I'm going to stop if I feel pain or my reps go down. But so far it's been great.

                            I'd track my work-outs, but a lot of what I do doesn't have names or ways to be measured. I'll at least use underhand chin-ups as a baseline.

                            Did 20 chin-ups in the first set for the past three days straight. I will continue to do these first as a general test of recovery ability.
                            My 1/50 of a dollar on the question: I like to frame the issue a little differently. In other words, I don't like to say "am I working out too often" but rather "am I recovering too little." That frames recovery as a positive action rather than a negative (e.g. not working out).

                            I always try to remind myself that the workout is the stimulus, but the rest period is when the gains actually occur.

                            Take that for what it's worth. In your case, it sounds like you're doing fine on a sub-24 hour recovery period. If that ceases to be the case, you might need to stop being a recovery slacker!
                            The Champagne of Beards

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                            • #15
                              Have you ever read Brooks Kubik's Dinosaur Training? It has been a while but in the book he makes the point if you make a week person work hard all day (lets say busting rock) he will come back tired and sore. Feed him rest him send him out the next day, and the next and the next he will eventually get strong. His body will adapt.

                              Now take Grok would he get under a barbell and squat? No, one day he might haul some wood, another he might forage, the next chase down an animal. Not once would he have thought of doing SS or SL. So why do we look to them for our workouts? Time. We can take a day of lifting rock to build a house and condense the effort into a 30-60 minute session.

                              IMHO those intense sessions combined with our generally sedentary lifestyle means we do better with a period of recovery. The workouts you are doing although excellent don't have the same intensity of slinging 300lbs on your back and squatting. 40 pushups may move the same weight as a 3x5 bench routine but the intensity is spread out. Different goals, different training, so different recovery.
                              Last edited by Dirlot; 06-29-2012, 08:03 AM.
                              Eating primal is not a diet, it is a way of life.
                              PS
                              Don't forget to play!

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