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What weight kettlebell should I buy? to strengthen my back (prevent injury

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  • #16
    If you're doing 2-handed swings, I would recommend googling Tim Ferris and his do it yourself kettlebell replacement. I've been suing mine for about a year. The parts cost about $10. I'm not sure what the max weight is for it, but I've been doing four 25 pound plates

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    • #17
      Thanks FitMountain. I've spent a bit of time with the bells for general workouts and as a kb sport competitor and it was concerning when I started since I'd had previous back surgery. It's truly important to do it right. Once the technique is good, you can do a multitude of things like pace2race said. It truly is amazing the amount of ways you can find to use them.

      And Drmike I will somewhat disagree on the Bob and Jillian doing good things on the Biggest Loser idea. I don't watch the show often, but I've seen it. While I give them credit for the fact that millions have started to get their butts off the couch, I am somewhat shocked by the means in which they portray these people working out. Some of the exercises being shown are downright ridiculous and a highly trained athlete would never perform, let alone someone new to working out and obese. The best was Jillian holding a guys ankles, like doing a wheelbarrow race, and he was walking with his hands on a moving treadmill. He face planted and rolled off into a heap on the floor. I don't consider that smart or beneficial to anyone, but they have the ratings. That's not even mentioning the horror stories that have come from past contestants about how terrible the experience was and how nasty, demeaning, and horrible they were. Like forcing them to workout with injuries, even though they weren't cleared by the docs. I truly have no respect for them.

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      • #18
        I was being a bit sarcastic about Bob and Jillian the entire concept of biggest loser is stupid.

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        • #19
          UPDATE:

          I went to the gym and picked out the largest and heaviest KB on the rack.
          It is the green one. 28kg / 61lbs.

          The ONLY KB exercise I like is the basic 2-handed swing.
          I can't stand any of the other gimmicky things like snatches (that bash your wrist)
          If there is too much technique involved, I am not interested.

          So, the first set I did about 20 2-handed swings, and did sets of 10 after.
          I really had to exert myself, and felt my entire core tightening.
          I think this is a good weight for me.

          But, I will use this one at the gym for a few weeks to see if I outgrow it.
          If I do, I will get something like 70 or 80lbs. (32 to 36kg)

          Product: First Place Vinyl Coated Kettlebells

          Walmart seems to have the best prices on KB's, by far. 60lbs for $77
          http://www.walmart.com/ip/CAP-Barbel...ebell/14894512
          Last edited by OnlyBodyWeight; 06-25-2012, 08:46 PM.

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          • #20
            OnlyBodyWeight, great that you found a gym that had some for you try so you'll know what you are in the market for. You can always progress to one arm swings, alterenating swings, or use a glove to really tax the grip and make you work if it gets light. The snatches do require a ton of technique to get to the point you don't bash the arms. If all you plan on doing is swings, then the cheap ones will work fine. When you start doing cleans, presses, and snatches, they don't work so well from a comfort standpoint. Good luck!

            Sorry Drmike, didn't get the sarcasm in the post. Sorry about the unnecessary rant then.

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            • #21
              Hi Mate,

              I am 6'2" and 112kgs (about 15kgs over my fighting weight).

              Just starting to regain strength and fitness and I use a 12 kg bell for Turkish getups and one arm swings and a 25kg bell for two handed swings, I would be fine with a 16kg bell for the TGU's now after a few weeks of the 12kg. I alternate between the 12kg and the 25kg doing swings etc depending how fatigue I am feeling. will buy a 16kg bell next.

              For back strength and rehabilitation (recovering from a back injury myself) I can recommend doing Swings, Turkish get ups and Goblet squats (great for the opening the hips). . Also worth doing a few one on one sessions with a good trainer to sort technique, I did and it help heaps with the swing and TGU's.

              cheers
              "Times fun when you are having Flies" Kermit the frog

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              • #22
                I will just buy the 60lbs KB and if it gets TOO easy (unlikely), I can just move from sets/reps to a HIIT/tabatra style interval. And reduce rest time to make it harder. For now, it's the perfect weight for 2-handed swings, but I don't want to outgrow it in 1 month's time.

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                • #23
                  Originally posted by OnlyBodyWeight View Post
                  I don't want to outgrow it in 1 month's time.
                  You won't.
                  I Kettlebell therefore I am.

                  My Journal
                  My Journal

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                  • #24
                    I have been doing a few Tabata's sessions, about 1 per week ( 2 handed swings) 20/10 spilt 3 min blocks and 30-60sec rest between blocks average about 10 swings per 20 sec rep. Bloody hard... I get to about 1.5-2 blocks on the 25kg then have to swap down to the 12kg for the last 2-3 blocks.

                    I have also read good things about the 15/15 split as per viking warrior conditioning, basically 15 secs of snatchs with 16kg bell 15 sec rest repeat for 40 mins, if you can.
                    "Times fun when you are having Flies" Kermit the frog

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                    • #25
                      If you're not interesed in learning the technique then don't buy a kettle bell. You're just going to end up hurting yourself.

                      That being said, the erector spinae are mostly slow twitch muscle fibers as are the multifidus and longissimus. The way to get the best results out of training slow twitch muscles is with lots of reps at a lower weight.... I'm just saying.

                      The idea that the best way to get someone to do use proper technique is to add more weight is plain old dangerous. The best way to get someone to learn proper technique is for them to "grease the groove" with a low weight prior to increase. If they can't get the muscle sequence down, find out why certain muscles aren't firing and go from there but never, NEVER increase the weight unless you want to hurt someone. There's a reason why your client is using his shoulders vs his hips. Be a better trainer than most and figure out why. Just because someone taught you to take a short cut doesn't mean it's the right way to go.
                      Last edited by Iron Will; 06-27-2012, 10:55 AM.

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                      • #26
                        Originally posted by KimT View Post
                        I was typing while the other posts were rolling in. I agree with June68 on the lighter being counter-productive to a point. If the person, even a beginner, is somewhat strong, the body needs a weight that is heavy enough to register on the muscles and get the body to do the proper technique. Lots of times people will "muscle" through a swing and do a front shoulder raise instead of the hip pop. In all my training, 2 certs, multiple seminars with tops in the field, if someone isn't picking up on the technique, they always give them a heavier weight.
                        I just have to say something about this comment, it's driving me nuts. In what universe is it a good idea to "add weight" to an exercise when the client isn't getting the movement. This is how personal trainers get a bad name. By handing out bullshit advice like this.

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                        • #27
                          It's sound advice! When the weight is light enough that the user can and does 'muscle-up' it places undue pressure on the base of the spine. By adding weight the propensity to muscle-up is reduced thus compelling the user to adopt more correct form. It goes without saying that this is done in the presence of an experienced kettlebell instructor.
                          All the best!

                          PDJ

                          The quieter you become the more you're able to hear.

                          Mawlana Jalaludin Rumi

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                          • #28
                            Thought I would add this.. It is from a kettlebell site on the web The Best Kettlebell - Choosing the Best Kettlebell Equipment - Find the Best Kettlebells

                            Kettlebells are traditionally measured in poods, an old Russian unit of measure equivalent to 16 kg or 36 lb. The traditional sizes of kettlebells are one (16 kg/36 lb), one-and-a-half (24 kg/53 lb), and two pood (32 kg/71 lb) kettlebells. Since the kettlebells began to gain in popularity in the West, smaller and larger sizes have been introduced. You can now buy kettlebells as light as 2 kg (4.4 lb) and as heavy as 48 kg (106 lb).

                            Which weight is right for you depends on your present level of fitness and your history with strength endurance activities. Which weight is right for starting is also dependent on whether you are male or female.

                            If you are a male who keeps active but who is not used to lifting weights, a 16 kg kettlebell is a good place to start. If you have no history of significant physical activity over the past year, start with 12 kg. If, however, you perform muscle-building exercises of significant weight regularly, you might start with a 20 kg bell, possibly even 24 kg.

                            Females who keep active but do not lift should start with an 12 kg bell. Those with no history of regular exercise in the past year might start with an 8 kg kettlebell. If you keep active and are used to heavy weight-bearing exercises, you could start with a 16 kg kettlebell.

                            When choosing a kettlebell, always go conservative on the weight. In general, you want a weight that will allow you to do 20 kettlebell swings in series but no more than 30. Do not push yourself to make the 20 repetitions!

                            Kettlebell workouts challenge your heart and muscles in ways seldom touched by other forms of activity. So there is no shame in using a lighter weight at first. You can always go up, but you can damage yourself severely if you try to take on too much too soon. As usual, check with your doctor before undertaking such an endeavour.

                            If you are in rehab, be especially conservative in your choice of weight. Too much weight results in bad form. Bad form creates room for injuries. Best to start very light (or with no weight at all) and allow your body to get used to the movement.

                            I Kettlebell therefore I am.

                            My Journal
                            My Journal

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                            • #29
                              By increasing the weight you are also increasing the "pressure at the base of the spine". Anything that is going to be held by the hands is going to increase the "pressure at the base of the spine" the only way to relieve the "pressure at the base of the spine" is to lower the weight held in the hands.

                              In addition to increasing the weight in the hands, you're also creating a dynamic movement with the swing. In doing so you are increasing the load on the total spinal column. If your client can't handle a 12KG bell, what makes you think said client is all of a sudden going to be able to handle a 16KG bell?

                              Wait nope! They can't handle that either, maybe we should try a 20KG bell!! That should to the trick!

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                              • #30
                                Originally posted by tormag View Post
                                thought i would add this.. It is from a kettlebell site on the web the best kettlebell - choosing the best kettlebell equipment - find the best kettlebells

                                kettlebells are traditionally measured in poods, an old russian unit of measure equivalent to 16 kg or 36 lb. The traditional sizes of kettlebells are one (16 kg/36 lb), one-and-a-half (24 kg/53 lb), and two pood (32 kg/71 lb) kettlebells. Since the kettlebells began to gain in popularity in the west, smaller and larger sizes have been introduced. You can now buy kettlebells as light as 2 kg (4.4 lb) and as heavy as 48 kg (106 lb).

                                Which weight is right for you depends on your present level of fitness and your history with strength endurance activities. Which weight is right for starting is also dependent on whether you are male or female.

                                If you are a male who keeps active but who is not used to lifting weights, a 16 kg kettlebell is a good place to start. If you have no history of significant physical activity over the past year, start with 12 kg. If, however, you perform muscle-building exercises of significant weight regularly, you might start with a 20 kg bell, possibly even 24 kg.

                                Females who keep active but do not lift should start with an 12 kg bell. Those with no history of regular exercise in the past year might start with an 8 kg kettlebell. If you keep active and are used to heavy weight-bearing exercises, you could start with a 16 kg kettlebell.

                                When choosing a kettlebell, always go conservative on the weight. In general, you want a weight that will allow you to do 20 kettlebell swings in series but no more than 30. Do not push yourself to make the 20 repetitions!

                                Kettlebell workouts challenge your heart and muscles in ways seldom touched by other forms of activity. So there is no shame in using a lighter weight at first. You can always go up, but you can damage yourself severely if you try to take on too much too soon. As usual, check with your doctor before undertaking such an endeavour.

                                If you are in rehab, be especially conservative in your choice of weight. Too much weight results in bad form. Bad form creates room for injuries. Best to start very light (or with no weight at all) and allow your body to get used to the movement.

                                big +1!

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