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  • Runners stitch

    When sprinting, how do I handle runner's stitch?
    Don't let anybody tell you, "You can't" just because they can't.

  • #2
    Originally posted by GeorgiaPeach View Post
    When sprinting, how do I handle runner's stitch?
    Deep abdominal breathing; inhale through the nose, exhale through the mouth or bouncing lightly on mid-foot inhale through nose and continuous/extended (as long as you can) exhale through the mouth.

    *Edit: That is lightly bouncing mid-foot not on the balls of your feet.
    Last edited by pdjesson; 06-24-2012, 09:12 AM.
    All the best!

    PDJ

    The quieter you become the more you're able to hear.

    Mawlana Jalaludin Rumi

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    • #3
      While running not a whole lot you can do, deep breathing helps, slowing down, also putting pressure on the stitch.

      As far as prevention I've figured out what causes a side stitch for me, and it's drinking water (or anything) before I run. Anytime I have liquid in my stomach I get stitches.

      My window is 30 mins, I won't drink more than a sip within 30 minutes of running.
      "Go For Broke"
      Fat Kine-230/24% @ 6'2"
      Small Kine-168/9%
      Now- 200/8%
      Goal- 210/6%

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      • #4
        I find that if I do tricep stretches, where you're reaching over your head to your shoulder blades and stretching your torso/rib cage, and add a bit of a side bend, that I don't get the stitches as much.
        --Trish (Bork)
        TROPICAL TRADITIONS REFERRAL # 7625207
        http://pregnantdiabetic.blogspot.com
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        • #5
          Originally posted by Wanderlust View Post
          While running not a whole lot you can do, deep breathing helps, slowing down, also putting pressure on the stitch.

          As far as prevention I've figured out what causes a side stitch for me, and it's drinking water (or anything) before I run. Anytime I have liquid in my stomach I get stitches.

          My window is 30 mins, I won't drink more than a sip within 30 minutes of running.
          What else might cause it besides food/liquid?
          Don't let anybody tell you, "You can't" just because they can't.

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          • #6
            It's caused by a build-up of lactic acid in the liver when the muscles are using anaerobic respiration for energy. This can be prevented by improving cardiovascular fitness. Also if you eat within a few hours prior to exercise, your liver will still be working on processing metabolites from the meal, so it won't be able to recycle the lactic acid back to glucose via the Cori cycle so quickly as it would in a fasted state, and this can cause the stitch.
            F 5 ft 3. HW: 196 lbs. Primal SW (May 2011): 182 lbs (42% BF)... W June '12: 160 lbs (29% BF) (UK size 12, US size 8). GW: ~24% BF - have ditched the scales til I fit into a pair of UK size 10 bootcut jeans. Currently aligning towards 'The Perfect Health Diet' having swapped some fat for potatoes.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by paleo-bunny View Post
              It's caused by a build-up of lactic acid in the liver when the muscles are using anaerobic respiration for energy. This can be prevented by improving cardiovascular fitness. Also if you eat within a few hours prior to exercise, your liver will still be working on processing metabolites from the meal, so it won't be able to recycle the lactic acid back to glucose via the Cori cycle so quickly as it would in a fasted state, and this can cause the stitch.
              Okay, that makes sense. So maybe Do my sprinting pre-breakfast? Will that affect my need for carbs? Essentially, that would be like sprinting in a fasted state... Is that okay? Or would it be better to eat a banana, sprint, then eat breakfast?
              Don't let anybody tell you, "You can't" just because they can't.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by GeorgiaPeach View Post
                Okay, that makes sense. So maybe Do my sprinting pre-breakfast? Will that affect my need for carbs? Essentially, that would be like sprinting in a fasted state... Is that okay? Or would it be better to eat a banana, sprint, then eat breakfast?
                Yes, sprinting in a fasted state should be OK. If you're OK with caffeine, I'd advise you drink a coffee beforehand - that helps with glycogen breakdown to release glucose. Try to do it without eating the banana.

                I used to do a couple of early morning workouts like that last summer, and I was fine, but I'd carb loaded with about 100-120 g of starch the evening before.

                I usually do sprints in the evening, about 6 hours after I last ate.

                I've found that endurance cardio has helped eliminate stitches.
                F 5 ft 3. HW: 196 lbs. Primal SW (May 2011): 182 lbs (42% BF)... W June '12: 160 lbs (29% BF) (UK size 12, US size 8). GW: ~24% BF - have ditched the scales til I fit into a pair of UK size 10 bootcut jeans. Currently aligning towards 'The Perfect Health Diet' having swapped some fat for potatoes.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by paleo-bunny View Post
                  Yes, sprinting in a fasted state should be OK. If you're OK with caffeine, I'd advise you drink a coffee beforehand - that helps with glycogen breakdown to release glucose. Try to do it without eating the banana.

                  I used to do a couple of early morning workouts like that last summer, and I was fine, but I'd carb loaded with about 100-120 g of starch the evening before.

                  I usually do sprints in the evening, about 6 hours after I last ate.

                  I've found that endurance cardio has helped eliminate stitches.
                  Wouldn't the liquid make me sloshy?

                  When you say endurance cardio, do you mean training other than sprints... As in jogging?
                  Don't let anybody tell you, "You can't" just because they can't.

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                  • #10
                    I don't understand why liquid would give you a stitch.

                    Er yes, I'm talking about jogging. I used to get stitches a lot as a child. When I took up jogging about 14 years ago and finally managed to jog 400 m for the first time in my life, that's when I stopped getting stitches. Previously I'd had no problems with walking or cycling loads or even playing tennis for two hours - that's very stop-start. But previously I'd always struggled to jog continuously for 400 m, to the point of extreme exhaustion and pain. Actually, I'd never managed it. I always gave up at 300 m.
                    F 5 ft 3. HW: 196 lbs. Primal SW (May 2011): 182 lbs (42% BF)... W June '12: 160 lbs (29% BF) (UK size 12, US size 8). GW: ~24% BF - have ditched the scales til I fit into a pair of UK size 10 bootcut jeans. Currently aligning towards 'The Perfect Health Diet' having swapped some fat for potatoes.

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                    • #11
                      Ummm... Suck it up for the ~15 seconds of your sprint?

                      If you are running more than 20 seconds, then you probably aren't sprinting.

                      If you are running more than 20 seconds, switch your breathing to the opposite foot. Not sure why, but it seems to work.

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                      • #12
                        I always sprint before breakfast so I am normally at about 10 hours fasted, never had a stitch from sprinting. I thought sprinting used the gylogen already stored in your liver, so no need to carb load before as long as you haven't sprinted for a few days (I go weekly) or so and arn't SRLC (Stupid ridiculous low carb like eating only meat) you glycogen stores should have replensied.
                        You know all those pictures of Adam and Eve where they have belly button? Think about it..................... take as long as you need........................

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by paleo-bunny View Post
                          It's caused by a build-up of lactic acid in the liver when the muscles are using anaerobic respiration for energy. This can be prevented by improving cardiovascular fitness. Also if you eat within a few hours prior to exercise, your liver will still be working on processing metabolites from the meal, so it won't be able to recycle the lactic acid back to glucose via the Cori cycle so quickly as it would in a fasted state, and this can cause the stitch.
                          First the etiology of stitches is unknown, and most likely more than one. How exactly is lactic acid in the liver going to cause a localized muscle spasm in the abdominal wall? And how is it that you get get a cramp immediately after you start running, well before any lactic acid can build up?

                          Most common known causes are bad posture (which causes bad breathing) when running, and having excess matter in the stomach. Think about extra junk bouncing around in there.

                          While being conditioned helps prevent stitches, it does not cure them just makes it far less likely. To fix some posture stuff I've had to work on keeping my shoulders and hands down when I get tired, which helps with correct breathing. And not drinking within about 30 mins, other than a small sip or two.
                          Last edited by Wanderlust; 06-25-2012, 03:52 AM.
                          "Go For Broke"
                          Fat Kine-230/24% @ 6'2"
                          Small Kine-168/9%
                          Now- 200/8%
                          Goal- 210/6%

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by jfreaksho View Post
                            If you are running more than 20 seconds, then you probably aren't sprinting.
                            Um no, a sprint is when you are exceeding your aerobic threshold. For classification races under 1500m are considered sprints. Believe me when I'm doing 800m sprints, they are indeed sprints.
                            "Go For Broke"
                            Fat Kine-230/24% @ 6'2"
                            Small Kine-168/9%
                            Now- 200/8%
                            Goal- 210/6%

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Mine would go away if i switched my breathing steps. If I was getting a stitch when starting to inhale while stepping with my left foot, if i made sure to start my inhale while stepping with my right foot it would go away
                              I didn't like the rules you gave me, so I made some of my own.

                              Strong people are harder to kill than weak people, and more useful in general. - Mark Rippetoe

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