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PB fitness schedule made by Mark

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  • PB fitness schedule made by Mark

    I'm a little unclear as to why Mark chose to plan "lift heavy things" only 2x per week. Assuming that the heavy thing you are lifting is your own body weight, and not pushing around some boulder or lifting heavy free weights, why would he limit the pull ups/push ups/squat stuff? Based on his idea, Grok would likely have done those things everyday throughout the day as he climbed trees, squatted for barious things, scaled mountain sides, etc. Sprinting is also limited, but Grok likely sprinted at least once each day.

    That being said, my concern is overtraining yet I want to get stronger faster. I get the importance of rest days, and I'm looking to avoid inflammation and stress as much as possible for adrenal fatigue. But couldn't I do the lift heavy things cycle more often and sprint more often for faster results as long as I rest? Or will I not benefit from that? I haven't been doing it long, so I have nothing to measure results by. I do know that even though I'm still doing modified versions of the exercises, I feel stronger in other activities like golf. I used to feel like a cooked noodle when I held a club.

    So, what can I do to maximize or speed things along? I'm ready to get serious about it. I wouldn't mind beating my husband at golf as a side effect.
    Don't let anybody tell you, "You can't" just because they can't.

  • #2
    true, grok would have been wayyyy more active than most people are today, but it would have been spread out more too. he wouldn't be lifting heavy things for a straight hour, or doing repeat sprint routines...he would do these things only once or twice as necessary. the point of lifting only a couple of times a week is to put in a lot of work in a short time (since we generally have things like work and stuff that get in the way of mimicking grok completely) and for recovery...which is when you actually get stronger.
    if you don't work or have a job that allows a lot of movement, you can definitely spread that work out a lot more. lots and lots of walking is probably the best way to emulate grok, but throw in some sprints and tree climbing and boulder (car) pushing whenever it strikes you. i don't know that it would help you reach your goals any faster though.

    want to get lean and kick ass? keep your food primal, sleep well, lift heavy, sprint, and rest.
    http://www.marksdailyapple.com/forum/thread60178.html

    Comment


    • #3
      I find the book linked below to be an awesome and challenging workout. After the first couple weeks, I was in teh rhythm and love it.

      http://www.amazon.com/You-Are-Your-O...e+your+own+gym

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by Jiigigaw View Post
        I find the book linked below to be an awesome and challenging workout. After the first couple weeks, I was in teh rhythm and love it.

        Amazon.com: You Are Your Own Gym: The Bible of Bodyweight Exercises (9780345528582): Mark Lauren, Joshua Clark: Books
        Armed with Mark Lauren’s motivation techniques, expert training, and nutrition advice, you’ll see rapid results by working out just thirty minutes a day, four times a week—whether in your living room, yard, garage, hotel room, or office...

        Is that not too much?
        Don't let anybody tell you, "You can't" just because they can't.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by GeorgiaPeach View Post
          That being said, my concern is overtraining yet I want to get stronger faster. I get the importance of rest days, and I'm looking to avoid inflammation and stress as much as possible for adrenal fatigue. But couldn't I do the lift heavy things cycle more often and sprint more often for faster results as long as I rest? Or will I not benefit from that?
          I think -- and this is a total assumption here-- Mark made his 2x guideline as a benchmark for those inexperienced so they don't overtrain. In reality growth and progress are purely based on recovery. If you recover faster than the normal person, lift more often. If you recover slower, cry yourself to sleep.

          I recover fast, so I train 5 days a week as heavy as I can manage, and I've made calculated gains consistently.

          Because of how we eat, move, and live everyone is different, thus making it impossible to have a strict guideline for everyone to follow. Trust your own body.
          I've got of one them journal thingies. One Night At McCool's

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by NicMcCool View Post
            I think -- and this is a total assumption here-- Mark made his 2x guideline as a benchmark for those inexperienced so they don't overtrain. In reality growth and progress are purely based on recovery. If you recover faster than the normal person, lift more often. If you recover slower, cry yourself to sleep.

            I recover fast, so I train 5 days a week as heavy as I can manage, and I've made calculated gains consistently.

            Because of how we eat, move, and live everyone is different, thus making it impossible to have a strict guideline for everyone to follow. Trust your own body.
            For faster recovery, I kow to eat protein right after a workout, but what about rest days? Do heavy protein rest days speed recovery?
            Don't let anybody tell you, "You can't" just because they can't.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by GeorgiaPeach View Post
              For faster recovery, I kow to eat protein right after a workout, but what about rest days? Do heavy protein rest days speed recovery?
              Honestly I eat the same amount of protein day in and day out. The only thing that changes are the sources. This totally works for me.

              Someone with more macronutrient knowledge should chime in on this.
              I've got of one them journal thingies. One Night At McCool's

              Comment


              • #8
                From Mark's perspective he was probably writing about the least you can do to still get physical benefits, not the most you can do without over-training.

                That'd go down a lot better than recommending people sprint 4x weekly, lift heavy things 5x and walk 20 hours a week.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Paul Wade suggests 2 days a week in his "Convict Conditioning" as well. In the "Super FAQ" he goes into some more detail as to why; check it out.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by mike_h View Post
                    That'd go down a lot better than recommending people sprint 4x weekly, lift heavy things 5x and walk 20 hours a week.
                    With that in mind, what if I did a 3x a week workout that covered all my bases: walk to warm up, sprint to get my muscles going, then do the lift heavy things workout?

                    Side note: I don't want to lose weight, just get stronger. Sculpting is good, but I need to keep some of my female fat.
                    Don't let anybody tell you, "You can't" just because they can't.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by BamaAla View Post
                      Paul Wade suggests 2 days a week in his "Convict Conditioning" as well. In the "Super FAQ" he goes into some more detail as to why; check it out.
                      I can't find a legit link for this on google. Everything is "free downloads" but require membership stuff.
                      Don't let anybody tell you, "You can't" just because they can't.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        More is not better when it comes to exercise! The right amount is best. Simply doing more does not mean you will get stronger faster. It doesn't work that way. You must recover locally (the muscles worked) then systemically and then after all that has taken place if all else is optimal, then growth takes place. Training before all of this takes place will short circuit the process and progress will be minimal or non existent. Carried on too far, regression is next along with chronic fatigue. There are few easier ways to trash your adrenal glands than to workout more than is required. In really extreme cases it can takes months of no training whatsoever to recover systemically from the adrenal burnout.
                        If you are training with true intensity doing full body routines, two times is more than enough and a lot of people would do better on once a week. Increasing your frequency then adding even more HIIT sessions is a prescription for disaster. You won't be able to do it for very long. Your motivation will drop off quickly. Its quality, not quantity.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Let me address a couple of ideas here. One, Grok may or may not have sprinted and lifted everyday. Evidence from modern hunter gatherers suggests that he didn't. But what Grok had to do to survive, every day since childhood, is not necessarily the same thing that a modern middle aged person should do to get into Grok-shape.
                          Full-time fitness experts recommend everything from once per week (Body By Science) to every day or 6 days a week (Power To The People). What we know is: You get fitter during the rest periods, not during the workouts. If you don't have enough rest, you won't get fitter. How much rest YOU need is an unknown. Twice a week seems to work really great for most people. It works great for me, and the exercise I do, but so does three or four if the sessions are more varied and not always 100% intense. YMMV, that's the main point. Also, don't second-guess programs. Just do them for a few months, then once you have evidence of how they work or don't for YOU, tweak as needed.
                          If you are new to the PB - please ignore ALL of this stuff, until you've read the book, or at least http://www.marksdailyapple.com/primal-blueprint-101/ and this (personal fave): http://www.archevore.com/get-started/

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Yeah, I don't think Grok's life was as strenuous as some people would like to believe. There was probably a lot more walking, but the stuff that everybody wants to imagine as being so strenuous and time-consuming probably wasn't. I remember seeing on 60 minutes some hunter-gatherers who lived near the sea. Hungry? Took the guy about 2 minutes to spear a fish. The Indians up in Nor Cal still are allowed to scoop salmon up with nets. All you have to do is stand there at a bottleneck and scoop the fish as they fly up out of the water. I also recently saw a video on a website for a special lightweight fishing pole. To catch a fish took less effort than it takes me to push a cart around a supermarket. Considering that Grok's world probably had way more wildlife than ours, I think that he didn't work as hard as a lot of these guys pumping huge heavy weights and pushing truck tires up hills and such. Here's the fishing video.
                            Tenkara USA

                            Anyway, as an older woman trying to get in shape after a long life of mostly only doing cardio things like hiking, bike riding and jogging, I struggle against my inability to do more. Even just doing body weight exercise, twice a week is plenty. I end up spending 4 days a week sore just from that. I've seen real improvements doing only twice a week. The sprinting, I'd love to do it more than once a week but I'm sore for a few days from the sprinting. So basically I'm sore almost every day. At least it's not always the same body parts that are sore so I can go ahead and do whatever's next up on my schedule.
                            Female, 5'3", 50, Max squat: 202.5lbs. Max deadlift: 225 x 3.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Forever Young View Post
                              More is not better when it comes to exercise! The right amount is best. Simply doing more does not mean you will get stronger faster. It doesn't work that way. You must recover locally (the muscles worked) then systemically and then after all that has taken place if all else is optimal, then growth takes place. Training before all of this takes place will short circuit the process and progress will be minimal or non existent. Carried on too far, regression is next along with chronic fatigue. There are few easier ways to trash your adrenal glands than to workout more than is required. In really extreme cases it can takes months of no training whatsoever to recover systemically from the adrenal burnout.
                              If you are training with true intensity doing full body routines, two times is more than enough and a lot of people would do better on once a week. Increasing your frequency then adding even more HIIT sessions is a prescription for disaster. You won't be able to do it for very long. Your motivation will drop off quickly. Its quality, not quantity.
                              I have adrenal fatigue. Will I not get stronger locally as long as I'm weak systematically? Is that how that works?
                              Don't let anybody tell you, "You can't" just because they can't.

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