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  • #16
    Originally posted by JeffC View Post
    If it is uncomfortable that some joint pain ensues during swings, then I would not them. If this is not the case, then swings (I'm not talking about getups or presses) with a 10lb weight is really extremely light. My six year old daughter (about 50lbs) can pick up in deadlift form my 35lb kettlebell for multiple reps and can hold in a rack an 18lb one, with barely any coaching from me--she is too young for swings though. 10lbs is so close to so many things one has to port around in life (a gallon of milk, a jug of laundry detergent, bag of groceries, two bottles of wine, heck my youngest daughter weighted 8lbs when she was born, etc.) that if you have problems with that I would be concerned about that there may be some other issues, possibly endocrinological, holding you back.
    I've stopped doing kettlebell swings, as I stated. I can carry a heavy bag of shopping weighing 10 lbs no problem because that doesn't involve dynamic movement in my joints. I have big strong muscles and weak joints. You missed my point entirely.
    F 5 ft 3. HW: 196 lbs. Primal SW (May 2011): 182 lbs (42% BF)... W June '12: 160 lbs (29% BF) (UK size 12, US size 8). GW: ~24% BF - have ditched the scales til I fit into a pair of UK size 10 bootcut jeans. Currently aligning towards 'The Perfect Health Diet' having swapped some fat for potatoes.

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    • #17
      Originally posted by Rasputina View Post
      why does it bother you so much that I want to start with 10 lbs? I do have recurring tendonitis, and wear a brace when performing repetitive movements. Are you a doctor? My doc is the one who recommended I take it easy. It's my body, not yours.
      Same here re: tendonitis, with my tennis elbow. You are wise to be cautious.
      F 5 ft 3. HW: 196 lbs. Primal SW (May 2011): 182 lbs (42% BF)... W June '12: 160 lbs (29% BF) (UK size 12, US size 8). GW: ~24% BF - have ditched the scales til I fit into a pair of UK size 10 bootcut jeans. Currently aligning towards 'The Perfect Health Diet' having swapped some fat for potatoes.

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      • #18
        This is where I trained for over 2 years with the KBs. I now train on my own thanks to them. Very informative, and good people. Check out the DVDs if you're looking into something like that. Stay light to start for sure:-) They will certainly help your tendonitis, and improve core strength/flexibility greatly. Good luck, and Rock out with your Grok out!

        SKOGG System - SKOGG Gym
        Free your mind, and your Grok will follow!

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        • #19
          Originally posted by Rasputina View Post
          How many times per week would you recommend a kettlebell workout? I'm starting with 10lbs. I'm thinking of taking it to the park during my hour lunch break and using it there.
          Hi, Rasputina.

          Training protocols would vary according to individual circumstances. It appears you are a relative beginner, so I would suggest two days on, two days off (one day up to 75% of HRM; the other exceed this.) Rest and recovery being as an important part of exercise as the work (And I believe this to be consonant with Primal protocols.)

          It is a good thing to start with a weight with which you are comfortable, and isn't too heavy; at least until you have the form dialed-in. (It is my experience, as an instructor, that what are suggested as ideal starting weights for men and women (16kg and 8kg, respectively) vary according to mastery of technique as much as prior levels of fitness.) As far as technique is concerned, it is important to have access to an instructor or at least video tutorials from those who know their stuff (In this regard I would suggest Steve Cotter's 'Encyclopedia of Kettlebell Lifting. Vol.1.)* For example, it appeared to me that on the video tutorial of the crossfit swings the kettlebell was being 'muscled' up (This was my perception and I'm open to be mistaken.)

          With regard to aching arms; this is not unusual, for kettlebell swings take a toll on the grip, and thus the forearms and what is connected to them (This is covered in this tutorial by Valery Fedorenko (A Master of Sport (Russian Kettlebell Honours.) Towards the end of the tutorial it is possible to appreciate that the swing is not strictly a lower-body exercise (though, it is true that this is commonly the case.) Valery shows how using shoulder/upperback activation helps build into the snatch.)

          All the best.

          *I obtained my IKFF (levels I & II) certification under Steve Cotter, a number of years ago. This is not why I suggest his work. I believe that Cotter's work is the most thorough introduction to KB lifting for the beginner. (Other material that is available includes; the youtube channel of Valery Fedorenko (that I have linked above), Denis Kanygin's 'Systema' DVDs/website (though, excellent and detailed these two are more for those into girovoy/kettlebell sport) and Coach Sonnon's 'Official Kettlebell Foundation' DVDs.
          Last edited by pdjesson; 06-16-2012, 09:59 PM.
          All the best!

          PDJ

          The quieter you become the more you're able to hear.

          Mawlana Jalaludin Rumi

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          • #20
            Originally posted by Rasputina View Post
            why does it bother you so much that I want to start with 10 lbs? I do have recurring tendonitis, and wear a brace when performing repetitive movements. Are you a doctor? My doc is the one who recommended I take it easy. It's my body, not yours.
            I've been doing kettlebells for 4 years and read a lot of books and materials. The primary benefit from kettlebells is explosive full body ballistic work like swings, snatches, and cleans that the kettlebell's form makes possible--it's very hard to do a snatch or swing with a dumbbell. Grinding movements (like presses and getups) while beneficial can be replicated with a 10lb dumbbell or other weight. In order to be effective, many suggest that full body ballistic movements need to be done with a certain weight relative to body weight. For this reason, most suggest that average women start with an 8kg weight.

            The main manufacturer in the US of competition style kettlebells for the oldest style of KB lifting called girevoy sport does not even sell KB for women below 8kg. Check it out here: Kettlebells - VF Performance - Women - World Kettlebell Club Store
            Many women that train use two 8kg KBs for moves like jerks and push presses, of course they use one for snatches. Many purists might cynically suggest that very small KBs are a marketing fad used to gain from the proliferation of KB in more mainstream areas.

            It's a free world where we live and you can do whatever you want. Because of the core benefit of KBs being ballistic moves and the corresponding need to have a certain KB to body weight ratio, I suggested a heavier weight to benefit, a view which I believe is entirely consistent and supported with the overwhelming body of evidence I have encountered in my study of kettlebells over the past few years.

            No I am not a doctor. When you post on a forum and ask for advice and get it, why do you upset?
            Last edited by JeffC; 06-17-2012, 07:12 AM.

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            • #21
              Originally posted by JeffC View Post
              I've been doing kettlebells for 4 years and read a lot of books and materials. The primary benefit from kettlebells is explosive full body ballistic work like swings, snatches, and cleans that the kettlebell's form makes possible--it's very hard to do a snatch or swing with a dumbbell. Grinding movements (like presses and getups) while beneficial can be replicated with a 10lb dumbbell or other weight. In order to be effective, many suggest that full body ballistic movements need to be done with a certain weight relative to body weight. For this reason, most suggest that average women start with an 8kg weight.

              The main manufacturer in the US of competition style kettlebells for the oldest style of KB lifting called girevoy sport does not even sell KB for women below 8kg. Check it out here: Kettlebells - VF Performance - Women - World Kettlebell Club Store
              Many women that train use two 8kg KBs for moves like jerks and push presses, of course they use one for snatches. Many purists might cynically suggest that very small KBs are a marketing fad used to gain from the proliferation of KB in more mainstream areas.

              It's a free world where we live and you can do whatever you want. Because of the core benefit of KBs being ballistic moves and the corresponding need to have a certain KB to body weight ratio, I suggested a heavier weight to benefit, a view which I believe is entirely consistent and supported with the overwhelming body of evidence I have encountered in my study of kettlebells over the past few years.

              No I am not a doctor. When you post on a forum and ask for advice and get it, why do you upset?
              Never, in my question did I ask for advice on the weight of my kettlebells, you took it upon yourself to tell me mine were to light. My question was asking about frequency of workouts.

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              • #22
                Originally posted by pace2race View Post
                I think that would depend on your recovery. You could use it every lift day if you're not sore or do different lifts each workout day with it. They're so versatile. From swings to snatches to pushups, there's all sorts of different ways you can change it up with them.
                I agree...your let your recovery time drive the frequency.

                Be mindful that this can change/vary over time, based on your strength gains and the intensity of your workouts.

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                • #23
                  Originally posted by Rasputina View Post
                  Never, in my question did I ask for advice on the weight of my kettlebells, you took it upon yourself to tell me mine were to light. My question was asking about frequency of workouts.
                  Just to play devils advocate - the relative weight of your kettlebell an important factor when it comes to the frequency of your workouts so it's a pretty valid question.

                  I think the general theme is that you should be lifting heavier (this is of course relative to your current ability and a range of other factors) and less frequently.
                  Sandbag Training For MMA & Combat Sports
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                  • #24
                    Originally posted by Coach Palfrey View Post
                    Just to play devils advocate - the relative weight of your kettlebell an important factor when it comes to the frequency of your workouts so it's a pretty valid question.

                    I think the general theme is that you should be lifting heavier (this is of course relative to your current ability and a range of other factors) and less frequently.
                    I suppose you missed the part about my tendonitis?

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                    • #25
                      Originally posted by Rasputina View Post
                      I suppose you missed the part about my tendonitis?
                      You're far more likely to aggravate a tendonitis condition with a higher volume, lighter weight repetitive movement than a heavier weight, lower volume movement.
                      Sandbag Training For MMA & Combat Sports
                      Sandbag Training Guide on Kindle
                      The Complete Guide To Sandbag Training
                      Brute Force Sandbags
                      www.facebook.com/sandbagfitness
                      http://fitedia.com/ - Health and Fitness eBooks, video, audio and workshops

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                      • #26
                        I'm sticking with the 10lbs. I will move up when I'm ready. Thanks for your concern.

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                        • #27
                          I actually wasn't suggesting you move up weight at all. That was the other guy.
                          Sandbag Training For MMA & Combat Sports
                          Sandbag Training Guide on Kindle
                          The Complete Guide To Sandbag Training
                          Brute Force Sandbags
                          www.facebook.com/sandbagfitness
                          http://fitedia.com/ - Health and Fitness eBooks, video, audio and workshops

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                          • #28
                            Originally posted by Rasputina View Post
                            No, trust me, 10lbs, is plenty heavy for me!! My wrists are so small that I can wrap my fingers around one, with two inches to spare. My legs are strong, my arms are weak sticks!
                            Kettlebells are mostly lower body and core - you will quickly outgrow a 10 pounder. I've outgrown my 18 pound and use a 22 and 26 pound one regularly - I swing 35 pounds.
                            Christine
                            Wag more, bark less

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                            • #29
                              10 lbs is very light for a KB. You won't feel it on anything save for a Turkish get-up or some sick 100x100 of the overhead snatches. However, it is a good weight for you to learn the moves without hurting yourself.

                              Normally, when you train with KBs, just like with dumbbells and bars and anything else, you need a range of weights for any lift to find the range where the challenge is there, but the hurt is not.

                              3x a week is a good start for KB, try to see if your local library has a book called Kettlebell Training for Athlets, it is by far the best KB book I have seen.
                              Last edited by Leida; 06-18-2012, 05:47 AM.
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                              • #30
                                I did my first kettlebell workout yesterday, with my 10lbs, I am slightly sore this morning. I was challenging for me, but fun.

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