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Can crossfit get you jacked?

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  • Can crossfit get you jacked?

    I see a lot of people slim down and get lean/cut from crossfit, but can you get cut and put on muscle too? Do they taylor the program to meet those kinds of needs if that's what you desire?

  • #2
    There's all kinds of Cfit, it's not one thing, kind of like asking if 24 hour fitness can get you jacked.
    If you are new to the PB - please ignore ALL of this stuff, until you've read the book, or at least http://www.marksdailyapple.com/primal-blueprint-101/ and this (personal fave): http://www.archevore.com/get-started/

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    • #3
      Jacked? As in injured?

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      • #4
        yeowch.

        one of my friends has a bulging disc from cross fit. sad, really.

        form is everything, no matter what system you're using. cross fit works. so do many other methods.

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        • #5
          I don' thing that word means what you thing it means.
          Jacked means messed-up, injured.

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          • #6
            try something like crossfit football. focuses more on strength training, and uses a trackable progression system. and on a more positive note, it doesn't seem to be overrun by d-bags with fauxhawks and kneesocks doing kipping pullups

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            • #7
              Well that all depends on where the Xfit box is located. If it's in the inner city, you might get jacked...
              "The problem with quoting someone on the Internet is, you never know if it's legit" - Abraham Lincoln

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              • #8
                Sorry, by jacked I mean muscular. But as far as injuries go, is cross fit more prone to injury? I used to do P90X, which was great, then did Insanity but got injured from that so I want to avoid things that may injury me again.

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                • #9
                  Any athletic activity carries injury risk. More intense activities carry higher risk. Crossfit has had some people jump in on the craze who are running boxes with not enough training and the idea that you should always push as hard as you can as often as you can, with no significant attention to form or skill building. Other boxes have coaches that work to scale workouts and adapt training to people's needs, who watch for problems in form and correct it (even if it means stopping a person mid-WOD), and who have enough training and experience to know what they're doing.

                  I attend the second kind of gym, and we have weightlifting classes, an elite group for people who want to compete, regular WODs, open times where you can just come in and use the equipment how you want (with a coach around, but not a coached workout), and coaches who adapt the programming to work for a range of needs. For example, one of the staff who is a nationally certified lifting coach worked with my partner to develop a lifting program to fit in with his marathon training. But not every box offers this. We're also light on the fauxhawks (although now that I can climb the rope, I sort of understand the knee socks).

                  Do your research, talk to people at the gym (not just staff--chat with members), do a trial class, and don't feel like you have to stay somewhere that's not making you happy. Also, it's not a bodybuilding program or a powerlifting program (although some boxes offer lifting classes), so if you're asking for either of those from Crossfit, you're likely to be disappointed.
                  “If I didn't define myself for myself, I would be crunched into other people's fantasies for me and eaten alive.” --Audre Lorde

                  Owly's Journal

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                  • #10
                    Sounds like a good joint, owly.

                    It's always about the individuals doing the process.

                    Yoga is the same. Some teachers are crap and you're gonna get injured big time. Other teachers rock, and you're going to get the amazing bennies.

                    Cross fit -- and many other processes besides -- will get you muscular-jacked.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by elektro View Post
                      Sorry, by jacked I mean muscular. But as far as injuries go, is cross fit more prone to injury? I used to do P90X, which was great, then did Insanity but got injured from that so I want to avoid things that may injury me again.
                      Let me preface this with I have never done crossfit but I will say the program as a whole does have a reputation for injuries.
                      "The problem with quoting someone on the Internet is, you never know if it's legit" - Abraham Lincoln

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                      • #12
                        Crossfit fixed an injury I had by injuring the injury. I think.
                        You lousy kids! Get off my savannah!

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                        • #13
                          I think in Crossfit it is important to pay attention to form. particularly on the weight-lifting part. If you don't do your form
                          correctly you can get injured. Good form is more important that heavy weights
                          http://www.cantneverdidanything.net/

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                          • #14
                            One of my good friends fell on her tailbone about 10 days ago and really hurt herself. Total bummer. I took a class with her and it KILLED me. I couldn't move comfortably for 6 days or so. So while the workout kicked my butt, I was then inactive for the next week. Lots of ripped people at that gym though so it works!

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by primalswan View Post
                              Lots of ripped people at that gym though so it works!
                              Base rate fallacy. What about all the non-ripped people participating in crossfit?

                              And pro causa fallacy. Does crossfit actually produce the ripped people? Or, do people who are already ripped participate in crossfit?

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