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Study: High Circulating Oxidized LDL in Strength Trained Athletes

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  • Study: High Circulating Oxidized LDL in Strength Trained Athletes

    I found this study when I was doing some research for why my LDL has been increasing over the past couple years:


    http://www.google.com/url?sa=t&rct=j...K1GhvjSWfAWt6g

    It is a small study (9 athletes, 9 controls), but it shows a much higher level of oxidzed LDL in the athletes blood than in the sedantary peoples'. With no increase in free radical scavenging.

    One confounding factor is that the athlete mean BMI is 28 and the control is 21, so the sedantary people are leaner.

    I think this might be a good argument for not overdoing it with the strength training. I had been doing 4 pretty intense sessions each week for about a year while also fasting 16+ hours each day. I'm starting to think that moderation is the key to everything.

  • #2
    Lower BMI doesn't mean leaner, especially with regards to athletes.

    I'd assume the groups were of similar body fat percentage
    I didn't like the rules you gave me, so I made some of my own.

    Strong people are harder to kill than weak people, and more useful in general. - Mark Rippetoe

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    • #3
      arnold.PNG

      6’2” and 245 lbs., BMI= 31.5 (obese)
      "The problem with quoting someone on the Internet is, you never know if it's legit" - Abraham Lincoln

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      • #4
        Originally posted by Fernaldo View Post
        [ATTACH]7148[/ATTACH]

        6’2” and 245 lbs., BMI= 31.5 (obese)
        I get "morbidly obese" at 6'7" 280lbs, anything below 250 and I start to look gaunt. According to the BMI my "healthy" weight is like 210lbs
        I didn't like the rules you gave me, so I made some of my own.

        Strong people are harder to kill than weak people, and more useful in general. - Mark Rippetoe

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        • #5
          Agreed, I used the wrong term. I should have said.... smaller, I guess. BMI is a terrible gauge for pretty much anything. I was just pointing out that the control group's was lower, which could be a confounding variable. You're right that they were very likely skinny-fat since they were sedantary.

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          • #6
            They used powerlifters and shot putters. Those guys rarely eat that clean. I suspect their diet is a lot more responsible of these oxidized LDL particles than their training.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Winterbike View Post
              They used powerlifters and shot putters. Those guys rarely eat that clean. I suspect their diet is a lot more responsible of these oxidized LDL particles than their training.
              Possibly. There's no way of telling what either group was eating. Just that the athletes were probably eating a lot more since they had higher BMIs. It would have been a better study with a larger sample. Still, it's interesting to me. My LDL climbed a pretty good bit when I started lifting heavy 4x/week. At first I thought it was most certainly the large, fluffy benign kind, but now I'm not so sure.

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              • #8
                As the OP stated, moderation is always best in almost all things.

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                • #9
                  Also take into account the bodybuilding community is HUGE into whey/casein protein. Whey/casein protein has A LOT of oxidized cholesterol, and many bodybuilders take it 1-2 times a day or more. And then there are all the crazy blogs that BAKE with already-oxidized cholesterol, which makes it even worse. Basically, you have a group of guys eating a whole lot of food, often poor food choices to put on mass and purposefully consuming oxidized cholesterol several times a day as a protein source.

                  I gave up whey protein months ago and it was a great decision. Now, I just eat yogurt and cottage cheese. They have almost the same nutrient profile as whey protein (pure protein with very little fat or carbs), but it's a whole food with no oxidized cholesterol, and it keeps you full for a long time.
                  Don't put your trust in anyone on this forum, including me. You are the key to your own success.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by ChocoTaco369 View Post
                    Also take into account the bodybuilding community is HUGE into whey/casein protein. Whey/casein protein has A LOT of oxidized cholesterol, and many bodybuilders take it 1-2 times a day or more. And then there are all the crazy blogs that BAKE with already-oxidized cholesterol, which makes it even worse. Basically, you have a group of guys eating a whole lot of food, often poor food choices to put on mass and purposefully consuming oxidized cholesterol several times a day as a protein source.

                    I gave up whey protein months ago and it was a great decision. Now, I just eat yogurt and cottage cheese. They have almost the same nutrient profile as whey protein (pure protein with very little fat or carbs), but it's a whole food with no oxidized cholesterol, and it keeps you full for a long time.
                    This, plus if there are powerlifters, the chance of AAS being used by some of them approaches a certainty.
                    Lifting Journal

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                    • #11
                      Its an interesting pilot study, but obviously too many confounding variables to come up with any real insight.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by ChocoTaco369 View Post
                        Also take into account the bodybuilding community is HUGE into whey/casein protein. Whey/casein protein has A LOT of oxidized cholesterol, and many bodybuilders take it 1-2 times a day or more. And then there are all the crazy blogs that BAKE with already-oxidized cholesterol, which makes it even worse. Basically, you have a group of guys eating a whole lot of food, often poor food choices to put on mass and purposefully consuming oxidized cholesterol several times a day as a protein source.

                        But there's whey in yogurt as well right? Is that bad?
                        I gave up whey protein months ago and it was a great decision. Now, I just eat yogurt and cottage cheese. They have almost the same nutrient profile as whey protein (pure protein with very little fat or carbs), but it's a whole food with no oxidized cholesterol, and it keeps you full for a long time.
                        But there is whey in yogurt right?
                        well then

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Gadsie View Post
                          But there is whey in yogurt right?
                          Yes, there is some. Less in Greek yogurt as more of it has been strained off. But whey powder is liquid whey which has been dehydrated, which will oxidize the cholesterol. From what little I understand, some whey powder is produced more "gently" so it isn't as bad for you. Liquid whey is only a problem if you're intolerant to dairy proteins. Oxidized cholesterol ingestion is bad no matter who you are.

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