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  • Body By Science Work Out Reviews and Success Stories

    Hi, i have been primal now for just over a year and have gradually reduced and reduced the amount of exercise i have done over this time. me and my partner have now decided to give the body by science work out a go, its a specific work out of 5 exercises:

    row
    deadlift
    military press
    bench press
    squat

    you do them super slow and are timed doing so, it should take only 12 mins and a rest period of 7 -10 days after before you perform another work out.

    we have seen a lot of success stories from people and found that the results are really amazing, its also helps to reduce injuries of which i have had 2 quite long term ones in the past from over training.

    i would love to hear success stories or anyone else who is trying this out and what they think of it, i will post results later if anyone is interested

    lucy

  • #2
    Don't have any direct experience with it, but utilize the basic principle (per my understanding) which is prolongued static holds.

    I think it's a good program for people that a) don't want to spend too much time in the gym and b) are looking for a safe environment.

    I really don't have any gripes with it at all, but I could never make it the only thing I do because I just plain like to workout more often. I do heavy holds and super slow reps and can attest that they add to strength, I'm not particularly interested in finding THE absolute best way to workout though. I care more about what I actually enjoy doing at the gym, and BBS doesn't do it for me.

    Wish you much success with it though!
    I used to seriously post here, now I prefer to troll.

    Comment


    • #3
      This a version of what is known as high intensity training or HIT. The premise is very brief, intense and infrequent workouts allowing for complete recovery and optimal muscular growth. Many years of data confirms that most do best on about a once every 7 days schedule.

      I myself have been doing variations of HIT for many years. I've done high volume, lower intensity training as well in the past. Right now my conditioning program is very similar to BBS. I am doing pretty much the big 5 as they call it. It is a very effective system. The key is to do each exercise to absolute failure. The intensity level is extreme. It will take a little dialing in time to get the right weights and to make that mind muscle connection to truly grind everything possible out of the sets. If you do this right you will notice a huge jump in intensity a few weeks to month or so in. You will feel more gassed afterwards then you ever felt doing only 12 or so minutes of work. This will build on itself and your ability to train hard will increase.

      Done properly, you should see an increase in reps and or weight pretty much every single workout. Of course the recovery time must be sufficient and about a week should work.

      You are going to get varying opinions here. This topic has been debated here before. Some will try and discredit it. I don't care a bit about that. I've trained every damned way one can train and HIT, BBS works. Give it a try for a few months at least. I think you'll be surprised how much strength you gain. I do one session about once a week or so and I do one planned sprint interval session on about the same frequency. I do a good amount of walking for general fitness and well being. Occasionally I'll jog a mile or a bit more for the hell of it. When the weather is nice I spend lots of time outdoors being active in lots of other ways too. That is it! I feel absolutely great almost everyday. I literally spring out of bed in the morning. My poundages are going up every workout and my body composition has changed dramatically in only 2 months. I went through a major life change over the last year and things slipped a bit with my fitness. MID January I gained full control of things. In less than 2 months I've lost over 25 lbs of fat and gained considerable strength. My cardio conditioning is infinitely better than its been in years. I can run up several flights of stairs and hardly be winded. I'll be 47 in a couple months.

      Of course all of this is a combined effort of diet, HIT, HIIT, moving slowly frequently and plenty of rest. But HIT type training fits in very well with this and allows plenty of time to have fun in many many other ways.
      Last edited by Forever Young; 03-01-2012, 10:35 AM.

      Comment


      • #4
        What's interesting is you watch videos of Dr McGuff and he comes across like this is some new workout protocol. Mike Mentzer's Heavy Duty workout is basically the same exact thing with the same exact rest schedule. He was touting the efficacy of this workout in the 90's. Mentzer's is even more simplified. 4 exercises, 1 set each to failure.
        "The problem with quoting someone on the Internet is, you never know if it's legit" - Abraham Lincoln

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by lucyewok View Post
          you do them super slow and are timed doing so, it should take only 12 mins and a rest period of 7 -10 days after before you perform another work out.

          we have seen a lot of success stories from people and found that the results are really amazing, its also helps to reduce injuries of which i have had 2 quite long term ones in the past from over training.

          i would love to hear success stories or anyone else who is trying this out and what they think of it, i will post results later if anyone is interested

          lucy
          Two important aspects of the HIT workout itself is safety and effort. The slow and controlled movements enhances safety. For most people, the extraordinary effort is hard to gauge without a trainer. If you're training yourself, I'd recommend a HR monitor. You should work towards the suggested max heart rate, particularly for the leg workout. It's brutally hard work.

          Originally posted by Fernaldo View Post
          What's interesting is you watch videos of Dr McGuff and he comes across like this is some new workout protocol. Mike Mentzer's Heavy Duty workout is basically the same exact thing with the same exact rest schedule. He was touting the efficacy of this workout in the 90's. Mentzer's is even more simplified. 4 exercises, 1 set each to failure.
          Then you don't know the history very well. Dr. McGuff is fully aware of who Mike Mentzer is. John Little, co-author of BBS, was close friends with Mentzer. Menzter was trained by Arthur Jones who invented the Nautilus exercise equipment. Modern HIT traces back to Jones. Brief but intense workouts go as far back as old time strongmen like Sandow and Hackenschmidt.
          Last edited by js290; 03-01-2012, 10:15 PM.

          Comment


          • #6
            Machine based = waste of time
            Starting Strength or even Stronglifts much much better
            Eating primal is not a diet, it is a way of life.
            PS
            Don't forget to play!

            Comment


            • #7
              Starting Strength is working wonders for me. I believe the BBS approach is a good one too. Whatever fits your lifestyle and goals. I guess I would just imagine it would be MUCH easier to reach 3xbw on the deadlift with SS than BBS. But I could be wrong.
              KFCialis - It may be boneless...but you won't be! - Stephen Colbert

              My Powerlifting journal in preparation for my first meet - http://www.marksdailyapple.com/forum/thread54184.html

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by Dirlot View Post
                Machine based = waste of time
                Starting Strength or even Stronglifts much much better
                This is the kind of comment that makes me shake my head!

                Machine workouts are NOT a waste of time! Not only that but BBS can be done utilizing free weights. It is much safer though using machines. A good barbell routine concentrating on compound movements can be very effective. I've done them all. Don't just dismiss BBS because it is machine based. It works to be sure.

                \

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                • #9
                  Yes BBS is a variation of Mike Mentzer's Heavy Duty system. Mike's system was a variation of Arther Jones Nautilus system. I do my own version based on all of them to some degree utilizing the many high intensity techniques based on sticking points etc.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I just checked out BBS at the library a couple of weeks ago. Are you guys serious? There's hardly any science in there at all. The most controversial claims are backed by like two/three tiny underpowered studies. When I compare the evidence offered in that book in favor of machines and in favor of 7 day rest periods versus the dozens of training logs at startingstrength.com, I am rather underwhelmed to say the least. You have guys adding 10-15 lb weekly to their barbell squats for months on end and adding huge amounts of muscle mass on a program like SS.
                    I'm sure it works fine for people just stepping into the gym for the first time - that's what Rippetoe calls the novice effect at work. The one success story in that book - hell, I'M more of a success story than that, and in less time. I'm glad I read it though.
                    If you are new to the PB - please ignore ALL of this stuff, until you've read the book, or at least http://www.marksdailyapple.com/primal-blueprint-101/ and this (personal fave): http://www.archevore.com/get-started/

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Forever Young View Post
                      This is the kind of comment that makes me shake my head!

                      Machine workouts are NOT a waste of time! Not only that but BBS can be done utilizing free weights. It is much safer though using machines. A good barbell routine concentrating on compound movements can be very effective. I've done them all. Don't just dismiss BBS because it is machine based. It works to be sure.

                      \
                      Machine-based exercises are often problematic for me simply because of my height - being quite tall, the ranges of motion/seat positions on machines sometimes end up putting me in screwy positions. I was having some back/joint issues with machines that basically went away when switching to freeweights simply because I was no longer forcing my body into an awkward position - barbells/dumbbells allowed my body to move much more naturally.

                      That said, the basic premise behind BBS certainly can be applied to a variety of regimens.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        They spend about 1 page in the book explaining the main barbell lifts and how to apply them to the BBS protocol. They show a guy deadlifting about 65 lb which was good for some luls. The main claimed advantage of machines is that the difficulty can be kept constant over the full range of motion - which is interesting, but a) bands and chains do that for barbell lifts and are not even mentioned and b) picking up a barbell will always be more similar to, and hence more useful training for, picking up heavy shit in the real world.
                        If you are new to the PB - please ignore ALL of this stuff, until you've read the book, or at least http://www.marksdailyapple.com/primal-blueprint-101/ and this (personal fave): http://www.archevore.com/get-started/

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          My own version of HIT utilizes many methods. My workout for a period of time may be machines only like the BBS protocol. Then I will do one combining the two. Then its free weights only. This covers all the bases as I see it and keeps things fresh over the course of the year. Sometimes I utilize super slow for a month or two. Other times it explosive work. The one constant is the basic principles of HIT. Short intense workouts, appropriate rest between workouts.

                          I totally get that some find machines real awkward too. I am 5'-8" which is about average height. Machines are made to work best for the average sized person. Someone who is out of that range may find them inadequate and uncomfortable.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by js290 View Post
                            Two important aspects of the HIT workout itself is safety and effort. The slow and controlled movements enhances safety. For most people, the extraordinary effort is hard to gauge without a trainer. If you're training yourself, I'd recommend a HR monitor. You should work towards the suggested max heart rate, particularly for the leg workout. It's brutally hard work.

                            Then you don't know the history very well. Dr. McGuff is fully aware of who Mike Mentzer is. John Little, co-author of BBS, was close friends with Mentzer. Menzter was trained by Arthur Jones who invented the Nautilus exercise equipment. Modern HIT traces back to Jones. Brief but intense workouts go as far back as old time strongmen like Sandow and Hackenschmidt.

                            Good to know. I admit I am not familiar with McGuff's history or Arthur Jones, so that's just me being a jackass. I was just watching a McGuff video and noticed he started talking about what sounded like Mentzer crap.

                            I bought the BBS kindle edition last night for educational purposes. Just the discussion on metabolism was worth the cost of the book IMO.
                            "The problem with quoting someone on the Internet is, you never know if it's legit" - Abraham Lincoln

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Fernaldo View Post
                              I bought the BBS kindle edition last night for educational purposes. Just the discussion on metabolism was worth the cost of the book IMO.
                              I felt the exact same way. Most people go looking at the Big Five Workout completely missing the chapter on metabolism which described to me why I should exercise. Once you understand they why, it's easier to figure out the how.

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