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  • #16
    Originally posted by Jomp View Post
    CC is a bit like Primal, there is a lot more to it than just getting strong if you really take what Paul says to heart. Been on it for three months and i have never ever been this consistent with any program before. It makes it simple to succeed.

    Stronger, yes
    More muscular, yes
    Relaxed attitude towards training, yes
    Loosing weight, yes (Due to the very obvious constraint this is to progress)
    Injuries, no
    Having fun, hell yeah

    If you are looking for a quick fix, don't bother. The program, as any serious strength program, is about time and consistency.
    Start from step 1 and dont stress it
    Read and understand the book
    Use your head
    Dont stop

    Good luck!
    Thank you for the feedback Jomp. This is great info. I'm not looking for a quick fix, I'm looking for long term strength without injury. So far this is sounds like a great system.
    "You have succeeded in life when all you really want is only what you really need." ~ Vernon Howard

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    • #17
      Originally posted by JVib View Post
      Wow! That is fantastic. How long have you been following the routine? And are you at some of the higher levels?
      March or April 2011 I started PBF with CC for my lifting of heavy things. The combination of the sprinting, walking, and CC built up my knees and back to a healthy point. My Fitness test from October 2010 I scored about a 220 or so, out of 300 points. October 2011 I scored just over 270. My run time dropped by about two minutes, for a two-mile run from about 15:50+ to 13:59. My max pushups went from about 60 to over 70, situps about the same. I'm hoping to max out that test this year. I'm pretty close on my pushups and situps, but I have about 45 seconds to find somewhere in my two-mile run.

      I am stepping back down a couple levels right now. I pushed through some levels faster than I should have, and ended up plateauing in some exercises.
      I'm at close pushups (Level 6), hanging knee raises (6), the first three levels of HSPU (I haven't met the standards for the crow stand or the Handstand, but I'm working both). I'm on Level 4 for bridges, up to the top of my head. I'm on close squats (Level 6), or half uneven squats (Level 6.75?), depending on how I feel. Pullups I just backed down to Aussie/horizontal pulls (Level 2) and assisted pullups (level 3), because I wasn't progressing from full pullups, and I've realized there's more to work there, specifically my forearms and grip.

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      • #18
        Originally posted by JVib View Post
        Thank you for the feedback Jomp. This is great info. I'm not looking for a quick fix, I'm looking for long term strength without injury. So far this is sounds like a great system.
        Sounds like you have the right mindset for CC. I'm sure you will like it. Apart from CC and CC2 I also found Naked Warrior (Pavel) to be a great complement to CC. Not for the programming, but for the tension and breathing techniques. Great stuff. Amazing how much there is to learn and gain from working a few very basic movements. Less is more

        About CC2: I think it's ok if you want to add in a few stuff from that book from the start (or maybe a few weeks in), as long as you are not reading and thinking instead of working out
        I've added grip training and of course the Trifecta to my workouts and I will be adding in calf and neck training, but probably on a more on a "when I feel like it" or Greasing the Groove basis .

        I try to get three work out's a week, where I alternate the following
        Work-out 1: Push-ups, Leg raises, Grip (Hang)
        Work-out 2: Pull-up's, Squat, Grip (Finger tip)

        My work-out's have the following format
        Warm-up:
        Jump rope, run, row etc
        Easier versions of the exercises in the work set's
        Trifecta
        Work-set's
        Pull-up's push-up's etc. as progressed
        Play
        Here I add stuff that I think is fun and want to try out. Like harder versions of the big four, hand balancing, learning kettlebell snatch etc.

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        • #19
          Originally posted by Jomp View Post
          Sounds like you have the right mindset for CC. I'm sure you will like it. Apart from CC and CC2 I also found Naked Warrior (Pavel) to be a great complement to CC. Not for the programming, but for the tension and breathing techniques. Great stuff. Amazing how much there is to learn and gain from working a few very basic movements. Less is more

          About CC2: I think it's ok if you want to add in a few stuff from that book from the start (or maybe a few weeks in), as long as you are not reading and thinking instead of working out
          I've added grip training and of course the Trifecta to my workouts and I will be adding in calf and neck training, but probably on a more on a "when I feel like it" or Greasing the Groove basis .

          I try to get three work out's a week, where I alternate the following
          Work-out 1: Push-ups, Leg raises, Grip (Hang)
          Work-out 2: Pull-up's, Squat, Grip (Finger tip)

          My work-out's have the following format
          Warm-up:
          Jump rope, run, row etc
          Easier versions of the exercises in the work set's
          Trifecta
          Work-set's
          Pull-up's push-up's etc. as progressed
          Play
          Here I add stuff that I think is fun and want to try out. Like harder versions of the big four, hand balancing, learning kettlebell snatch etc.
          Thank you so much for all the information.
          "You have succeeded in life when all you really want is only what you really need." ~ Vernon Howard

          Comment


          • #20
            I love both editions of CC,they're some of the best books on progressive calisthenics I've found out there.Once you get CC1 nailed down you can start adding in stuff from CC2 which deals more with grip,forearm,calf,and lateral chain strength than the first book.Another great book on calisthenics is Pavel's "The Naked Warrior",which has a lot of great tips on increasing your strength fairly quickly using just your own body.

            When I started CC is I was pretty out of shape but in the two months I've started doing it I've dropped weight,built muscle,gained flexibility,and my back pain from an old mma injury is gone. It's worth mentioning that using the CC series and TNW has increased the power of my strikes significantly,to the point that I had to throw down the cash for a heavier bag since my old one was moving way too much from my strikes to provide a proper workout. I also believe that progressive calisthenics is one of the best way to build overall strength,fitness,and coordination because it teaches a higher level of awareness for your body and it's capabilities,and also teaches you how to use your muscles together in a natural way. Progressive calisthenics are also very safe when done properly and can actually help heal and protect the body. Doing BW squats strengthened my posterior chain and helped rid me of chronic lower back pain,which is a blessing for me considering I'm an active person who doesn't have time to favor a busted back.
            Believe nothing, no matter where you read it, or who has said it, no matter if I have said it, unless it agrees with your own reason and your own experience.

            In the mind of the beginner, there are many possibilities; in the mind of the expert, there are few.


            I've shaken hands with a raccoon and lived to tell the tale

            SW: 220- 225 pounds at the beginning of January
            CW: 180 pounds

            Goals for 2012: Lose a bit more fat and start a serious muscle and strength routine

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            • #21
              Originally posted by @lex View Post
              I love both editions of CC,they're some of the best books on progressive calisthenics I've found out there.Once you get CC1 nailed down you can start adding in stuff from CC2 which deals more with grip,forearm,calf,and lateral chain strength than the first book.Another great book on calisthenics is Pavel's "The Naked Warrior",which has a lot of great tips on increasing your strength fairly quickly using just your own body.

              When I started CC is I was pretty out of shape but in the two months I've started doing it I've dropped weight,built muscle,gained flexibility,and my back pain from an old mma injury is gone. It's worth mentioning that using the CC series and TNW has increased the power of my strikes significantly,to the point that I had to throw down the cash for a heavier bag since my old one was moving way too much from my strikes to provide a proper workout. I also believe that progressive calisthenics is one of the best way to build overall strength,fitness,and coordination because it teaches a higher level of awareness for your body and it's capabilities,and also teaches you how to use your muscles together in a natural way. Progressive calisthenics are also very safe when done properly and can actually help heal and protect the body. Doing BW squats strengthened my posterior chain and helped rid me of chronic lower back pain,which is a blessing for me considering I'm an active person who doesn't have time to favor a busted back.
              Thank you for the response @lex. I've looked at The Naked Warrior on amazon and I have it on my wish list. It is $21 for the kindle edition..do you feel it's worth the $?
              I have some shoulder and knee pain. I'm hoping this workout routine will rid me of them.
              "You have succeeded in life when all you really want is only what you really need." ~ Vernon Howard

              Comment


              • #22
                Because of this thread I picked up CC on kindle, I tore through it in two days, and now I'm on my way!

                I'm not impressive with it at all, and I'm taking Wade's advice, and going very slow with it, as I've not done ANY kind of exercising in the past few years. But, I can already do 20 wall pushups, and 5 leg raises. Keep in mind, I'm 250ish pounds, and not used to working out at all!
                Down from 275 to 250!
                Werewolf Primal Living Blog - http://lycanthropology.com
                Some fact, a lot of fiction! Keep track of my progress there!

                Comment


                • #23
                  Originally posted by Westly View Post
                  Because of this thread I picked up CC on kindle, I tore through it in two days, and now I'm on my way!

                  I'm not impressive with it at all, and I'm taking Wade's advice, and going very slow with it, as I've not done ANY kind of exercising in the past few years. But, I can already do 20 wall pushups, and 5 leg raises. Keep in mind, I'm 250ish pounds, and not used to working out at all!
                  I felt the same way. The initial stages are very easy. But, I'm going to stick with it until I reach the higher levels.
                  I can imagine that one handed pushups, chinup and one leg squats are going to be MUCH more difficult.
                  It seems that they want you to work your way up very slowly so your tendon/ligament strength gains keep up with your muscle strength gains.
                  "You have succeeded in life when all you really want is only what you really need." ~ Vernon Howard

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                  • #24
                    Yeah, and I very much need to do that. I've got bad knees, so I'm sure the knee stuff will keep me working longer than the arm things. I expect to progress slowly, and I'm perfectly okay with that!! As long as I feel that I'm doing my best, and challenging myself, I'm satisfied.
                    Down from 275 to 250!
                    Werewolf Primal Living Blog - http://lycanthropology.com
                    Some fact, a lot of fiction! Keep track of my progress there!

                    Comment


                    • #25
                      Originally posted by Dirlot View Post
                      CC2 is not about the big 6 but things like grip strength, flags etc. A good site to check out and one of the models for CC2 Al Kavadlo We're Working Out! . I believe he has been doing body-weight only work for the last 2 years.
                      Thanks for the shout out! I should clarify, however. I've been training bodyweight pretty much exclusively for the last few years, but I've been doing strength training for nearly 20 years. Pull-ups and push-ups have been part of my regimen since I was a kid. Results take time!
                      "In theory, theory and practice are the same. In practice, they couldn't be more different."

                      "You can have anything you want, but you can't have everything you want."

                      My blog: http://www.AlKavadlo.com

                      sigpic

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                      • #26
                        Unfortunately, slow and steady wins this race. I tried pushing through the progressions too fast and well, it didn't end so well. This time around I have been taking it primally slow and things are going a lot better!
                        Regards,
                        ~ Chris

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                        • #27
                          Originally posted by bluechip View Post
                          Unfortunately, slow and steady wins this race. I tried pushing through the progressions too fast and well, it didn't end so well. This time around I have been taking it primally slow and things are going a lot better!
                          I had the same problem. I tried to blast through the progressions last year and ended up so stuck that I couldn't get past my plateaus. I went back to the barbell ashamed and defeated. Now I'm back on and starting from the bottom (that's a different kind of frustration right there). Coach Wade is right when it comes to building training momentum. I've been on step 1 (I know, I started WAY at the bottom) for two weeks and just tested my pull-up max...and blew up my last PR by 5 reps, from 12 to 17. Stuff's no joke.
                          Josh Vernier, CPT

                          My Journal

                          Evolution Revolution Fitness

                          "The question isn't who is going to let me; it's who is going to stop me."

                          -Ayn Rand

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                          • #28
                            How excited am I to find this thread!

                            I started CC in March. I just met progression for squats, pushups and HLR to step 6. But I am stuck like a #@!er on pullups at stage 2. Part of this is from excess weight (last year, when I was 30 pounds thinner, I could do 20 standard pullups on a beam). But it is super-frustrating not to get past those blasted horizontal pulls. 3x30 is a bastard!

                            I agree with those who noted that it's about a long-term program, though. And Coach Wade is very specific about the fact that pullups take longer than other moves.

                            And my arms are silly pumped after those horizontal pulls - even if I can't get to 30 at belly-button level yet.

                            I think this program fits great with the whole Primal thing (or at least - it looks like it would). And it works very well with a sensible kettle bell program, too.

                            So I would echo those who say to take your time and move through the progressions. Even if you feel like you can breeze through, take at least a month on each. Like Coach says, "put strength in the bank"!

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                            • #29
                              I've just been reading the book and am now committing to a period away from bars and dumbbells. However, I realise it says to start with the very easiest exercises but pullups and pressups have been part of my training for a very long time and I'm loathe to go way back to the start. Surely if I can bang out 20 strict form pressups for 2 sets quite easily I'd be good to start there instead of going all the way down to wall pressups? Considering I can actually do the sets of uneven pressups I believe step 5 would be a fair enough position to launch from?

                              Same with the squats, though I do plan to go to stage 1 as my squat form has never been that great so see this as a perfect opportuniuty to nail the correct form.
                              Do what you love and do it often. If you don't like something, change it. if you don't like your job, quit. If you don't have enough time, stop watching tv. If you are looking for the love of your life, stop, they will be waiting for you when you start doing the things you love. Stop over analyzing, life is simple. When you eat, appreciate every last bite. Some opportunities only come once, seize them.

                              https://www.facebook.com/ForgedFromFat

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                              • #30
                                I just pulled the trigger on this book as well. 2 years of weights (Max OT then Starting Strength) has resulted in me going from the body of a ten-year-old boy to that of a twelve-year-old. I've accepted my scrawny lanky genetics and the fact that I'm not going to add any significant bulk without pounding back 5,000 calories a day. I'm just burnt-out and I've hit a wall...time to blow it all up and start a completely fresh routine. And hey, a one-armed handstand pushup would be a pretty neat party trick.

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