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  • figuring out you low heart rate- need help

    i would like to make sure i'm working at my 55-75% target heart zone

    I have a Polar F4 heart rate monitor and I did some spint work and figured my max heart rate at 182 but what is my low? my monitor asks for a high a low

    I did an internet search and didnt find anything

    anyone know?

    im female, 34 yo and 135 lbs if that matters

    thanks jaime

  • #2
    Low might mean your resting HR but I think the high and the low is for setting your target zone. If you go above or below it will beep at you. If you want to use 182 as your max then
    High will be .75*182=136.5
    Low will be .55*182=100
    Eating primal is not a diet, it is a way of life.
    PS
    Don't forget to play!

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    • #3
      oh i thought i put 182 as the high in the heart rate monitor and then work at 75%

      because when I workout it tells me my % heart rate so when you input the high low its your "goal" high low?

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      • #4
        Hmmm...

        I tried to look at the product info for an FT4 (there was no F4 listed, so I assumed a typo) and couldn't find enough to provide you any decent direction. There was a link to a PDF of the the instruction manual, but that link was broken.

        Were I doing the HRM route for trying to stay in the 55-75% zone, I'd probably not purchase one so complex. I'd just look for one that simply displayed your heart rate and then did the calculations by hand as described above and monitored as I worked out. But, that's just me...

        I'd try what the other poster suggested and put in the calculated 55% and 75% numbers work out to be for min and max and see if it works they way they describe it.

        OR try putting in your max (182) for the Max and 0 in for the min. Then if it displays percentages, using the range of 0(0%)-182(100%), as long as the percentage was between 55 and 75, you'd be in the correct training "zone".
        Last edited by tim_1522; 02-14-2012, 05:30 PM.
        Re-focusing on the Primal Lifestyle in 2012!

        Starting: 221.0lb, 29.5% BF (1/9/2012)
        Latest: 208.9, 26.1% BF (3/19/2012)

        http://www.marksdailyapple.com/forum/thread35679.html

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        • #5
          the monitor that I have is the F4, its 15 years old. pretty basic

          you put your weight, height, birthday,sex in and it gives you your heart rate, calories burned and % hr

          i just wanted to have the % correct.

          maybe i'll send Polar an email tomorrow and ask them

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          • #6
            Your minimum heart rate is zero. We all hit it at some point.
            The 55-75% is a percentage of the maximum; the minimum or resting is irrelevant.
            55% of 182 = 100 bpm
            75% of 182 = 137 bpm

            If the monitor wants a low for some other calculation I assume that'd be your resting.
            Measure your HR when you wake up in the morning, while still lying in bed.

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            • #7
              Jaime - You need to measure your resting heart rate to figure this out. Then subtract resting HR from max HR to get your heart rate reserve.

              If your resting heart rate turns out to be 60 bpm, then your heart rate reserve is 182 - 60 = 122 bpm.

              55% of 122 = 67
              75% of 122 = 92

              Now add your resting heart rate to get the lower and upper limit of the zone. In this example it would be 127 - 152 bpm.

              If you just used the simple method to calculate heart rate, and exercise at 100 - 137 bpm, you would only be at 33% - 63%.

              It's easiest to just use an online calculator for this. I like this one:
              Target Heart Rate Range

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              • #8
                The online calculator gives me 55% = 129.5 and 75% = 151.5. (Age = 41, resting heart rate = 69)

                During interval training, when I occasionally go flat out for a minute on an exercise bike my heart rate gets up to about 145 (calorie output ~ 1000/hr). On a cross trainer, it gets up to about 155 (calorie output ~1400/hr). I have been regarding these high intensity intervals as sprinting. During most of my workout my heart rate is between 115 and 135.

                I am very fit with a very good VO2 max. Would this make my maximum heart rate lower than average?

                Is it worth measuring one's maximum heart rate? I presume maximum would only be reached once glycogen stores are depleted and under other adverse circumstances such as high altitude.
                F 5 ft 3. HW: 196 lbs. Primal SW (May 2011): 182 lbs (42% BF)... W June '12: 160 lbs (29% BF) (UK size 12, US size 8). GW: ~24% BF - have ditched the scales til I fit into a pair of UK size 10 bootcut jeans. Currently aligning towards 'The Perfect Health Diet' having swapped some fat for potatoes.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by primal-dan View Post
                  Jaime - You need to measure your resting heart rate to figure this out. Then subtract resting HR from max HR to get your heart rate reserve.

                  If your resting heart rate turns out to be 60 bpm, then your heart rate reserve is 182 - 60 = 122 bpm.

                  55% of 122 = 67
                  75% of 122 = 92

                  Now add your resting heart rate to get the lower and upper limit of the zone. In this example it would be 127 - 152 bpm.

                  If you just used the simple method to calculate heart rate, and exercise at 100 - 137 bpm, you would only be at 33% - 63%.

                  It's easiest to just use an online calculator for this. I like this one:
                  Target Heart Rate Range
                  Ah, but those are two different things, no?

                  %-age of maximum heart rate vs. %-age of heart rate reserve

                  I think that every piece of literature regarding PBF and "Moving slowly..." specifies 55-75% of maximum heart rate (MHR in things like the PBF e-Book), and NOT heart rate reserve.

                  So, for the OP using the measured 182 for MHR, that would be 100-137 bpm. Perhaps it's worth it to the OP fo shoot an email to Mark for clarification...
                  Re-focusing on the Primal Lifestyle in 2012!

                  Starting: 221.0lb, 29.5% BF (1/9/2012)
                  Latest: 208.9, 26.1% BF (3/19/2012)

                  http://www.marksdailyapple.com/forum/thread35679.html

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by paleo-bunny View Post
                    I am very fit with a very good VO2 max. Would this make my maximum heart rate lower than average?
                    On the contrary, I would think that a very fit, very aerobically inclined individual would have a higher measured MHR
                    Is it worth measuring one's maximum heart rate? I presume maximum would only be reached once glycogen stores are depleted and under other adverse circumstances such as high altitude.
                    There's a lot of different mentality on how to arrive at an MHR number. Here's one article: How to Accurately Determine Your Maximum Heart Rate & Have An Out of Body Experience At the Same Time | Complete Running Network

                    For individuals, you are The thing is for "world class" athletes, accurately it might be critical to precisely determine MHR based...since all of your other training targets are based on this. As the link above points out: "your training program will be flawed, and your odds of under- or over-training are that much greater."

                    For most people following PBF, I don't think we are world class athletes, so I don't think it's that critical. Using 220-age for the purpose of hitting the 55-75% zone is probably good enough. Alternately, if you have a monitor and you have measured a different value on YOU, that's probably preferable. With said monitor, you can follow one of the many "at home" procedures for measuring MHR. Or you can do a sprint session and note the highest value you see on the monitor. Or you can do a Cardiac Stress Test as mentioned in the article under a doctor's supervision.

                    Know that whatever you measure as your MHR, it's going to change over time.
                    Re-focusing on the Primal Lifestyle in 2012!

                    Starting: 221.0lb, 29.5% BF (1/9/2012)
                    Latest: 208.9, 26.1% BF (3/19/2012)

                    http://www.marksdailyapple.com/forum/thread35679.html

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      paleo-bunny - if you are very fit then short sprints aren't going to get you anywhere near your MHR. Doing a few quick searches for "max heart rate test" shows you need about 10 minutes, with half that time used to warm up. I'd just use 220 - age unless you regularly wear an HRM and have a compelling reason to think it's something else.
                      Last edited by primal-dan; 02-15-2012, 02:33 PM.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by tim_1522 View Post
                        Ah, but those are two different things, no?

                        %-age of maximum heart rate vs. %-age of heart rate reserve

                        I think that every piece of literature regarding PBF and "Moving slowly..." specifies 55-75% of maximum heart rate (MHR in things like the PBF e-Book), and NOT heart rate reserve.

                        So, for the OP using the measured 182 for MHR, that would be 100-137 bpm. Perhaps it's worth it to the OP fo shoot an email to Mark for clarification...
                        Using the simple calculation works OK the younger and fitter you are. The older and less fit the more error there is.

                        To put it another way, using your simple calculation an unfit person could reach 50% of their max heart rate just by sitting on the couch.
                        Last edited by primal-dan; 02-15-2012, 02:35 PM.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by tim_1522 View Post
                          On the contrary, I would think that a very fit, very aerobically inclined individual would have a higher measured MHRThere's a lot of different mentality on how to arrive at an MHR number. Here's one article: How to Accurately Determine Your Maximum Heart Rate & Have An Out of Body Experience At the Same Time | Complete Running Network

                          For individuals, you are The thing is for "world class" athletes, accurately it might be critical to precisely determine MHR based...since all of your other training targets are based on this. As the link above points out: "your training program will be flawed, and your odds of under- or over-training are that much greater."

                          For most people following PBF, I don't think we are world class athletes, so I don't think it's that critical. Using 220-age for the purpose of hitting the 55-75% zone is probably good enough. Alternately, if you have a monitor and you have measured a different value on YOU, that's probably preferable. With said monitor, you can follow one of the many "at home" procedures for measuring MHR. Or you can do a sprint session and note the highest value you see on the monitor. Or you can do a Cardiac Stress Test as mentioned in the article under a doctor's supervision.

                          Know that whatever you measure as your MHR, it's going to change over time.
                          Nice article.

                          I can't remember where I read it but I believe regular exercise will keep your MHR from falling over time. The 220-age formula works for people who are sedentary or young. It's pretty close for me. I track all my runs with a Garmin and the highest I've gotten my HR is 185 bpm, by sprinting at the end of a 5 mile run. I'm 33 so the formula estimates 187 as my max.
                          Last edited by primal-dan; 02-15-2012, 02:54 PM.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Thanks for your comments tim_1522 and primal-dan. Much appreciated. I conclude that I'm doing the low-level cardio right but that I need to push myself harder for sprints. I've never seen my heart rate go above about 160 even when going flat out. I am apparently at risk of having weak heart valves as I have hypermobile joints. That might be an unidentified issue, so I should really get an exercise test ECG done.
                            F 5 ft 3. HW: 196 lbs. Primal SW (May 2011): 182 lbs (42% BF)... W June '12: 160 lbs (29% BF) (UK size 12, US size 8). GW: ~24% BF - have ditched the scales til I fit into a pair of UK size 10 bootcut jeans. Currently aligning towards 'The Perfect Health Diet' having swapped some fat for potatoes.

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