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Primal fitness theory versus 12 Weeks to BUD/S

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  • Primal fitness theory versus 12 Weeks to BUD/S

    Before I get to my question / problem; I would like to provide some background information first. I am a Air Force pilot. Through my numerous deployments and the unique physiological demands, I am now "blessed" with a couple of herniated discs. I am also a fitness nut. I have been through Pavel Tsatlouine's (spelling?) various kettlebell programs, one run so far through P90X, and I have completed Stew Smith's 12 Weeks to BUD/S once so far. I have never dieted, never cared or thought about what I eat. Then came marriage and two kids. From Thanksgiving to New Years of this year, I did nott workout and I ate to my heart's content. The last three years I have been plagued with health issues and the last two months have seen a spike in health concerns. So my wife and I did some research and we decided together that we are going to change our way of living and follow the Primal Blueprint. We have been doing it for about a week now and the lack of carbs is killing me (but I have been a good boy). I am still reading through the books that we bought, but it appears that the "fitness" regime discussed in the books is very benign compared to what I am doing. I am in the middle of week three of the "beginners" portion of 12 Weeks to BUD/s. It is my intent to complete the whole program and I do LOVE it.

    All that being said, here are my questions:
    1.) I seem to be in a perpetual state of hunger of various degrees depending on whenever I ate last. Is that normal? Should I be consuming more food?
    2.) I am not going to be able to follow the Primal Blueprint fitness concept. I a going to stay with 12 Weeks to BUD/S and I am curious how I should alter my diet (if I shoould at all)?

  • #2
    I have Stew Smith's books and I've completed the 12 weeks to BUDS and I will say that the calorie expenditure is off the charts. You will probably have to eat more carbohydrates while on this program.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by LonghornGrif View Post
      All that being said, here are my questions:
      1.) I seem to be in a perpetual state of hunger of various degrees depending on whenever I ate last. Is that normal? Should I be consuming more food?
      2.) I am not going to be able to follow the Primal Blueprint fitness concept. I a going to stay with 12 Weeks to BUD/S and I am curious how I should alter my diet (if I shoould at all)?
      1. Eat more. Not more often, just more. Full meals, 1-3 times per day. That's all.
      2. Why can't you do PBF? (Long sarcastic paragraph deleted here.) Read up on recovery time, and how it benefits you. Body by Science has a pretty good explanation of it. Even the PBF e-book explains what overtraining will do to you.

      Finally, add more carbs, if that is what your body needs.

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      • #4
        i can't do this anymore.

        if you can't tell me problem, ask me question, in 25 words or less, i can't help you son.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by dado View Post
          i can't do this anymore.

          if you can't tell me problem, ask me question, in 25 words or less, i can't help you son.
          Aren't you just gonna say "go squat" anyway?
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          • #6
            Originally posted by Coach Palfrey View Post
            Aren't you just gonna say "go squat" anyway?
            hahahaha, this is true, coach!

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Nash View Post
              I have Stew Smith's books and I've completed the 12 weeks to BUDS and I will say that the calorie expenditure is off the charts. You will probably have to eat more carbohydrates while on this program.
              That has been my experience so far though I have been able to successfully stay away from carbs and stuff myself from the "approved" list of items on the Primal Blueprint. Good to seee that someone else has experienced this and I appreciate the response.

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              • #8
                Wow, great insight. That was extremely helpful. I am so glad you took the time to answer....wait...

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by jfreaksho View Post
                  1. Eat more. Not more often, just more. Full meals, 1-3 times per day. That's all.
                  2. Why can't you do PBF? (Long sarcastic paragraph deleted here.) Read up on recovery time, and how it benefits you. Body by Science has a pretty good explanation of it. Even the PBF e-book explains what overtraining will do to you.

                  Finally, add more carbs, if that is what your body needs.
                  Thanks for the response. I will take a look at the book you recommended. I cannot do the PBF because it will not prepare me physically for the PT tests I am currently required to do with the military nor prepare my body for the extra PT requirements that will be required of me when I apply for a position in AFSOC.

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                  • #10
                    I am going to give some unsolicited advice. I was a 300 PFT scorer consistantly in the Marine Corps. (That means I ran 3 miles under 18 minutes, performed 20 pullups, and 80 sit ups in under 2 minutes. ) I was able to due this by hitting the pullup bar and the weight room consistantly ontop of the daily pt(we would run 3-10 miles a day, calisthenics or hump for 10-30 miles most fridays. Ontop of that I spent a couple of weeks a month in the field Combat patroling and living out in the weather.
                    As PFT time approached I simply added a timed 3 mile run to my weekly reutine to benchmark where I was and let my weight come down to 172(normally I was 176-182 in my early 20's).
                    The best preparation is to develop a sense of humor and patience. Don't get hurt, never let anyone see you slacking(physical exeptionalism just drives up expectations. Remember a weak applicant who puts out has a better shot than a strong one who breezes through. It's more about displaying persaverance unders stress and pain than it is about being the best athlete.


                    Military PT is more about mental toughness than physical excptionalism. Being able to tolerate long hours of marches , pack runs , hours in a pool to gain water qualifications etc. It's all about being able to tolerate exhaustion and respond when asked for more. It requires you to be confident that you can indeed do it.
                    There were few things you can do to prepare for these exertions. You need to be well rested when the demand begins and get rest as soon as possible when it is over because you never know when more is going to be demanded of you.

                    Best of luck in your pursuits.
                    Integrity is what we do when nobody's watching.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by LonghornGrif View Post
                      Thanks for the response. I will take a look at the book you recommended. I cannot do the PBF because it will not prepare me physically for the PT tests I am currently required to do with the military nor prepare my body for the extra PT requirements that will be required of me when I apply for a position in AFSOC.
                      I understand where you are coming from, as I would have had that opinion not too long ago as well. It seems too easy, but it does work. I'm scoring over 90 points in both my pushup and situp events, and my run time is over 80 points, and I haven't done anything but PBF for the past 6 months to a year (using Convict Conditioning as my Lifting of Heavy Things). My run time dropped almost 2 minutes for two miles, pushups increased from about 55 in two minutes to over 70, with a similar increase for situps. In addition, my back problems have gone away. My knee problems are almost gone (one kneecap was reconstructed after I woke up under my motorcycle some years back). I feel healthier and am objectively more fit than I have been since I was 20 years old, a little over 11 years ago.

                      It's not that you have to follow it to the letter, but the principles are valid: Walk a lot (with a ruck, if you want). Lift a couple of times a week (more often, and your body won't be able to recover). Sprint once or twice a week (again, if your intensity is up there, you need the recovery time). Above all, recover properly, so you can be stronger the next time. Recovery time is at least as important as the workout you do. You just don't put forth any mental effort into it, so it seems like a waste of time. Recovery time is where the magic really happens.

                      I don't know about the AF, but the Army knows very little about physical recovery time- it's always about doing more, and training to failure every day. Do some research on it. I might give myself more recovery time than I really need, but I'm not training for Selection. There's no reason to punish your body or beat yourself down to become stronger and faster. The military will do that for you.

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