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  • info on Convict conditioning

    Can anybody give me some feed back on the book Convict conditioning... I am thinking of buying it I have not access to a gym and i have been doing a lot of body weight workouts....

    Thanks..

  • #2
    After years of barbell lifting, kettlebells etc I have started body-weight training. I started because some barbell moves like the bench press agrivated my shoulder so I substituted pushups and dips instead. I was already doing pullups so giving Convict Conditioning a go seemed like a good thing. So far I am loving it. The big 6 moves are broken down into 10 manageable (over time) steps. I would say get yourself a pull-up bar and the book and enjoy.

    PS
    I still do kettlebells, sandbag training and Deadlifts along with the moving slow and sprints. It just means my workouts are spread out over more than a week.
    Eating primal is not a diet, it is a way of life.
    PS
    Don't forget to play!

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    • #3
      Buy it, its great. It builds loads of strength, easy to do, well set out. Also download the primal blueprint for fitness and mix it up between the two.
      www.back-to-primal.blogspot.com or on Facebook here

      My training journal if anyone is interested

      Be strong to be useful

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      • #4
        I've been doing Convict Conditioning for about eight months and I love it. I've been in the military for 12 years, and by using CC combined with PBF, I'm stronger and faster than I've been since I was 21 or 22. Totally worth it.

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        • #5
          I'd say it is pretty good, you could give the program to an out of shape 70 year old or a fit 25 year old and each could get something out of it. I find that it works for my busy life and I'll usually do one of the big 6 moves once a week, one at a time, say before going to work or in between doing chores on the weekend. Some periods when I am busy, I just focus on maintaing. Other times I really focus on doing more reps and progressing, just kind of depends what else I am doing at the time. I've noticed that exercises not only get easier when you get stronger but also when you lose some fat.

          Check out these videos, they do quick demos of the various 10 steps in each of the 6 exercises and show the proper cadence. This is Step 1, you can find the other ones easily.

          Convict Conditioning - Step 1 [No Audio] - YouTube

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          • #6
            I just bought this book and started the program last week as a continuation of the efitness book on this site. It's really good - very incremental breakdown of the work which is good for a beginner to bodyweight stuff like me. It also ties nicely into yoga with the headstands/backbends that I could never really master in yoga class...hoping for that to change once I begin moving up in strength.

            I brought it to work and while the title makes my coworkers laugh - they all picked it up, looked at it and really liked what they saw.... talked about getting a copy etc.
            We are all in the gutter, but some of us are looking at the stars. - Oscar Wilde

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            • #7
              I have and like the book.

              The only real criticism I've heard is that several people say Step 10 of the One-handed pushup is impossible as described. Even the guy who's posing for the photo says he can't do it. The author still claims it's actually possible and he did it.

              I also heard one of the exercises might place undue stress on your body/spine/somewhere, but don't remember exactly what.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by jfreaksho View Post
                I've been doing Convict Conditioning for about eight months and I love it. I've been in the military for 12 years, and by using CC combined with PBF, I'm stronger and faster than I've been since I was 21 or 22. Totally worth it.
                jf, how did you start out? How long were you on the first progressions? I'm about to start this with my wife and will probably go at her pace but want to hear how you progressed. By the way I also have 12 years in the military.

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                • #9
                  It's a great book for progressive calisthenics.There are 6 exercises outlined in the book,the author calls them the "big 6".

                  Push ups
                  Pull ups
                  Squats
                  Leg raises
                  Bridges
                  Handstand Push ups

                  Each exercise has ten steps,which are variations that either make the exercise harder or easier.For example,while the standard push up is number 5 in the ten steps of the push up series,the first is wall push ups,which anyone can do if they aren't disabled in some way.Now,on the other end of the spectrum,the 10th step or "master step" is the one armed push up.Basically there's a progressive routine that builds up gradually from easy exercises to the gold standards of calisthenics.All the exercises have detailed photos and explanations,and there's a fairly large amount of info on why calisthenics were the exercise of choice up until things like machines came into popularity.I think it's well worth the money,and if you follow the instructions properly you'll definitely get stronger and gain a lot of flexibility and increase your overall fitness.On another note,I just ordered convict conditioning 2,since I liked the first so much.
                  Believe nothing, no matter where you read it, or who has said it, no matter if I have said it, unless it agrees with your own reason and your own experience.

                  In the mind of the beginner, there are many possibilities; in the mind of the expert, there are few.


                  I've shaken hands with a raccoon and lived to tell the tale

                  SW: 220- 225 pounds at the beginning of January
                  CW: 180 pounds

                  Goals for 2012: Lose a bit more fat and start a serious muscle and strength routine

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Busphan View Post
                    jf, how did you start out? How long were you on the first progressions? I'm about to start this with my wife and will probably go at her pace but want to hear how you progressed. By the way I also have 12 years in the military.
                    I started out in March or April of 2011, from the beginning, though I didn't stay there long. I moved through pushups quickly, as I've been doing them for so long. I've seen the most improvement in squats- my thighs are bigger and firmer and stronger (even my wife says so). I think that I saw the improvement there most because I lost so much muscle when I busted up my knee six years ago, and I never built it back up.

                    My pull-up progression has been maybe the worst, but I think that sometimes I'm too impatient and skip ahead too soon. Also, my grip strength is holding me back on the hanging leg raises and pullups.

                    I could probably stand to drop back down a level or two on back bridges, and pullups, and I definitely need to do more handstands and less working on the handstand pushups.

                    Short answer: If you were a Marine, you'll probably have better back strength and grip strength than I do. Any of the other services, I would bet that your 12 years of military fitness training left your back under-developed, unless you worked it on your own.

                    And I'd say that you shouldn't go at your wife's pace, as it will take her far longer to progress on the upper-body stuff. Work out together, but you don't have to do the exact same exercises for each workout. There's a reason the military standards for women are different.

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                    • #11
                      I'm Air Force, and would have to agree with you that my back needs work. I also thought the same thing about workout with her, but doing it at our own pace. Another thing, how hard is it to start with the early progressions? Did you only do cc or did combine it with another workout?

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                      • #12
                        He Coach Wade recommends only doing it and it should be enough...there are some big moves when you move up in the series - you will know you have worked out.
                        Eating primal is not a diet, it is a way of life.
                        PS
                        Don't forget to play!

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Dirlot View Post
                          He Coach Wade recommends only doing it and it should be enough...there are some big moves when you move up in the series - you will know you have worked out.
                          I was just wondering about combining it with something else in the lower progressions. I guess I will just go with it, I don't have to do another PT test until October. Thanks for all the advise, and sorry for the thread jacking.

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Busphan View Post
                            I was just wondering about combining it with something else in the lower progressions. I guess I will just go with it, I don't have to do another PT test until October. Thanks for all the advise, and sorry for the thread jacking.
                            I've done a lot of pushups over the years, and I definitely found benefits to starting at the beginning, even with pushups. The slow pace and the strict form that Wade insists upon was not what I was accustomed to- the Army lets you put your hands wherever you want, and CC tells you to keep your elbows tucked against your body. It was way more tricep and far less chest than I was used to, but I've moved past that now.

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by jfreaksho View Post
                              I've done a lot of pushups over the years, and I definitely found benefits to starting at the beginning, even with pushups. The slow pace and the strict form that Wade insists upon was not what I was accustomed to- the Army lets you put your hands wherever you want, and CC tells you to keep your elbows tucked against your body. It was way more tricep and far less chest than I was used to, but I've moved past that now.
                              Thanks for the reply, I just finished my first workout. I'm using the good behavior workout and I see what you guys mean. I can see how the cadence will get tough as you move through the progressions. I can do pushups but do need to work on them and this is exactly what I need.

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