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Squats and those Hip Flexors

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  • Squats and those Hip Flexors

    Seems like my hip flexors are getting awful tight and it's making these squats more difficult. I feel like it's holding me back on progressing with weight on the back squats. I'm stretching in between sets and stretching at the end of workout. They aren't sore and don't feel injured, but when I load up weight and go to squat, these hip flexors are holding me back from getting nice form and adding weight.

    Any tips/tricks?

  • #2
    MobilityWOD

    Best place there is.
    www.back-to-primal.blogspot.com or on Facebook here

    My training journal if anyone is interested

    Be strong to be useful

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    • #3
      Cool link. I think I have some tightness in my glutes/adductors. My low back is rounding a bit when I get low. I used a softball on my glutes earlier, and it sure as hell hurt, so hopefully that will help some.
      KFCialis - It may be boneless...but you won't be! - Stephen Colbert

      My Powerlifting journal in preparation for my first meet - http://www.marksdailyapple.com/forum/thread54184.html

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      • #4
        Simple solution...Stop back squatting. Switch to front squats or single leg squats. Your hip flexors aren't really active in the squat anyway except as stabilizers at the bottom, and that's probably only the rectus femoris which crosses the knee and hip. Are you rounding your back only at the bottom? If that's the case you need to stretch your psoas, if that's not the case your issue is something else entirely. Tell me specifics and I can probably help you out.
        Last edited by Dave Mayo; 01-18-2012, 04:50 AM.

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        • #5
          don't stop back squatting. work on your hip flexor mobility. the Mobility WOD is the place to be.

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          • #6
            i have problems squatting as well. i switched to doing deadlifts
            Primal Chaos
            37yo 6'5"
            6-19-2011 393lbs 60" waist
            current 338lbs 49" waist
            goal 240lbs 35" waist

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            • #7
              T NATION | Third-World Squat

              Try sitting in this position every day for as long as you can. It has helped me hip flexors tremendously. I agree, don't stop back squatting, work on mobility.

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              • #8
                from what i understand, sitting is one thing that makes hip flexors tighten up. if you are doing the third world squat wouldnt that also shorten/tighten the flexors? at work i lowered my chair as far as it will go which puts me in a position similar to a squat when sitting. it doesnt seem to really do much for me at all. everything ive seen about hip flexors says you want to lengthen them by stretching them, you do that by standing or a lunge type stretch not sitting/squating

                besides people with tight hip flexors may not actually be able to do a proper third world squat
                Primal Chaos
                37yo 6'5"
                6-19-2011 393lbs 60" waist
                current 338lbs 49" waist
                goal 240lbs 35" waist

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                • #9
                  Blah - thanks for the link. That was recommended on my other squats post, so I must delve more into that mobility site.

                  I am not rounding my back. I'm watching myself carefully, because I noticed I was doing this twist/shift thing when I stand back up out of the squat. I dropped to lower weights and began to focus on standing straight up from both hips. Definitely not rounding my back out.
                  I think this hip flexor tightness is why I was doing that twist/shift when I come back up from the squat.

                  Third World Squat - not a problem from me. Three pregnancies, natural childbirth, and now homeschooling sahm who is regularly down on the floor playing with the kids. I don't like to sit in the grass, so I'll squat instead. I've had lots of practice sitting in that squat.

                  Deadlifts - love these. Just got my form on these down pat and my hip flexors don't bother me when I do deadlifts. Just coming up from the squat. When I have an extra day of rest between workouts, they don't bother me as much. But if I go every other day, it feels very limiting... Which is maybe the answer.

                  Thanks for all the ideas.

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                  • #10
                    I have very tight hip flexors and this has helped a lot. Also, foam rolling the area or with a lacrosse ball.

                    But nope, you sit with your elbows forcing your knees out, keeping them mobile.

                    When you sit in a chair, your hips are immobilized. Try it before putting it down.

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                    • #11
                      like i said some people, including me, can not get into the third world squat position. how can i try it if i cant do it?
                      Primal Chaos
                      37yo 6'5"
                      6-19-2011 393lbs 60" waist
                      current 338lbs 49" waist
                      goal 240lbs 35" waist

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        I use the Rumble Roller; it's a foam roller that I use for my whole body; it REALLY works! Comes with P90X2, but you can just buy them, too. I can't recommend it enough.

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by HeyChelle View Post
                          Blah - thanks for the link. That was recommended on my other squats post, so I must delve more into that mobility site.

                          I am not rounding my back. I'm watching myself carefully, because I noticed I was doing this twist/shift thing when I stand back up out of the squat. I dropped to lower weights and began to focus on standing straight up from both hips. Definitely not rounding my back out.
                          I think this hip flexor tightness is why I was doing that twist/shift when I come back up from the squat.

                          Third World Squat - not a problem from me. Three pregnancies, natural childbirth, and now homeschooling sahm who is regularly down on the floor playing with the kids. I don't like to sit in the grass, so I'll squat instead. I've had lots of practice sitting in that squat.

                          Deadlifts - love these. Just got my form on these down pat and my hip flexors don't bother me when I do deadlifts. Just coming up from the squat. When I have an extra day of rest between workouts, they don't bother me as much. But if I go every other day, it feels very limiting... Which is maybe the answer.

                          Thanks for all the ideas.
                          Twisting/shifting is a symmetry issue, but it sounds like you are overdoing it which is bringing out a compensation from either an old injury or just some repetitive posture you normally hold. Personally I think back squats are a complete waste of time and more likely to cause an injury due to shear stress on the lumbar spine. I have my clients do either front squats or single leg squats instead, single leg squats are my preference because you eliminate the bilateral deficit (You can single leg squat more combined on both legs than a back squat because the lumbar spine is the weak link, not your legs).

                          As for the question on sitting tightening hip flexors, that's only true if you are completely unloaded (I.e., sitting in a chair). The lack of tension in the agonist and antagonist muscle groups sends an injury signal so your fascia starts laying down scar tissue. This is why if you sit for prolonged periods your feel tension in your hip flexors. Provided you don't sit for hours at a time you will just break down that scar tissue when you move, foam rolling also does a good job of doing it. The longer this scar tissue goes without being broken down the tougher it is t break it down. Sitting in the bottom of a squat won't lead to the same issue, lowering your chair to put yourself in to this position will.

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