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Gaining muscle without squats and deadlifts

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  • Gaining muscle without squats and deadlifts



    I followed the PB diet for 2 years whilst continuing with a typical endurance training program for road cycling. My cycling improved significantly mainly as a result of additional weight loss.


    I never suffered any injuries previously as a cyclist, however, since excising in a PB way I have suffered 2 injuries. The problem is the heavy lifting parts. I have a permanent sore back from and dead lifting and my shoulder hurts most of the time.


    I am 43 years old, 5ft 10" and 144 lbs. I have managed to gain some muscle following the strong lifts program but I feel the risk of injury is too high and I do not feel good with all these aches and pains.


    Once my injuries are improved, is there any way I can gain muscle without squatting and dead lifting.


    In the meantime, I am stopping lifting and returning to my chronic _ cardio training until my injuries have healed.


  • #2
    1



    Sounds like you need to work on your form.


    If you get injured you need to let it recover. "a permanent sore back from and dead lifting and my shoulder hurts most of the time" is not good practice.


    The risk of injury while on PB is no different to the risk of injury on any other diet. You need to know what you are doing and do it properly.


    Lifting a significant amount of weight with bad form is a guaranteed way of injuring yourself.

    The "Seven Deadly Sins"

    • Grains (wheat/rice/oats etc) . . . . . • Dairy (milk/yogurt/butter/cheese etc) . . . . .• Nightshades (peppers/tomato/eggplant etc)
    • Tubers (potato/arrowroot etc) . . . • Modernly palatable (cashews/olives etc) . . . • Refined foods (salt/sugars etc )
    • Legumes (soy/beans/peas etc)

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    • #3
      1



      Agree with Tarlach.


      Sounds like you need to work on your form, probably with lighter weight, until you get it down pat...AFTER your injuries heal.


      Maybe try bodyweight work to get some baseline strength before moving into lifting iron. Form is important with b/w, too.

      Nightlife ~ Chronicles of Less Urban Living, Fresh from In the Night Farm ~ Idaho's Primal Farm! http://inthenightlife.wordpress.com/

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      • #4
        1



        Why the hell you would need squats?

        There are also replacements for deadlifts

        I will be normal. I will be NORMAL again
        Yeah!

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        • #5
          1



          It sounds to me like a combination of bad form and overtraining.


          Squats place a TREMENDOUS strain on your body, which is why they lead to increased test/HGH production. If done correctly, they should definitely be enough of a workout by themselves, with no need for the bike/cardio.


          Rest up, and either up your calories to give your body plenty for recovery or drop the bike.

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          • #6
            1



            My squats are done in a power cage with the support bar set near an upright position. It allows for a 1 inch range static hold for 1 -5 seconds.


            I actually do 2 reps, with no plates on the bar, 2 with half weight to make sure I'm comfortable with my form. Then I do my one lift.


            If you are still nervous about squats, then try the big 5

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            • #7
              1



              It's your form. I had the same problem - my lower back was killing me, until I got the form right. Post a video of yourself at the SL forum and we'll help you.


              For now, take a break from squatting/deadlifting and stretch a lot and do hip mobility exercises. Those really helped me. Don't give up.

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              • #8
                1



                @ Raphael

                What is the SL forum?


                @Vick

                I don&#39;t understand how supprt bar can be near upright position. Is that the bar that is suppose to catch barbell if something goes wrong?

                “It is a truism that almost any sect, cult, or religion will legislate its creeds into law if it acquires the political power to do so, and will follow it by suppressing opposition, subverting all education to seize early the minds of the young, and by killing, locking up, or driving underground all heretics.”
                —Robert A. Heinlein

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                • #9
                  1



                  @Asturian This link shows exacting how I do my dead lift.


                  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QZpzW_TTqb8&feature=related


                  With the squat the barbell is a couple inches below shoulder height. That way the range of motion is limited to the maximum contraction and strength range of the muscles.


                  The cage protects me from a lifting error.

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                  • #10
                    1



                    Thanks. I understand now.


                    One more question though.


                    Is the purpose of isometric exercises to grow muscle size or just strength?

                    “It is a truism that almost any sect, cult, or religion will legislate its creeds into law if it acquires the political power to do so, and will follow it by suppressing opposition, subverting all education to seize early the minds of the young, and by killing, locking up, or driving underground all heretics.”
                    —Robert A. Heinlein

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                    • #11
                      1



                      Both. However you still need to train the muscle. So if you want to be a stronger tennis player for example you do these once a week, and spend the rest of your time training for the skill.


                      I did these from August through to the end of October. Now I do the big 5 but I like to do a static hold every 6 weeks or so. I mentioined on another post my bench press has gone from 185 to 405.


                      Squat from 205 to 565 and the dead lift from 295 to 545. My next test will around the first of feb. That will be 180 days since starting my fitness progam.

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                      • #12
                        1



                        So then isometrics is just part of the mixing things up approach and full-motion or traditional exercises (like squat and dead) are part of the program too?


                        I would guess to maximize potential for working out all muscle fiber types?

                        “It is a truism that almost any sect, cult, or religion will legislate its creeds into law if it acquires the political power to do so, and will follow it by suppressing opposition, subverting all education to seize early the minds of the young, and by killing, locking up, or driving underground all heretics.”
                        —Robert A. Heinlein

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                        • #13
                          1



                          Squats and deadlifts are amazing exercises. The back and leg muscles are some of the biggest, and include many muscles. That&#39;s why those exercises are so good. If you&#39;re hurting yourself it&#39;s because you&#39;re weak in those areas and using poor form. Start with lighter weight until you gain strength and stability. You have to make sure your entire body is properly balanced, you can&#39;t expect to lift heavy weight if you have a weak core.

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                          • #14
                            1



                            There is one problem with doing static holds. You soon run out of plates for some of the exercises. For muscle growth it is all you need.


                            What the static hold is best at is time efficient muscle growth and weight loss. I was doing about 10 static holds a week. It took about forty minutes to reset for the different lifts, but each lift was about 1-5 seconds... under a minute a week of true stress under load.


                            These two links are a 2 part inerview of Tony Robbins interviewing Pete Sisco and John Little. They sum it up quite nicely. About 10 minutes each.


                            An important part of the program allowing the muscles to grow. That is why most only work out once a week.


                            http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4_OJdeWacFo


                            http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=T-6T_...eature=related

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                            • #15
                              1



                              That video was terrible. Are we supposed to be convinced by the fat guy, or the scrawny one?


                              All of the information I have read about static contractions, is that they do not add to functional strength. Most seasoned lifters actually lose full range strength doing this (even though they can static hold massive amounts.

                              * if you have never trained much, any strength training will help build muscle so it may work for a while.


                              Sounds like a complete waste of time and effort and completely unfeasible for home.

                              The "Seven Deadly Sins"

                              • Grains (wheat/rice/oats etc) . . . . . • Dairy (milk/yogurt/butter/cheese etc) . . . . .• Nightshades (peppers/tomato/eggplant etc)
                              • Tubers (potato/arrowroot etc) . . . • Modernly palatable (cashews/olives etc) . . . • Refined foods (salt/sugars etc )
                              • Legumes (soy/beans/peas etc)

                              Comment

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