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  • SuperSlow training quesiton

    Anyone here do SuperSlow weight training (Power of 10, etc.)? My question is, I don't really like using machines. Can you do these types of exercises with squat racks and free weights? Can you do a slow cadence deadlift? I've learned to associate machines with wimpy but maybe I need to readjust?
    Female
    31 yrs old
    5' 1"
    started: 113.5
    current: 109.7
    goal: my only goal right now is to get pregnant... 14 cycles and counting.
    exercise: Body by Science - loving it.

  • #2
    doing super slow reps sounds relatively safer with machines. Why not just stick to free weights if you don't like machines?
    Currently dabbling in: IF, leangains, Starting Strength, 5/3/1

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    • #3
      Originally posted by mcsnick View Post
      Anyone here do SuperSlow weight training (Power of 10, etc.)? My question is, I don't really like using machines. Can you do these types of exercises with squat racks and free weights? Can you do a slow cadence deadlift? I've learned to associate machines with wimpy but maybe I need to readjust?
      Yes, slow rep training can be used with free weights and even bodyweight. Machines were the basis of slow rep training because it started with Nautilus machines and research into women with osteoporosis but doesn't have to rely on machines and I wouldn't recommend that option unless you were coming back from injury, surgery, etc. There are many books out there emphasizing slow rep training with various tools but probably the best is the one you mentioned- "Power of 10" by Adam Zickerman. It includes routines with machines, free weights, and bodyweight.

      Keep in mind that you will need to adjust your rep range to suit the recommend TUT (time under tension). Recommended upper body TUT for strength/size is between 40-70 seconds, no more than 90 seconds. So, if using a 10/5 tempo you would stay in the 3-5 rep range and no more than 6 reps. Some trainers have found that there isn't much more benefit to doing a 10/5 rep speed as opposed to a 5/5 rep speed so they opt for the 5/5. In that case you would stay around the 5-7 rep range. Just some things to keep in mind.


      Steve

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      • #4
        I do super slow weight training, and I use a combination of free weights and body weight exercises. I'm doing a 10/10 rep speed, and the results have been fantastic. So yeah, it absolutely can and should be done.

        Also, I wouldn't worry about injury. I mean, sure we are going longer, but the weights we are lifting are lighter because of it. I feel like my body maxes itself with lifting, but I don't feel like it needs to recover the way it did with more traditional approaches to lifting.

        btw, slow deadlifts and squats work great. Just remember, when you first start, go with weights which are too light, and slowly figure out what your best max is.

        Last note. If you want super slow to work, be ready for pain. If you don't force your body to muscle failure for each and every exercise, if you aren't giving it your all, you will not make progress. I do 30 minutes of agony every 5 days, though, and it works great. In fact, I've got some agony scheduled for later this morning

        --Me

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        • #5
          Originally posted by szorn View Post
          Yes, slow rep training can be used with free weights and even bodyweight. Machines were the basis of slow rep training because it started with Nautilus machines and research into women with osteoporosis but doesn't have to rely on machines and I wouldn't recommend that option unless you were coming back from injury, surgery, etc. There are many books out there emphasizing slow rep training with various tools but probably the best is the one you mentioned- "Power of 10" by Adam Zickerman. It includes routines with machines, free weights, and bodyweight.

          Keep in mind that you will need to adjust your rep range to suit the recommend TUT (time under tension). Recommended upper body TUT for strength/size is between 40-70 seconds, no more than 90 seconds. So, if using a 10/5 tempo you would stay in the 3-5 rep range and no more than 6 reps. Some trainers have found that there isn't much more benefit to doing a 10/5 rep speed as opposed to a 5/5 rep speed so they opt for the 5/5. In that case you would stay around the 5-7 rep range. Just some things to keep in mind.


          Steve
          This is interesting. Time under tension, a new world for me now.

          Tell me, when I squat deep, how many seconds should my rep take?

          40-70 seconds for size/strength, does this mean an entire set of squats should take between 40-70 seconds?

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          • #6
            Generally, if a rep is ~23 seconds (10 seconds down, 3 second pause at bottom, 10 seconds back up), a set of 3 reps would be ideal.

            --Me

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            • #7
              Wow my mind is blown. I might be doing my squats a little too fast. Where can I find more information about this subject? I will go through Starting Strength and Beyond Brawn again to see if there is any mention.

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              • #8
                Google:
                Body by Science
                Super Slow
                Ancestral Nutrition Coaching
                Pregnancy Nutrition Coaching
                Primal Pregnancy Nutrition Article

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by dado View Post
                  Wow my mind is blown. I might be doing my squats a little too fast. Where can I find more information about this subject? I will go through Starting Strength and Beyond Brawn again to see if there is any mention.
                  super slow and heavy weights don't seem to go together
                  Currently dabbling in: IF, leangains, Starting Strength, 5/3/1

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by pacificBeef View Post
                    super slow and heavy weights don't seem to go together
                    Definitely not. I was cringing at imagning a super slow deadlift eccentric (lowering) phase. I read an article on T-nation recently that was kinda anti-tempo, especially on DL. It said something like "Nothing good ever happens on the lowering portion of a deadlift". I guess it would be OK with a really light weight, but please, don't try it with anything heavy.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by dado View Post
                      This is interesting. Time under tension, a new world for me now.

                      Tell me, when I squat deep, how many seconds should my rep take?

                      40-70 seconds for size/strength, does this mean an entire set of squats should take between 40-70 seconds?
                      The rep speed can vary but if you want to follow a standard superslow program the rep speed would be 10/5 or 10/10. I prefer a 10/5 tempo as this was the original superslow tempo that has been providing results for well over 25-30 years. The original 10/5 was a 10 second positive (lifting) phase followed by a 5 second negative (lowering) phase.

                      The TUT for the lower body is generally around 90 seconds. So, one set should last about 90 seconds before hitting muscle failure. That would be 6 reps at 15 seconds each.


                      Steve

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by dado View Post
                        Wow my mind is blown. I might be doing my squats a little too fast. Where can I find more information about this subject? I will go through Starting Strength and Beyond Brawn again to see if there is any mention.
                        Starting Strength is against slow rep training. Beyond Brawn talks about controlled reps but doesn't go into the details of rep speed. Just perform an internet search for "time under tension" and "time under load" for more information. It is covered in various books on the subject. Some of the better ones include "A Practical Approach To Strength Training" by Matt Bryzycki, "Total Human: The Complete Strength Training System" by Craig Nybo, and "High Intensity Training" by John Philbin.

                        Steve

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by dado View Post
                          Wow my mind is blown. I might be doing my squats a little too fast. Where can I find more information about this subject? I will go through Starting Strength and Beyond Brawn again to see if there is any mention.
                          You won't find any support for this in Starting Strength - super slow training isn't concerned with improving Barbell lifts.
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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Coach Palfrey View Post
                            You won't find any support for this in Starting Strength - super slow training isn't concerned with improving Barbell lifts.
                            yea i didn't think so.

                            man, i was feeling so angry, but now i feel good again.

                            beyond brawn mentions a pause test, that you can perform once every few weeks or so, where you pause at any point in the motion and hold it there, to see if you're up to it. if you can pause at any point, you are a good man.

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by szorn View Post
                              Starting Strength is against slow rep training. Beyond Brawn talks about controlled reps but doesn't go into the details of rep speed. Just perform an internet search for "time under tension" and "time under load" for more information. It is covered in various books on the subject. Some of the better ones include "A Practical Approach To Strength Training" by Matt Bryzycki, "Total Human: The Complete Strength Training System" by Craig Nybo, and "High Intensity Training" by John Philbin.

                              Steve
                              many thanks to you, steve

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