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Mindset of an active person

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  • Mindset of an active person



    Hi everyone,


    Over the past few months I've developed a preference for natural food (this was clearer than ever with the way I felt after eating holiday fare). I find I select healthy choices without thinking. But I want to lose weight (body fat) and I know exercise helps greatly with this. Diet is only one half of the picture, exercise is the other.


    But exercise (or should I say, my view on exercise) is an aspect of PB I'm having trouble with.


    Exercise is something we were all designed to do, but ever since I was little I've found it intimidating, exhaustive and unpleasant. Also, when I do it with the intention of losing weight I start to resent it because it feels like a chore.


    Basically, my view on it is - it's a chore, you've got to feel whooped every time you do it, and light feel-good exercise isn't good enough.


    I dislike structure and fitness jargon. I don't like the words "working out". However, I enjoy long walks, grocery shopping (if you're a shopoholic I believe it's a form of weight training!) a little running at the park and playing in the playground (you're never too old). I also do yoga and stretches early in the morning or at night. I'm content with doing this daily, but I'm not sure if it's effective for weight loss.


    I recently got a new job where I'm sitting down for most of the day. I feel like I now have the metabolism of a turtle, despite my healthy eating habits. Since I leave very early and get home rather late, all I really have time for (on weekdays) is the yoga.


    I guess my question is, how do you view exercise in a way that will help you maintain it for life (hence the title of this thread)? And is hardcore exercise necessary or sustainable for weight loss?


  • #2
    1



    A lot of friends/family ask me about weight loss solutions and I tell them that if they want to lose weight, they need to change their diet. If they want health benefits, they need to exercise, which may or may not lead to weight loss.


    Hardcore exercise = increased hunger = potential overeating = potential weight gain.


    Myself, I love lifting weights and doing yoga. I also enjoy that feeling of almost flying when sprinting or swinging my hips to a great beat. But also, from CW days, I always equated no exercise with weight gain/fat and this fear still stays with me. You have to find/stick with the things you love. I love my muscles and feeling strong, and, the serenity after a yoga session.


    If you think the activities you do on a weekly basis is sufficient to gain some health benefit, I wouldn't worry about it. Ask yourself, does your heart rate go up a bit at times, are you using your muscles? Muscles are pretty important in your long-term health, so as long as you're using and maintaining them, you'll be great. If you feel you're not, maybe just increase the intensity of some of your workouts. Like, for one yoga session a week, do power yoga. Or learn some full-body exercises you could do at the playground, I'm thinking squats, pushups, chinups. Think of these as "warm-up" exercises before you can do whatever you want to do on the playground.

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    • #3
      1



      You've got the right idea with the exercise you're doing now, especially going to the playground. Watch how children play and try to mimic that kind of thing. When you're at home, instead of walking to another room try scrambling there on all fours, for example. Take a break from sitting every 15 to 20 minutes and walk around the office, or do some squats or pushups at your desk.

      You lousy kids! Get off my savannah!

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      • #4
        1



        syzchan - great advice, thankyou I feel the same when I sprint. It's exhilerating. Power yoga sounds awesome. I'm still new to it all, but once I master the basics I'll be sure to look into it.


        Primalchild - thanks for the suggestions, I like the idea of moving freqenty in short bursts/doses. Mimicking children, that's interesting... and it makes sense.

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        • #5
          1



          Once you workout steadily for a few months, you become addicted to the feeling you get when you're done and you feel terrible if you go more than 2 days without. Not a bad addiction

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          • #6
            1



            My exercise is the hobbies I love to do anyway. That said, if you're not going to get into rock climbing, per se, try squeezing in a walk at work at lunchtime. Take the stairs. Park farther away from the store. You don't need to jog or lift weights to exercise.

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            • #7
              1



              I'd recommend starting some basic weightlifting. Lookup 'body by science' a book by mcguff md. Doing a short weightlifting session once a week is enough. you can look it up on youtube. it involves a few exercises on nautilus machines.


              I personally think there are better methods out there, but it seems like an ideal program for someone who doesn't already lift and, especially, does not enjoy intense exercise.

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              • #8
                1



                I also recommend "Body by Science". The workouts are brief, intense, and only once a week! Strength training is awesome because you can feel the changes in your body after only a few weeks.

                My blog: Pretty Good Paleo
                On Twitter: @NEKLocalvore

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                • #9
                  1



                  I second that suggestion.


                  Also, quick hitting intense body weight routines that last maybe 15 minutes go a long way.

                  I grok, therefore I am.

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